Separation of Church and State Law

N4 p5 to Ge. 1.28. (A dispensation is a period of time during which man is tested in respect of obedience to some specific revelation of the will of God. Seven such dispensations are distinguished in Scripture. Cmt. on Ge 1:28, note 5.)

Ep. 3.1-21 “… If ye have heard of the dispensation of the grace of God which is given me to you-ward: …”

N1 to Jn. 1.16, p1115 “And of his fulness have all we received, and grace for grace.” (Grace. Summary:

  • Grace is “the kindness and love of God our Saviour toward man . . . not by works of righteousness which we have done” (Tit. 3.4, 5). It is, therefore, constantly set in contrast to law, under which God demands righteousness from man, as under grace, he gives righteousness to man (Rom. 3.21,22; 8.4; Phil. 3.9). Law is connected with Moses and works; grace with Christ and faith (John 1.17; Rom. 10.4-10). Law blesses the good; grace saves the bad (Ex. 19.5; Eph. 2.1-9). Law demands that blessings be earned; grace is a free gift (Deut. 28.1-6; Eph. 2.8; rom. 4.4, 5).
  • As a dispensation, grace begins with the death and resurrection of Christ (Rom. 3.24-26; 4.24, 25). The point of testing is no longer legal obedience as the condition of salvation, but acceptance or rejection of Christ, with good works as a fruit of salvation (John 1.12, 13; 3.36; Mt. 21.37; 22.42; John 15.22, 25; Heb. 1.2; 1 John 5.10-12). The immediate result of this testing was the rejection of Christ by the Jews, and His crucifixion by Jew and Gentile (Acts 4.27). The predicted end of the testing of man under grace is the apostasy of the professing church (see “Apostasy,” 2 Tim. 3.1-8, note), and the resultant apocalyptic judgments.
  • Grace has a twofold manifestation: in salvation (Rom. 3.24, refs.), and in the walk and service of the saved (Rom. 6.15, refs.). See, for the other six dispensations: Innocence, Gen. 1.28; Conscience, Gen. 3.23; Human Government, Gen. 8.21; Promise, Gen. 12.1; Law, Ex. 19.8; Kingdom, Eph. 1.10.)

N2 to Ge. 25.1, p37 “Then again Abraham took a wife, and her name was Keturah.” (As Sarah stands for “the mother of us all,” i.e. of those who, by grace, are one with the true Son of promise, of whom Isaac was the type Joh 3:6-8; Ga 4:26,28-29; Heb 2:11-13 and joint heirs of His wealth Heb 1:2; Ro 8:16-17, so Keturah (wedded after the full blessing of Isaac) and her children by Abraham may well stand for the fertility of Israel the natural seed, Jehovah’s wife Ho 2:1-23 after the future national restoration under the Palestinian covenant. Cmt. on De 30:3.)

Headnote to “Joshua: * * * Law, of which Moses is the representative, could never give a sinful people victory (Heb. 7.19; Rom. 6.14; 8.2-4).

See Mcgee, Exodus, Volume II: pp. 172-175, 179-183 for the contrast between law and grace. “The children of Israel traveled from Egypt to Mt. Sinai by the grace of God. Then God asks them if they want to receive the law and commandments, and t hey foolishly agree to accept it instead of saying that they enjoyed the trip on eagles’ wings from Egypt to Mt. Sinai….” P. 207: Under law, to worship afar off; usder grace, near.

N2 to Ex. 17.6, p91 “Behold, I will stand before thee there upon the rock in Horeb; and thou shalt smite the rock, and there shall come water out of it, that the people may drink. And Moses did so in the sight of the elders of Israel.” (The rock, type of life through the Spirit by grace: (1) Christ the Rock 1Co 10:4. (2) The people utterly unworthy Ex 17:2; Eph 2:1-6. (3) Characteristics of life through grace: (a) free (John 4.10; Rom. 6.23; Eph. 2.8); (b) abundant (Rom. 5.20; Psa. 105.41; John 3.16); (c) near (Rom 10.8); (d) the people had only to take (Isa. 55.1). The smitten-rock aspect of the death of Christ looks toware the ourpouring of the Holy Spirit as a result of accomplished redemption, rather than toward our guilt. It is the affirmative side of John 3.16. to perish” speaks of atoning blood; “but have” speaks of life bestowed.)

