Separation of Church and State Law

Contents:

1. General notes
2. Topical Index from a-z

1. General Notes

N1 p1138: “Christ’s pre-authentication of the New Testament: (1) He expressly declared that He would leave “many things” unrevealed (v. 12). (2) He promised that this revelation should be completed (“all things”) after the Spirit should come, and that such additional revelation should include new prophecies (v. 13). (3) He chose certain persons to receive such additional revelations, and to be His witnesses to them (Mt. 28.19; John 15.27; 16.13; Acts 1.8; 9.15-17). (4) He gave to their words when speaking for Him in the Spirit precisely the same authority as His own (Mt. 10.14, 15; Lk 10.16; John 13.20; see e.g., 1 Cor. 14.37, and “Inspiration,” Ex. 4.15; Rev. 22.19).”

N1 p1213 to 1 Cor. 2.10-16 ((1) The writers of scripture invariably affirm, where the subject is mentioned by them at all, that the words of their writings are divinely taught.  This, of necessity, refers to the original documents, not to translations and versions; but the labours of competent scholars have brought our [King James version] to a degree of perfection so remarkable that we may confidently rest upon them as authoritative. (2) 1 Cor. 2.9-14 gives the process by which a truth passes from the mind of God to the minds of His people. (a) The unseen things of God are undiscoverable by the natural man (v9). (b) These unseen things God has revealed to chosen men (v13). (c) The revealed things are communicated in Spirit-taught words (v13).  This implies neither mechanical dictation nor the effacement of the writer’s personality, but only that the Spirit infallibly guides in the choice of words from the writer’s own vocabulary (v13).  (d) These Spirit-taught words, in which the revelation has been expressed, are discerned, as to their true spiritual content, only by the spiritual among believers (1 Cor. 2.15, 16). See also Rev. 22.19, note” and “Scripture, inspiration of” below.)

Christ a divider of men. Lk. 12.49-53.

The rebuke of Sectarianism: Lk. 9.49-50: “49 And John answered and said, Master, we saw one casting out devils in thy name; and we forbad him, because he followeth not us. 50 And Jesus said unto him, Forbid him not: for he that is not against us is for us.  See also Mk. 9.38-40.

N2 p1249 to Eph. 1.3 (* * * “The believer is a heavenly man, and a stranger and pilgrim on the earth (Heb. 3.1; 1 Pet. 2.11)).

How the religious crowd receives the truth: Lk. 4.16-30 (Jesus’ words bring the wrath of the religious).

Jesus foretells his death & resurrection: (Mt.12.38-42; Lk. 11.29, 30 No sign by but the sign of the prophet Jonas);(Mt. 16.21-27; Mk. 8.31-38; Lk. 9.22-27); (Mt. 17.22-23; Mk. 9.30-32; Lk. 9.43-45); (Mt. 19.17-19; Mk. 10.32-34; Lk. 18.31-34.); Mt. 26.2;

“Every word of God is pure: he is a shield unto them that put their trust in him. Add thou not to his words, lest he reprove thee, and thou be found a liar.” Pro. 30.5-6

“The words of the LORD are pure words: as silver tried in
a furnace of earth, purified seven times. Thou shalt keep them, O LORD, thou shalt preserve them from this
generation forever.” Psm. 12.6-7

“No man that warreth entangleth himself with the affairs of
this life: that he may please him who hath chosen him
to be a soldier.” 2 Timothy 2.4

The resort to Egypt (the world) is typical of the tendency to substitute for lost spiritual power the fleshly resources of the world, instead of seeking, through confession and amendment, the restoration of God’s presence and favour. N2 p21.

God doesn’t call the qualified, He qualifies the called.

God says he is the one that gave the Jews the power to get
wealth. Deut. 8.18.

Cursed be he that removeth his neighbour’s landmark.
Deu. 27.17

“(7) The holiness and resurrection of Christ prove His deity (John 8.46; Rom. 1.4).”)

N1 p1161.

No one has seen the divine essence, God in His own triune person. But God, veiled in angelic form, and especially as incarnate in Jesus Christ, has been seen of men. See N2 p1115 for verses to show this.

Jesus begins to speak of His death & resurrection, a turning point of immense significance.  See Mt. 16.21.

The weakest, most ignorant, and fallible believer has precisely the same relationships in grace as the most illustrious saint.  See N1 p1211 to 1 Cor. 1.2 (the believer’s postion in Christ Jesus, in the family of God, and his walk, or actual state)..

3 conditions of fruitful life: Cleansing, abiding, obedience. N2 p1136 to Jn. 15.2. N3 p1136-“abiding.”

The rebuke of sectarianism (he which is not against us is for us.). Mk. 9.39-40; Lk. 9.49-50.

The whole cause of Christ is injured by the sin, neglect, or unspirituality of one believer.  See N1 p265 and 1 Cor. 5.1-7; 12.12-14, 26.

Christ’s relationship to the law of Moses. N1 p1000.

Eze. 18: The son not responsible for the sins of the father, etc., repentance. Eze. 33.7-20: repentance of the wicked allowed.

“The woman shall not wear that which pertaineth unto a man, neither shall a man put on a woman’s garment: for all that do so are abomination unto the LORD thy God.” Deut. 22.5.

God uses those who are weak, not the strong.  See Judges, Mcgee pp. 150-152, 155, 163, 176. See also, N1, p307.

Christ confirmed the creation of man: N3 p5 (Mt. 19.4; Mk. 10.6).


2. Topical Index from a-z

Serving other Gods: Exodus 23.24,32-3 (. . . for if thou serve their gods, it will surely be a snare unto thee.;.