N3 to Ex. 17.8, p91 (Amalek, grandson of Esau, a type of the flesh.  The resources of man under law). “Then came Amalek, and fought with Israel in Rephidim.” ()

N2,3,4 p93 (N2: “At Sinai Israel learned the lessons: (1) of the holiness of Jehovah through the commandments; (2) of their own sinfulness and weakness through failure; (3) and of the goodness of Jehovah through the provision of priesthood and sacrifice.  The Christian learns through the experience of Rom. 7.7-24 what Israel learned at Sinai.  This division of Exodus should be read in the light of Rom. 3. 19-26; 7.7-24; Gal. 4.1-3. Gal. 3.6-25 explains the relation of the law to the Abrahamic Covenant: (1) the law cannot disannul that covenant; (2) it was ‘added’ to convict of sin; (3) it was a child leader unto Christ; (4) it was but a preparatory discipline ‘till the Seed should come.’” N3: “It is exceedingly important to observe: (1) that Jehovah reminded the people that hitherto they had been the objects of His  free grace: (2) that the law is not proposed as a means of life, but as a means by which Israel might become ‘a peculiar treasure’ and a ‘kingdom of priests’; (3) that the law was not imposed until it had been proposed and voluntarily accepted. The principle is stated in Gal. 5.1-4.” N4: “Cf. 1 Pet. 2.9; Rev. 1.6; 5.10. What, under law, was condition, is under grace, freely given to every believer. The ‘if’ of v. 5 is the essence of law as a method of divine dealing, and the fundamental reason why ‘the law made nothing perfecdt’ (Rom. 8.3; Heb. 7.18, 19). The Abrhamic (Gen. 15.18, note) and New (Heb. 8.8-12, note) covenants minister salvation and assurance because they impose but one condition, faith.”

Grace: N3 to Exo. 19.3, p93 “And Moses went up unto God, and the LORD called unto him out of the mountain, saying, Thus shalt thou say to the house of Jacob, and tell the children of Israel;” (It is exceedingly important to observe: (1) that Jehovah reminded the people that hitherto they had been the objects of His free grace; (2) that the law is not proposed as a means of life, but as a means by which Israel might become “a peculiar treasure” and a “kingdom of priests”; (3) that the law was not imposed until it had been proposed and voluntarily accepted. The principle is stated in Ga 5:1-4.)

N4 to Exo. 19.5, p93 “Exodus 19:5 Now therefore, if ye will obey my voice indeed, and keep my covenant, then ye shall be a peculiar treasure unto me above all people: for all the earth is mine:” ((Cf) 1Pe 2:9; Re 1:6; 5:10. What, under law, was condition, is under grace, freely given to every believer. The “if” of Ex 19:5 is the essence of law as a method of divine dealing, and the fundamental reason why “the law made nothing perfect” Ro 8:3; Heb 7:18-19. The Abrahamic: Cmt. on Ge 15:18 and New Cmt. on Heb 8:8 covenants minister salvation and assurance because they impose but one condition, faith.)

See Mcgee, Exodus, Volume II: pp. 172-175 for the contrast between law and grace. “The children of Israel traveled from Egypt to Mt. Sinai by the grace of God. Then God asks them if they want to receive the law and commandments, and t hey foolishly agree to accept it instead of saying that they enjoyed the trip on eagles’ wings from Egypt to Mt. Sinai….”

Law vs. grace. N1 p113 to Ex. 32.10 “Now therefore let me alone, that my wrath may wax hot against them, and that I may consume them: and I will make of thee a great nation.” “This whole scene affords a striking contrast between law and grace. (Cf) Moses’ intercession with Christ’s Joh 17:1-26 Israel was a nation, under probation Ex 19:5-6 believers under grace are a family, awaiting glory Joh 20:17; Ro 5:1-2. For them there is “an advocate with the Father, whose propitiatory sacrifice never loses efficacy 1Jo 2:1-2. Moses pleads a covenant Ex 32:13. Christ points to a sacrifice Joh 17:4.

N1, 2 p1044 to Mt. 28.19; Lk. 9.51-57. (N1 With the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ begins the “dispensation of the grace of God” (Eph. 3.2), which is defined as “his kindness toward us through Christ Jesus”; and, “the gift of God: not of works, lest any man should boast” (Rom. 6.23; accounts to him a perfect righteousness (Rom. 3.21, 22; 4.4, 5); and accords to him a perfect position (Eph. 1.6). The predicted results of this sixth testing of man are: (1) The salvation of all who believe (Acts 16.31); (2) judgment upon an unbelieving world and an apostate church (Mt. 25.36-41; 2 Thes. 1.7-10; 1 Pet. 4.17, 18; Rev. 3. 15, 16).

  • “(1) Man’s state at the beginning of the dispensation of grace (Rom. 3.19;  Gal. 3.22.; Eph. 2.11, 12). (2) Man’s responsibility under grace (John 1.11, 12; 3.36; 6.28, 29). (3) His predicted failure (Mt. 24.37-39; Lk. 18.8; 19.12-14). (4) The judgment (2 Thes. 2.7-12).”
  • See, for the other dispensations: Conscience (Gen. 3.23); Human Government (Gen. 8.20); Promise (Gen. 12.1); Law (Ex. 19.8); Grace (John 1.17); Kingdom (Eph. 1.10).)

N1 p1113 5o Lk. 24.51: “The attitude of our Lord here characterizes this age.  It is one of grace; an ascended Lord is blessing a believing people with spiritual blessings.  The Jewish age was marked by temporal blessings as the reward of an obedient people (Deut. 28.1-15).  In the kingdom-age spiritual and temporal blessings unite.”

N1 to Jn. 1.16, p1115 Grace. Summary:

  • Grace is “the kindness and love of God our Saviour toward man . . . not by works of righteousness which we have done” (Tit. 3.4, 5). It is, therefore, constantly set in contrast to law, under which God demands righteousness from man, as under grace, he gives righteousness to man (Rom. 3.21,22; 8.4; Phil. 3.9). Law is connected with Moses and works; grace with Christ and faith (John 1.17; Rom. 10.4-10). Law blesses the good; grace saves the bad (Ex. 19.5; Eph. 2.1-9). Law demands that blessings be earned; grace is a free gift (Deut. 28.1-6; Eph. 2.8; rom. 4.4, 5).
  • As a dispensation, grace begins with the death and resurrection of Christ (Rom. 3.24-26; 4.24, 25). The point of testing is no longer legal obedience as the condition of salvation, but acceptance or rejection of Christ, with good works as a fruit of salvation (John 1.12, 13; 3.36; Mt. 21.37; 22.42; John 15.22, 25; Heb. 1.2; 1 John 5.10-12). The immediate result of this testing was the rejection of Christ by the Jews, and His crucifixion by Jew and Gentile (Acts 4.27). The predicted end of the testing of man under grace is the apostasy of the professing church (see “Apostasy,” 2 Tim. 3.1-8, note), and the resultant apocalyptic judgments.
  • Grace has a twofold manifestation: in salvation (Rom. 3.24, refs.), and in the walk and service of the saved (Rom. 6.15, refs.). See, for the other six dispensations: Innocence, Gen. 1.28; Conscience, Gen. 3.23; Human Government, Gen. 8.21; Promise, Gen. 12.1; Law, Ex. 19.8; Kingdom, Eph. 1.10.

Headnote to Acts: “Acts 11, 12, 15 are transitional, establishing finally the distinction, doctrinally, between law and grace.  Galatians should be read in this connection.”

N1 p1169 to Acts 15.13 “And after they had held their peace, James answered, saying, Men and brethren, hearken unto me: 14 Simeon hath declared how God at the first did visit the Gentiles, to take out of them a people for his name. 15 And to this agree the words of the prophets; as it is written, 16 After this I will return, and will build again the tabernacle of David, which is fallen down; and I will build again the ruins thereof, and I will set it up: 17 That the residue of men might seek after the Lord, and all the Gentiles, upon whom my name is called, saith the Lord, who doeth all these things. 18 Known unto God are all his works from the beginning of the world.” (Dispensationally, this is the most important passage in the N.T. It gives the divine purpose for this age, and for the beginning of the next. (1) The taking out from among the Gentiles of a people for His name, the distinctive work of the present, or church-age. The church is the ecclesia–the “called-out assembly.” Precisely this has been in progress since Pentecost. The Gospel has never anywhere converted all, but everywhere has called out some. (2) “After this viz. the out-calling I will return.” James quotes from Am 9:11-12. The verses which follow in Amos describe the final regathering of Israel, which the other prophets invariably connect with the fulfilment of the Davidic Covenant (e.g.) Isa 11:1,10-12; Jer 23:5-8. (3) “And will build again the tabernacle of David,” i.e. re-establish the Davidic rule over Israel 2Sa 7:8-17; Lu 1:31-33. (4) “That the residue of men Israelites may seek after the Lord” cf Zec 12:7; 13:1-2. (5) “And all the Gentiles,” etc. cf Mic 4:2; Zec 8:21-22. This is also the order of Ro 11:24-27.)