Deut. 4.15-19, 23-29. Warning against corrupting themselves by making a graven image, the similitude of any figure, the likeness of male or female, etc. * * * to lift up their eyes to worship and serve the sun, the moon, the stars, even all the host of heaven.
        Deut. 6.14-15, 7.3-4, 25-26; “[I]f thou . . . walk after other gods, and serve them, and worship them, I testify against you this day that ye shall surely perish. As the nations which the LORD destroyeth before your face . . . .” Deut. 8.19-20. Deut. 11.16-17.
“Ye shall utterly destroy all the places, wherein the nations which ye shall possess served their gods, upon the high mountains, and upon the hills, and under every green tree; And ye shall overthrow their altars, and break their pillars, and burn their groves with fire; and ye shall hew down the graven images of their gods, and destroy the names of them out of that place.” Deut. 12.2-3.
“[B]e not snared by following them, after that they be destroyed from before thee; and that thou enquire not after their gods, saying, How did these nations serve their gods: even so shall I do likewise. . . . Deut. 12.30-32, 13.1-18 (kill anyone who entices you to serve other Gods).
Deut. 17. 2-7 (idolaters to be stoned). Deut. 18.9-14 (idolatrous practices forbidden). Deut. 20.18.
Deut. 27.15. Deut. 29.17, 18, 26-28. Deut. 31.14-23 (God warns Moses of the apostasy of Israel). Deut. 31.29; 32.5 etc. (Moses tells the people of the coming apostasy.).
Be ye therefore very courageous to keep and do all that is written in the book of the law of Moses, that ye turn not aside therefrom to the right hand or to the left; That ye come not among these nations, these that remain among you; neither make mention of the name of their gods, nor cause to swear by them, neither serve them, nor bow yourselves unto them; but cleave unto the LORD your God . . . .” Joshua 23.6-8.
Josh. 24.20-28 [In v. 21 the people say they will serve the LORD.  How long?  See Judges 2.1-23.].
In the book of Judges, the people served the LORD all the days of Joshua, and all the days of the elders that outlived Joshua, who had seen all the great works of the LORD, that he did for Israel. 2.7.  But a generation arose which knew not the LORD, nor the works he had done for Israel. 2.10.  Then they served Baalim, forsook the LORD, followed other gods, of the gods of the people that were around them, and bowed themselves unto them, and provoked the LORD to anger. 2.12.  God was angered, and he delivered them into the hands of spoilers that spoiled them, and he sold them into the hands of their enemies round about, so that they could n to any longer stand before their enemies. 2.14. Then the LORD raised up judges. 2.16. But they would not hearken unto their judges, but they went a whoring after other gods, and bowed themselves unto them, etc. 2.17.
To Solomon: 1 Ki. 6.12-13; 9.1-9; 2 Chr. 7.12-22 (Notice the promises for keeping God’s statutes & commandments & the consequences for not doing so.  Notice esp. that God is concerned that the nation shall not go & serve other gods, worship them).
“The priests said not, Where is the LORD? and they that handle the law knew me not: the pastors also transgressed against me, and the prophets prophesied by Baal, and walked after things that do not profit. . . . Hath a nation changed their gods, which are yet no gods? But my people have changed their glory for that which doth not profit. . . . For my people have committed two evils; they have forsaken me the fountain of living waters, and hewed them out cisterns, broken cisterns, that  can hold no water.” Jer. 2.8, 11, 13.
N1 p 19: Gen. 11 & 12 mark an important turning point in the divine dealing.  Heretofore, the history has been that of the whole Adamic race. . . .  [Purposes for which Israel called are given] A wholly new responsibility arises when either Jew or Gentile knows the Gospel (scriptures given).

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Israel’s (Jacob’s) sons:

Jacob & Leah’s sons: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah. Gen. 29.32-35.
Jacob & Bilbah’s (Rachel’s maid’s) sons: Dan (30.6), Naphtali (30.8).
Jacob & Zilpah’s (Leah’s maid’s) sons: Gad (30.11), Asher (30.13).
Jacob & Leah’s sons: Issachar (30.18), Zebulun (30.20), [Daughter Dinah (30.21)]
Jacob & Rachel’s sons: Joseph (30.24), Benjamin (35.18). Rachel died during childbirth) See N3 p51.
All the sons are listed in Gen. 35.23-26.
Joseph was a type of Christ.  See N2 p53.

Hezekiah. Notice that Hezekiah, the king, made many religious reforms.2. Ki. 18.1-20.21; 2 Chr. 29.1-32.33.  He did this as king, including removing all the idols, etc.  “[A]nd in every work that he began in the service of the house of God, in in the law, and in the commandments, to seek his God, he did it with all his heart, and prospered.” 2 Chr. 31.21.

There is one lawgiver . . . .” James 4.12.  One law for the stranger as well as for he of your own country. Lev. 24.22.

Has man seen God? N2 p1115.

The six laws to be distinguished in Romans. N3 p1200.

Summary of the kingdom from Adam & Eve to the kingdom. N2 p976-7.

Summary of the OT doctrine of the holy spirit. N1 p 981-2.

Summary of the OT revelation of Diety. N1 p 983.

The two James in the NT: N1, p999.


 

2. Topical Index from a-z

Abortion: Psm. 106.37-8 (“Yea, they sacrificed their sons and their daughters unto devils, And shed innocent blood, even the blood of their sons and of their daughters, whom they sacrificed unto the idols of Canaan: and the land was polluted with blood.” [see following verses for the consequences]).

Abraham: N1 p30 (Abraham & Lot contrasted); N2 p32 (The 4 great crises of Abraham).

Adoption: N2 p1250.

Adultery & fornication: Deut. 22.20-30 (punishments for different types of adultery). Deut. 24.17-18 (no whores or sodomites).

Advocacy: N1 p1322.

Allegory: McGee, Micah, p. 120 (comments on Micah 4.1): “We have no right to spiritualize a passage unless there is Scriptural authority for doing so, and we do have it for this….