N1 p1170 to Acts 15.19 “Acts 15:19  Wherefore my sentence is, that we trouble not them, which from among the Gentiles are turned to God:” (The scope of the decision goes far beyond the mere question of circumcision. The whole question of the relation of the law to Gentile believers had been put in issue (Ac 15:5), and their exemption is declared in the decision (Ac 15:19,24). The decision might be otherwise stated in the terms of Ro 6:14. ‘Ye are not under the law, but under grace.’ Gentile believers were to show grace by abstaining from the practices offensive to godly Jews.Ac 15:20-21,28-29 cf Ro 14:12-17; 1Co 8:1-13.)

N1 p1211 to 1 Co. 1.2 “Unto the church of God which is at Corinth, to them that are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints, with all that in every place call upon the name of Jesus Christ our Lord, both theirs and ours:” (1Co 1:2-9, in contrast with vs. 10-13, illustrate a distinction constantly made in the Epistles between the believer’s position in Christ Jesus, in the family of God, and his walk, or actual state. Christian position in grace is the result of the work of Christ, and is fully entered the moment that Christ is received by faith Joh 1:12-13; Ro 8:1,15-17; 1Co 1:2; 12:12-13; Ga 3:26 Eph 1:3-14 2:4-9 1Pe 2:9 Re 1:6 5:9,10. The weakest, most ignorant, and fallible believer has precisely the same relationships in grace as the most illustrious saint. All the after work of God in his behalf, the application of the word to walk and conscience Joh 17:17; Eph 5:26 the divine chastenings 1Co 11:32; Heb 12:10, the ministry of the Spirit Eph 4:11-12 the difficulties and trials of the path 1Pe 4:12-13 and the final transformation at the appearing of Christ 1Jo 3:2 have for their object to make the believer’s character conform to his exalted position in Christ. He grows in grace, not into grace.).

Headnote to 2 Co. “… It is evident that the really dangerous sect in Corinth was that which said, “and I of Christ” (1Co 1:12). They rejected the new revelation through Paul of the doctrines of grace; grounding themselves, probably, on the kingdom teachings of our Lord as “a minister of circumcision” (Ro 15:8); seemingly oblivious that a new dispensation had been introduced by Christ’s death. This made necessary a defence of the origin and extent of Paul’s apostolic authority. …”

Headnote to Galatians: “WRITER. The Apostle Paul (1.1)

  • DATE. Galatians was probably written A.D. 60, during Paul’s third visit to Corinth, The occasion of the Epistle is evident. It had come to Paul’s knowledge that the fickle Galatians, who were not Greeks, but Gauls, “a stream from the torrent of barbarians which poured into Greece in the third century before Christ,” had become the prey of the legalizers, the Judaizing missionaries from Palestine.
  • THEME. The theme of Galatians is the vindication of the Gospel of the grace of God from any admixture of law-conditions, which qualify or destroy its character of pure grace.
  • The Galatian error had two forms, both of which are refuted. The first is the teaching that obedience to the law is mingled with faith as the ground of the sinner’s justification; the second, that the justified believer is made perfect by keeping the law. Paul meets the first form of the error by a demonstration that justification is through the Abrahamic Covenant (Ge 15:18), and that the law, which was four hundred and thirty years after the confirmation of that covenant, and the true purpose of which was condemnation, not justification, cannot disannul a salvation which rests upon the earlier covenant. Paul meets the second and more subtle form by vindicating the office of the Holy Spirit as Sanctifier.
  • The book is in seven parts: I. Salutation 1.1-5 II. Theme, 1.6-9. III. Paul’s Gospel is a revelation, 1.10-2.14. IV. Justification is by faith without law, 2.15-3.24. V. The rule of the believer’s life is gracious, not legal, 3.25-5.15. VI. Sanctification is through the Spirit, not the law, 5.16-24. VII. Exhortations and conclusion, 5.25-6.18.”

N1 p1241 to Ga. 1.6: “I marvel that ye are so soon removed from him that called you into the grace of Christ unto another gospel:” (The test of the Gospel is grace. If the message excludes grace, or mingles law with grace as the means of either of justification or sanctification Ga 2:21; 3:1-3 or denies the fact or guilt of sin which alone gives grace its occasion and opportunity, it is “another” gospel, and the preacher of it is under the anathema of God Ga 1:8-9.)

N2 p1241 to Ga. 1.10 “The demonstration is as follows: (1) The Galatians know Paul, that he is no seeker after popularity Ga 1:10. (2) He puts his known character back of the assertion that his Gospel of grace was a revelation from God (Ga 1:11-12). (3) As for the Judaizers, Paul had been a foremost Jew, and had forsaken Judaism for something better (). (4) He had preached grace years before he saw any of the other apostles (Ga 1:15-24). (5) When he did meet the other apostles they had nothing to add to his revelations Ga 2:1-6. (6) The other apostles fully recognized Paul’s apostleship. Ga 2:7-10. (7) If the legalizers pleaded Peter’s authority, the answer was that he himself had claimed none when rebuked (Ga 2:11-14).”