Alliance w/nonbelievers: Isa. 30 (Warnings against an alliance w/Egypt against Sennacaherib; Eshoration  to turn to the Lord for help against Sennacherib: foreshadowing of kingdom blessing). Isa. 31 (Judah warned against the Egyptian alliance: Jehovah will defend Jerusalem).

  • Angel:
    N1 p1291 to Hebrews 1.4 “Being made so much better than the angels, as he hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.” “Angel, Summary: Angel, “messenger,” is used of God, of men, and of an order of created spiritual beings whose chief attributes are strength and wisdom. (2Sa 14:20; Ps 103:20; 104:4). In the O.T. the expression “the angel of the Lord” (sometimes “of God”) usually implies the presence of Deity in angelic form. (Ge 16:1-13; 21:17-19; 22:11-16; 31:11-13; Ex 3:2-4; Jg 2:1; 6:12-16; 13:3-22 Cmt. on Mal 3:1.) The word “angel” is used of men in Lu 7:24; Jas 2:25; Re 1:20-2:1; 2:8,12; 3:1,7,14. Christ is evidently meant. Sometimes angel is used of the spirit of man. Mt 18:10; Ac 12:15. Though angels are spirits (Ps 104:4; Heb 1:14) power is given them to become visible in the semblance of human form. (Ge 19:1 cf Ge 19:5; Ex 3:2; Nu 22:22-31; Jg 2:1; 6:11; 13:3,6; 1Ch 21:16,20; Lu 1:26; Joh 20:12; Ac 7:30; 12:7-8, etc.). The word is always used in the masculine gender, though sex, in the human sense, is never ascribed to angels. (Mt 22:30; Mr 12:25). They are exceedingly numerous. (Mt 26:53; Heb 12:22; Re 5:11; Ps 68:17.) The power is inconceivable. (2Ki 19:35.) Their place is about the throne of God. ( 5:11; 7:11.) Their relation to the believer is that of “ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation,” and this ministry has reference largely to the physical safety and well-being of believers. (1Ki 19:5; Ps 34:7; 91:11; Da 6:22; Mt 2:13; 4:11; Lu 22:43; Ac 5:19; 12:7-10.) From (Heb 1:14; Mt 18:10; Ps 91:11) it would seem that this care for the heirs of salvation begins in infancy and continues through life. The angels observe us (1Co 4:9; Eph 3:10; Ec 5:6) a fact which should influence conduct. They receive departing saints. (Lu 16:22.) Man is made “a little lower than the angels,” and in incarnation Christ took “for a little “time” this lower place. (Ps 8:4-5; Heb 2:6,9) that He might lift the believer into His own sphere above angels. (Heb 2:9-10.) The angels are to accompany Christ in His second advent. (Mt 25:31.) To them will be committed the preparation of the judgment of the nations. (Mt 13:30,39,41-42. Cmt. on Mt 25:32.) The kingdom-age is not to be subject to angels, but to Christ and those for whom He was made a little lower than the angels. (Heb 2:5) An archangel, Michael, is mentioned as having a particular relation to Israel and to the resurrections. (Da 10:13; 12:1-2; Jude 1:9; 1Th 4:16.) The only other angel whose name is revealed Gabriel, was employed in the most distinguished services. (Da 8:16; 9:21; Lu 1:19,26.)
  • “Fallen angels. Two classes of these are mentioned: (1) “The angels which kept not their first estate place, but left their own habitation,” are “chained under darkness,” awaiting judgment. (2Pe 2:4; Jude 1:6; 1Co 6:3; Joh 5:22.) (Cmt. on Ge 6:4) (2) The angels who have Satan (Ge 3:1) as leader. (Cmt. on Re 20:10.) The origin of these is nowhere explicitly revealed. They may be identical with the demons. (Cmt. on Mt 7:22.) For Satan and his angels everlasting fire is prepared. (Mt 25:41; Re 20:10.)”
  • N2 to Jude 6, p1328 “And the angels which kept not their first estate, but left their own habitation, he hath reserved in everlasting chains under darkness unto the judgment of the great day.” “The judgment of the fallen angels. The ‘great day’ is the day of the Lord Isa 2:9-22. As the final judgment upon Satan occurs after the thousand years, and preceding the final judgment Re 20:10 it is congruous to conclude, as to the time, that other fallen angels are judged with him 2Pe 2:4; Re 20:10. Christians are associated with Christ in this judgment. For association with angels at judgment 1Co 6:3. For other information on Re 20:12.” Margin: angels Cmt. on Heb 1:4.

Antichrist: N3 p1342 to Rev. 13.16 “And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads:” (Antichrist the person is to be distinguished from the “many antichrists” 1Jo 2:18 and the “spirit of antichrist” 1Jo 4:3 which characterizes all. The supreme mark of all is the denial of the Christian truth of the incarnation of the Logos, the eternal Son in Jesus as the Christ Joh 1:1,14. Cmt. on Mt 1:16. The “many antichrists” precede and prepare the way for the Antichrist, who is “the Beast out of the earth” of Re 13:11-17 and the “false prophet” of Re 16:13; 19:20; 20:10. He is the last ecclesiastical head, as the Beast of Re 13:1-8 is the last civil head. For purposes of persecution he is permitted to exercise the autocratic power of the emperor-Beast. Cmt. on Re 19:20.)

Apostles: See also, “Disciples.” Names of the 12: Mt. 10:2-4; Mk. 3.13-19; Luke 6.12-19.