N1 p1242 to Ga. 1.13: “For ye have heard of my conversation in time past in the Jews’ religion, how that beyond measure I persecuted the church of God, and wasted it:” (The new dispensation of grace having come in, the Mosaic system, if still persisted in, becomes a mere “Jews’ religion.)

Ga. 4.19-31 (The two systems, law and grace cannot co-exist.).

N1 p1246 to Ga. 4.19 “My little children, of whom I travail in birth again until Christ be formed in you,” (The allegory Ga 4:22-31 is addressed to justified but immature believers (cf) 1Co 3:1-2 who, under the influence of legalistic teachers, “desire to be under the law,” and has, therefore, no application to a sinner seeking justification. It raises and answers, for the fifth time in this Epistle, the question, Is the believer under the law? Ga 2:19-21; 3:1-3,25; 4:4-6,9-31.)

Ga. 4.19-31. “… 28 Now we, brethren, as Isaac was, are the children of promise. 29 But as then he that was born after the flesh persecuted him that was born after the Spirit, even so it is now. 30 Nevertheless what saith the scripture? Cast out the bondwoman and her son: for the son of the bondwoman shall not be heir with the son of the freewoman. 31 So then, brethren, we are not children of the bondwoman, but of the free.”

Ga. 5.4 “Christ is become of no effect unto you, whosoever of you are justified by law; ye are fallen from grace.”

Ga. 5.19-31 The two systems, law and grace, cannot co-exist (the son of he bondwoman and the son of the freewoman, Sarah, are an allegory, etc. Application of the allegory in Gal. 5.)

See         Dispensation of Law for more details from this part of Galatians on Grace and Law.

Ep. 3.1-21 “… If ye have heard of the dispensation of the grace of God which is given me to you-ward: …”

N1 p1320 to II P2. 3.18: “But grow in grace, and in the knowledge of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. To him be glory both now and for ever. Amen.” (Grace (imparted), Summary (see ‘Grace,’ John 1.16); Grace is not only dispensationally a divine dealing in salvation (John 1.16, note), but is also the method of God in the believer’s life and service.  As saved, he is ‘not under the law, but under grace’ (Rom. 6.14). Having by grace brought the believer into the highest conceivable position (Eph. 1.6), God ceaselessly works through grace, to impart to, and perfrect in him, corresponding graces (John 15.4,5; 16; 1 Cor. 1.3-7; 3.10; 15.10; 2 Cor. 12.9, 10; Gal. 2.9; Eph. 3.7, 8; 4.7; Phil. 1.7; 2 Tim. 2.1, 2; 1 Pet. 4.10); with Christian growth (2 Cor. 1.12; Eph. 4.29; Col. 3.16; 4.6; 2 Thes. 1.12; Heb. 4.16; 12.28, 29; 13.9; Jas. 4.6; 1 Pet. 1.2; 3.7; 5.5.10; 2 Pet. 3.18; Jude 4); and with giving (2 Cor. 4.15; 8.1, 6, 7, 19; 9.14).)

The following is copied from “Topical Index” (topic: Grace)

N1 p1320 (imparted), Summary (See “Grace,” John 1.16): Grace is not only dispensationally a method of divine dealing in salvation (John 1.16, note), but is also the method of Gopd in the believ er’s life and service.  As saved, he is “not under the law, but under  grace” (Rom. 6.14). Having by grace brought the believer into the highest conceivable position (Eph. 1.6). god ceaselessly works through grace, to impart to, and perfect in him, corresponding graces (Hohn  15.4, 5; Gal. 5.22, 23). Grace, therefore, stqands connected with service (Rom. 12.6; 15.15, 16; 1 Cor. 1.3-7; 3/10; 15.10; 2 Cor. 12.9, 10; Gal. 2.9; Eph. 3.7, 8; 4.7; Phil 1.7; 2 Tim. 2.1, 2; 1 Pet. 4.10); with Christian growth (2 Cor. 1.12; Eph. 4.29; Col. 3.16; 4.6; 2 Thes. 1.qw; Heb. 4.16; 12.28, 29; 13.9; Jas 4.6; 1 Pet. 1.2; 3.7; 5.5, 10; 2 Pet. 3.19; Jude 4); and with giving (2 Cor. 4.15; 8.1, 6, 7, 19; 9.14).

 


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