    • Matthew 10:2-: “2 Now the names of the twelve apostles are these; The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother; 3 Philip, and Bartholomew; Thomas, and Matthew the publican; James the son of Alphaeus, and Lebbaeus, whose surname was Thaddaeus; 4 Simon the Canaanite, and Judas Iscariot, who also betrayed him. 5 These twelve Jesus sent forth, and commanded them, saying, Go not into the way of the Gentiles, and into any city of the Samaritans enter ye not: 6 But go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. 7 And as ye go, preach, saying, The kingdom of heaven is at hand.”
      N1 to Mt. 10.2, p1008: “Now the names of the twelve apostles are these; The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother;” (The word apostle, = “one sent forth,” is used of our Lord Heb 3:1. Elsewhere it is used for the twelve who were called to that office by our Lord during His earth ministry; of Paul, called to the apostleship by the risen and ascended Lord, and of Barnabas Ac 14:14 specially designated by the Holy Spirit Ac 13:2. Of Matthias, chosen by lot by the eleven to take the place of Judas Iscariot, Ac 1:16-26: “And he was numbered with the eleven.” Ac 1:26
      The “signs” of an apostle were (1) They were chosen directly by the Lord Himself, or, as in the case of Barnabas, by the Holy Spirit Mt 10:1-2; Mr 3:13-14; Lu 6:13; Ac 9:6; 13:2; 22:10,14-15; Ro 1:1 (2) They were endued with sign gifts, miraculous powers which were the divine credentials of their office Mt 10:1; Ac 5:15; 16:16-18; +1″>Mt 28:8-9. (3) Their relation to the kingdom was that of heralds, announcing to Israel only Mt 10:5-6 the kingdom as at hand. Cmt. on Mt 4:17 and manifesting kingdom powers Mt 10:7-8. (4) To one of them, Peter, the keys of the kingdom of heaven, viewed as the sphere of Christian profession, as in Mat 13, were given Mt 16:19. (5) Their future relation to the king will be that of judges over the twelve tribes Mt 19:28. (6) Consequent upon the rejection of the kingdom, and the revelation of the mystery hid in God Mt 16:18; Eph 3:1-12 the Church, the apostolic office was invested with a new enduement, the baptism with the Holy Spirit Ac 2:1-4 a new power, that of imparting the Spirit to Jewish-Christian believers; a new relation, that of foundation stones of the new temple Eph 2:20-22 and a new function, that of preaching the glad tidings of salvation through a crucified and risen Lord to Jew and gentile alike. (7) The indispensable qualification of an apostle was that he should have been an eye-witness of the resurrection Ac 1:22; 1Co 9:1. Margin: James son of Zebedee on Mt 4:21.).
    • John 1.35-51;
    • 1 Cor. 4.8-21: The apostolic example of humility & patience. Apostles are made a spectacle unto the world, are fools for Christ’s sake, weak, despised, hungry, thirsting, naked, buffeted, have no certain dwelling place, labour, reviled, persecuted defamed made as the filth of the world, are the offscouring of all things, etc. But there is such a thing as apostolic authority.
    • See McGee, Ephesians, pp 17-18: Paul states, “I am an apostle.” An apostle is the highest office the church has ever had. No one today is an apostle because no one can meet the requirements. The requirements of an apostle are: (1) The apostles received their commission directly from the living lips of Jesus Christ. Paul made that claim for himself. He wrote, “Paul, an apostle, (not of men, neither by man, but by Jesus Christ, and God the Father, who raised him from the dead” (Ga. 1.1). This is the reason Paul took the place of Judas, according to Dr. McGee. The disciples had selected Matthias, but one can find no where in the Bible that Jesus Christ made him an apostle. Apparently all the apostles received their commission directly from the Lord Jesus. (2) The apostles saw the Saviour after His resurrection. Paul could meet that requirement. (3) The apostles exercised a special inspiration. They expounded and wrote Scripture (See John 14.26; 16.13; Ga. 1.11, 12). Paul measures up to that  more than any apostle. (4) They exercised supreme authority (Jn. 20.22, 23; 2 Co. 10.8). (5) The badge of authority was the power to work miracles (Mk. 6.13; Lk. 9.1, 2; Ac. 2.43). Such power is not invested in men today. That was the badge of an apostle. John wrote at the end of the first centruy, “If there come any unto you, and bring not this doctrine, receive him not into your house, neither bid him God speec” (2 Jn. 10). The badge was no longer the ability to work miricles but having right doctrine. (6) They were given a universal commission to found churches (2 Co. 11.28).

Ark: N3 p13; N2 p101

Assurance: N1 to Jude 1, p1328. “Jude, the servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James, to them that are sanctified by God the Father, and preserved in Jesus Christ, and called:” (Assurance is the believer’s full conviction that, through the work of Christ alone, received by faith, he is in possession of a salvation in which he will be eternally kept. And this assurance rests only upon the Scripture promises to him who believes.)

Atonement:

  • N3 p104 to Exo. 27.1“Exodus 27:1 And thou shalt make an altar of shittim wood, five cubits long, and five cubits broad; the altar shall be foursquare: and the height thereof shall be three cubits.” (height (Cf) Ex 25:10. The altar of burnt offering is double the height of the mercy-seat. The atonement more than saves us– it glorifies God Joh 17:14.)
  • N1 p110 to Exodus 29.33 “And they shall eat those things wherewith the atonement was made, to consecrate and to sanctify them: but a stranger shall not eat thereof, because they are” (Heb. kaphar, “to cover.” The English word “atonement” (at-one-ment) is not a translation of the Heb. kaphar, but a translator’s interpretation. According to Scripture the legal sacrifice “covered” the offerer’s sin and secured the divine forgiveness; according to the translators it made God and the sinner at-one. But the O.T. sacrifices did not at-one the sinner and God. “It is not possible that the blood of bulls and goats should take away sins.” Heb 10:4. The Israelite’s offering implied confession of sin and of its due desert, death; and God “covered” (passed over,” Ro 3:25) his sin, in anticipation of Christ’s sacrifice, which did, finally, “put away” the sins “done aforetime in the forbearance of God.” Ro 3:25; Heb 9:15. Cmt. on Ro 3:25. The word “atonement” does not occur in the N.T.; Ro 5:11 meaning reconciliation, and so rendered in the R.V. See “Sacrifice,” Gen 4.4, and refs. Cmt. on Ge 4:4; Cmt. on Le 16:5)
  • 23 “4 Because they met you not with bread and with water in the way, when ye came forth out of Egypt; and because they hired against thee Balaam the son of Beor or Pethor of Mesopotamia, to curse thee. 5 Nevertheless the LORD thy God would not hearken unto Balaam; but the LORD thy God turned the curse into a blessing unto thee, because the LORD thy God loved thee.”
  • See the introductory notes to 1 Pet in the Scofield Bible.
  • N1 p147 to Leviticus 16.5. “And he shall take of the congregation of the children of Israel two kids of the goats for a sin offering, and one ram for a burnt offering.” (The two goats. The offering of the high priest for himself has no anti-type in Christ Heb 7:26-27. The typical interest centres upon the two goats and the high priest. Typically (1) all is done by the high priest Heb 1:3 “by Himself”), the people only bring the sacrifice Mt 26:47; 27:24-25. (2) The goat slain (Jehovah’s lot) is that aspect of Christ’s work which vindicates the holiness and righteousness of God as expressed in the law Ro 3:24-26 and is (3) The living goat typifies that aspect of Christ’s work which puts away our sins from before God Heb 9:26; Ro 8:33-34. (4) The high priest entering the holiest, typifies Christ entering “heaven itself” with “His own blood” for us Heb 9:11-12. His blood makes that to be a “throne of grace,” and “mercy seat” which else must have been a throne of judgment. (5) For us, the priests of the New Covenant, there is what Israel never had, a rent veil Mt 27:51; Heb 10:19-20. So that, for worship and blessing, we enter, in virtue of His blood, where He is, into the holiest Heb 4:14-16; 10:19-22.
    The atonement of Christ, as interpreted by the O.T. sacrificial types, has these necessary elements:(1) It is substitutionary–the offering takes the offerer’s place in death. (2) The law is not evaded but honored–every sacrificial death was an execution of the sentence of the law. (3) The sinlessness of Him who bore our sins is expressed in every animal sacrifice–it must be without blemish. (4) The effect of the atoning work of Christ is typified (a) in the promises, “it shall be forgiven him”; and (b) in the peace-offering, the expression of fellowship–the highest privilege of the saint. Cmt. on Ex 29:33)
  • N1 p148 to Leviticus 16.6. “And Aaron shall offer his bullock of the sin offering, which is for himself, and make an atonement for himself, and for his house.” (Atonement. The biblical use and meaning of the word must be sharply distinguished from its use in theology. In theology it is term which covers the whole sacrificial and redemptive work of Christ. In the O.T. atonement is the English word used to translate the Hebrew words which mean “cover,” “coverings,” or “to cover.” Atonement (at-one-ment) is, therefore, not a translation of the hebrew, but a purely theologic concept. The Levitical offerings “covered” the sins of Israel until, and in anticipation of the Cross, but did not “take away” Heb 10:4 those sins. These were the “sins done aforetime” (“covered” meantime by the Levitical sacrifices), which God “passed over” Ro 3:25 for which “passing over” God’s righteousness was never vindicated until, in the Cross, Jesus Christ was “set forth a propitiation.” See “Propitiation,” on Ro 3:25. It was the Cross, not the Levitical sacrifices which made “at-one-ment.” The O.T. sacrifices enabled God to go on with a guilty people because they typified the Cross. To the offerer they were the confession of his desert of death, and the expression of his faith; to God they were the “shadows” Heb 10:1 of which Christ was the reality. Margin: atonement Cmt. on Ex 29:33.)
  • N1, 2 p150 to Leviticus 17.11. “Leviticus 17:11 For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul.” ((1) The value of the “life” is the measure of the value of the “blood.” This gives the blood of Christ its inconceivable value. When it was shed the sinless God-man gave His life. “It is not possible that the blood of bulls and of goats could take away sins” Heb 10:4. (2) it is not the blood in the veins of the sacrifice, but the blood upon the altar which is efficacious. The Scripture knows nothing of salvation by the imitation or influence of Christ’s life, but only by that life yielded up on the cross.
    2 The meaning of all sacrifice is here explained. Every offering was an execution of the sentence of the law upon a substitute for the offender, and every such offering pointed forward to that substitutional death of Christ which alone vindicated the righteousness of God in passing over the sins of those who offered the typical sacrifices Ro 3:24-25; Ex 29:36. Margin: Cmt. on Ex 29:33.)
  • N3 p157 to Leviticus 23.27. “Also on the tenth day of this seventh month there shall be a day of atonement: it shall be an holy convocation unto you; and ye shall afflict your souls, and offer an offering made by fire unto the LORD.” (The day of Atonement, Le 23:26-32. The day is the same described in Lev. 16., but here the stress is laid upon the sorrow and repentance of Israel. In other words, the prophetical feature is made prominent, and that looks forward to the repentance of Israel after her regathering under the Palestinian Covenant, De 30:1-10 preparatory to the second advent of Messiah and the establishment of the kingdom. See the connection between the “trumpet” in Joe 2:1 and the mourning which follows in verses Joe 2:11-15. Also Zec 12:10-13 in connection with the atonement of Zec 13:1. Historically the “fountain” of Zec 13.1 was opened at the crucifixion, but rejected by the Jews of that and the succeeding centuries. After the regathering of Israel the fountain will be efficaciously “opened” to Israel. n: atonementCmt. on Ex 29:33.)
  • N2p195

Babylon:

  • N2 to Is. 13.1, pp. 724-5 “The burden of Babylon, which Isaiah the son of Amoz did see.”, p724 (The city, Babylon is not in view here, as the immediate context shows. It is important to note the significance of the name when used symbolically. “Babylon” is the Greek form: invariably in the O.T. Hebrew the word is simply Babel, the meaning of which is confusion, and in this sense the word is used symbolically. (1) In the prophets, when the actual city is not meant, the reference is to the “confusion” into which the whole social order of the world has fallen under Gentile world-domination. (See “Times of the Gentiles,” Lu 21:24; “Re 16:14 gives the divine view of the welter of warring Gentile powers. The divine order is given in Isa. 11. Israel in her own land, the centre of the divine government of the world and channel of the divine blessing; and the Gentiles blessed in association with Israel. Anything else is, politically, mere “babel.” (2) In Re 14:8-11; 16:19 the Gentile world-system is in view in connection with Armageddon “Re 16:14; 19:21 while in Re 17. the reference is to apostate Christianity, destroyed by the nations Re 17:16 headed up under the Beast Da 7:8; Re 19:20 and false prophet. In Isaiah the political Babylon is in view, literally as to the then existing city, and symbolically as to the times of the Gentiles. In the Revelation both the symbolical-political and symbolical-religious Babylon are in view, for there both are alike under the tyranny of the Beast. Religious Babylon is destroyed by political Babylon Re 17:16 political Babylon by the appearing of the Lord Re 19:19-21. That Babylon the city is not to be rebuilt is clear from Isa 13:19-22; Jer 51:24-26,62-64. By political Babylon is meant the Gentile world-system. (See “World,” Joh 7:7; Re 13:8) It may be added that, in Scripture symbolism, Egypt stands for the world as such; Babylon for the world of corrupt power and corrupted religion; Nineveh for the pride, the haughty glory of the world.).
  • 13.17-22. The destruction of “Babylon.”
  • N1 to Is. 13.19, p725 “And Babylon, the glory of kingdoms, the beauty of the Chaldees’ excellency, shall be as when God overthrew Sodom and Gomorrah.” (Verses 12-16 look forward to the apocalyptic judgments (Re 6.-13.). Verses 17-22 have a near and far view. They predict the destruction of the literal Babylon then existing; with the further statement that, once destroyed, Babylon should never be rebuilt (cf) Jer 51:61-64. All of this has been literally fulfilled. But the place of this prediction in a great prophetic strain looks forward to the destruction of both politico-Babylon and ecclesio-Babylon in the time of the Beast shows that the destruction of the actual Babylon typifies the greater destruction yet to come upon the mystical Babylons. Cf. Cmt. on Isa 13:1. Margin: Babylon See note #2; Cmt. on Isa 13:1.)
  • 14.18-27: Judgment of “Babylon.”
  • N1 to Is. 14.26, p727: “This is the purpose that is purposed upon the whole earth: and this is the hand that is stretched out upon all the nations.” (This universality is significant and marks the whole passage as referring, not merely to a near judgment upon Assyria, but in a yet larger sense to the final crash of the present world-system at the end of the age. (See “Times of the Gentiles,” Lu 21:24; Re 16:14; Da 2:44-45 “Armageddon,” Re 16:14; 19:17. No other such universal catastrophe on the nations is known to Scripture.)
  • N1 to Re. 18.2, p1346 “And he cried mightily with a strong voice, saying, Babylon the great is fallen, is fallen, and is become the habitation of devils, and the hold of every foul spirit, and a cage of every unclean and hateful bird.” (Babylon, “confusion,” is repeatedly used by the prophets in a symbolic sense (Cmt. on Isa 13:2), note #2. Two “Babylons” are to be distinguished in the Revelation: ecclesiastical babylon, which is apostate Christendom, headed up under the Papacy; and political babylon, which is the Beast’s confederated empire, the last form of Gentile world-dominion. Ecclesiastical Babylon is “the great whore” Re 17:1 and is destroyed by political Babylon Re 17:15-18 that the beast may be the alone object of worship. 2Th 2:3-4; Re 13:15. The power of political Babylon is destroyed by the return of the Lord in glory. (See “Armageddon,”) “>Re 16:14; 19:17. The notion of a literal Babylon to be rebuilt on the site of ancient Babylon is in conflict with Isa 13:19-22. But the language of Re 18:10,16,18 seems beyond question to identify “Babylon,” the “city” of luxury and traffic, with “Babylon” the ecclesiastical centre, viz. Rome. The very kings who hate ecclesiastical Babylon deplore the destruction of commercial Babylon.)
  • N3 p1348 to Re. 19.11 “Revelation 19:11 And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse; and he that sat upon him was called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he doth judge and make war.” (The vision is of the departure from heaven of Christ and the saints and angels preparatory to the catastrophe in which Gentile world-power, headed up in the Beast, is smitten by the “stone cut out without hands,” Da 2:34-35. Margin: white horse Contra, Re 6:2; Ps 45:4, contra, Mt 21:2-5. Margin: Day of the Lord (Day of Jehovah) vs. Isa 2:10-22; 4:1-6; 11:10-13; 13:9-16; 24:21-23; 26:20; 63:1-6; 66:15-24; Re 19:11-21.)
  • Babylonian captivity foretold: 21; 25.1-14 (the 70 yr. captivity prophecy).

Baptism, baptize:

  • See A Short History of the Baptists, Henry C. Vedder, Judson Press, Valley Forge, 1907, pp 46- (The origin of infant baptism and baptismal regeneration. “Nothing in the history of the church did so much as this departure from apostolic precedent to prepare the way for the papacy. It introduced into the church a multitude whose hearts were unchanged by the Spirit of God, who were worldly in aims and in life, and who sought for the worldly advancement of the church that thus their own power and importance might be magnified. This consummation was doubtless aided and hastened by the rapid contemporary growth of the church in numbers and its increase in worldly prosperity.” At p 50.).
    Thomas Armitage, The History of the Baptists, Volume 1, “Chapter V. The King in Zion—Laws of the New Kingdom.” see esp. pp. 68-70 deals with baptism, discipleship, infant baptism (excellent).
    1. “4 John did baptize in the wilderness, and preach the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins. 5 And there went out unto him all the land of Judea, and they of Jerusalem, and were all baptized of him in the river of Jordan, confessing their sins. 8 I indeed have baptized you with water: but he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost. 9 And it came to pass in  those  days, that Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, and was baptized of John in Jordan.”
    John 1 “26 John answered them, saying, I baptize with water: but there standeth one among you, whom ye know not; 31And I knew him not: but that he should be made manifest to Israel, therefore am I come baptizing with water. 33 And I knew him not: but he that sent me to baptize with water, the same said unto me, Upon whom thou shalt see the Spirit descending, and remaining on him, the same is he which baptizeth with the Holy Ghost.” [See Jn. 1.25-34]
    John 3 “22 After these things came Jesus and his disciples into the land of Judaea; and there he tarried with them, and baptized. 23 And John also was baptizing in AEnon near to Salim, because there was much water there: and they came, and were baptized. 26 And they came unto John, and said unto him, Rabbi, he that was with thee beyond Jordan, to whom thou barest witness, behold, the same baptizeth, and all men come to him.” 4 “1 WHEN therefore the Lord knew how the Pharisees had heard that Jesus made and baptized more disciples that John, 2 (Though Jesus baptized not, but his disciples,) 3 He left Judaea, and departed again into Galilee.”
    Acts 1 “Wherefore of these men which have companied with us all the time that the Lord Jesus went in and out among us, 22 Beginning from the baptism of John, unto that same day that he was taken up from us, must one be ordained to be a witness with us of his resurrection.”
    Acts 2.14-41 (After Peter’s sermon, they asked “[W]hat shall we do?”.  Peter said, “Repent and be baptized * * * for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.” V38)
    Acts 3.19-20: Peter says to the nation, “Repent ye therefore, and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out, when the times of refreshing shall come from the presence of the Lord; And he shall send Jesus Christ, which before was preached unto you;”
    Acts 8.12-13: “But when they believed Philip preaching the things concerning the kingdom of God, and the name of Jesus Christ, they were baptized, both men and women. Then Simon himself believed also; and when he was baptized, he continued with Philip, and wondered, beholding the miracles and signs which were done.”
    Acts 22.16: [Ananias says to Paul] “And now why tarriest thou? Arise, and be baptized, and wash away thy sins, calling on the name of the Lord.”
    [Paul says] “For Christ sent me not to baptize, but the preach the gospel: not with wisdom of words, lest the cross of Christ should be made of none effect.”
    1 Peter 3.21: “The like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God,) by the resurrection of Jesus Christ:”
  • Acts 2.41
  • I just noticed the following in the perfect verses for (1) heretics who argue that water baptism is necessary for salvation, (2) heretics who argue that repentance is not necessary for salvation, (3) heretics who argue that one must work or have hands laid on them to receive the Holy Ghost, and (4) heretics who argue that salvation brings no change in one’s life.
  • In my Bible study in Acts tonight, some verses I was reading very distinctly clarify the order of salvation (believing on the Lord Jesus Christ and repentance), baptism with the Holy Ghost, and water baptism. In Acts 9, Peter preaches to the house of Cornelius in obedience to the commandment of God – God responding to the prayers of Cornelius. Reading Acts. 9.34-48 fills in part of what happened. Then, in Acts 11 Peter is explaining what had just happened in the house of Cornelius, a Gentile, to they of the circumcision in Jerusalem who contended with him on the salvation of Gentiles and says, as recorded in Acts 11.13-18:
  • “Acts 11:13-18  And he shewed us how he had seen an angel in his house, which stood and said unto him, Send men to Joppa, and call for Simon, whose surname is Peter; Who shall tell thee words, whereby thou and all thy house shall be saved. And as I began to speak, the Holy Ghost fell on them, as on us at the beginning. Then remembered I the word of the Lord, how that he said, John indeed baptized with water; but ye shall be baptized with the Holy Ghost. Forasmuch then as God gave them the like gift as he did unto us, who believed on the Lord Jesus Christ; what was I, that I could withstand God? When they heard these things, they held their peace, and glorified God, saying, Then hath God also to the Gentiles granted repentance unto life.”
  • hat they first believed, were baptized with the Holy Ghost, and then were baptized in water.
  • 1 Peter 3.21
  • 3.11
  • 1.16
  • Not one child in Scripture was baptized. How can a child have a good conscience toward God?
  • Excellent sermon which teaches on Catholic baptism is “Why Baptists Should Preach Against Rome: Infant Baptism” preached by Pastor Jason Cooley on April 16, 2014. [on facebook at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmDjVClC6Aw; on sermon audio at http://www.sermonaudio.com/source_detail.asp?sourceid=pastorcooley for April 16, 2014.]

Balaam: N1 p196 to Numbers 22.5 (The “way,” “error,” and “doctrine of Balaam.); N1, 2 p198; N2 p1332 (the doctrine of Balaam).

Beast, the: N2 p1349 to Rev. 19.20.

Blood, the: N1, 2 p150 to Leviticus 17.11. “Leviticus 17:11  For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul.” ((1) The value of the “life” is the measure of the value of the “blood.” This gives the blood of Christ its inconceivable value. When it was shed the sinless God-man gave His life. “It is not possible that the blood of bulls and of goats could take away sins” Heb 10:4. (2) it is not the blood in the veins of the sacrifice, but the blood upon the altar which is efficacious. The Scripture knows nothing of salvation by the imitation or influence of Christ’s life, but only by that life yielded up on the cross.
2 The meaning of all sacrifice is here explained. Every offering was an execution of the sentence of the law upon a substitute for the offender, and every such offering pointed forward to that substitutional death of Christ which alone vindicated the righteousness of God in passing over the sins of those who offered the typical sacrifices Ro 3:24-25; Ex 29:36. Margin: atonement. Cmt. on Ex 29:33.)
Blood of Christ: N1 p150 to Le. 17.1 “Leviticus 17:11  For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul.”((1) The value of the “life” is the measure of the value of the “blood.” This gives the blood of Christ its inconceivable value. When it was shed the sinless God-man gave His life. “It is not possible that the blood of bulls and of goats could take away sins” Heb 10:4. (2) it is not the blood in the veins of the sacrifice, but the blood upon the altar which is efficacious. The Scripture knows nothing of salvation by the imitation or influence of Christ’s life, but only by that life yielded up on the cross.
        2 blood. The meaning of all sacrifice is here explained. Every offering was an execution of the sentence of the law upon a substitute for the offender, and every such offering pointed forward to that substitutional death of Christ which alone vindicated the righteousness of God in passing over the sins of those who offered the typical sacrifices Ro 3:24-25; Ex 29:36. Margin: atonement. Cmt. on Ex 29:33.)
I Peter 1 “18 Forasmuch as ye know that ye were not redeemed with corruptible things, as silver and gold, from your vain conversation received by traditioin from your fathers; 19 But with the precious blood of Christ, as lf a lamb without blemish and without spot: 20 Who verily was foreordained before the foundation of the world, but was manifest in these last times for you.”

Carnal:

  • N1 p1200 to Ro. 7.14. Carnal = fleshly, is Paul’s word for the Adamic nature, and for the believer who “walks,” i.e. lives, under the power of it.
  • N2 to 1 Co. 2.14, p1213 and 1 Co. 3.1-4. “But the natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him: neither can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned.” (Paul divides men into three classes: psuchikos, “of the senses” Jas 3:15; Jude 1:19 or “natural,” i.e. the Adamic man, unrenewed through the new birth Joh 3:3,5 pneumatikos, “spiritual,” i.e. the renewed man as Spirit-filled and walking in the Spirit in full communion with God Eph 5:18-20 and sarkikos, “carnal,” “fleshly,” i.e. the renewed man who, walking “after the flesh,” remains a babe in Christ 1Co 3:1-4. The natural man may be learned, gentle, eloquent, fascinating, but the spiritual content of Scripture is absolutely hidden from him; and the fleshly, or carnal, Christian is able to comprehend only its simplest truths, “milk” 1Co 3:2.)

Chastisement of the believer: N1 p1222 (self-judgment avoids chastisement. If the Lord judges the believer, the result is chastisement and never condemnation.)

Chastisement of one’s children and other thoughts concerning children:

  • 19.18: “Chasten they son while there is hope, and let n ot thy soul spare for his crying.”
    Pro. 19.27: “Cease, my son, to hear the instruction that causeth to err from the words of knowledge.”
  • 20.11: “Even a child is known by his doings, whether his work be pure, and whether it be right.”
  • 20.30: “The blueness of a wound cleanseth away evil: so do stripes the inward parts of the belly.”
  • 20.20: “Whoso curseth his father or his mother, his lamp shall be put out in obscure darkness.”
  • 22.6: “Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it.”
  • 22.15: “Foolishness is bound in the heart of a child; but the rod of correction shall drive it far from him.”
  • 23.13-14: “Withhold not correction from the child: for if thou beatest him with the rod, he shall not die. Thou shalt beat him with the rod, and shalt deliver his soul from hell.”
  • 23.19-35: “Hear thou, my son, and be wise, and guide thine heart in the way. Be not among winebibbers: among riotous eaters of flesh: For the drunkard and the glutton shall come to poverty: and drowsiness shall clothe a man with rags. Hearken unto thy father that begat thee, and despise not thy mother when she is old. Buy the truth, and sell it not; also wisdom, and instruction, and understanding.  The father of the righteous shall greatly rejoice: and he that begetteth a wise child shall have joy of him.  Thy father and thy mother shall be glad, and she that bare thee shall rejoice.  My son, give me thine heart, and let thine eyes observe my ways.   For a whore is a deep ditch; and a strange woman is a narrow pit.  She also lieth in wait as for a prey, and increaseth the transgressors among men.  Who hat woe? Who hat sorrow? Who hath contentions? Who hat babbling? Who hat wounds without cause? Who hath redness of eyes? They that tarry long at the wine; they that go to seek mixed wine.  Look not thou upon the wine when it is red, when it giveth his colour in the cup, when it moveth itself aright.  At the last it biteth like a serpent, and stingeth like an adder.  Thine eyes shall behold strange women, and thine heart shall utter perverse things.  Yea, thou shalt be as he that lieth down in the midst of the sea, or as he that lieth upon the top of a mast.  They have striken me, shalt thou say, and I was not sick; they have beaten me, and I felt it not:  when  shall I awake? I will seek it yet again.” Etc.
  • 28.7: “Whoso keepeth the law is a wise son: but he that is a companion of riotous men shameth his father.”
  • 28.24: “Whoso robbeth his father or his mother, and saith, It is no transgression; the same is the companion of a destroyer.”
  • 29.15: “The rod and reproof give wisdom: but a child left to himself bringeth his mother to shame.”
  • 29.17: “Correct thy son, and he shall give thee rest; yea, he shall give delight unto thy soul.”

Cherubim: N1 p840; N2 p842.

Children of God, Sons of God:

  • N1 p768 to Isa. 63.16. Cf. Isa. 1,2; 648. Israel, collectively, the national Israel, recognized God as the national father (cf. Ex. 4.22, 23). Doubtless the believing Israelite was born anew (cf. John 3.3, 5 with Luke 13.28), but the O.T. Scriptures show no trace of the consciousness of personal sonship. the explanation is given in Gal. 4.1-7. The Israelite, though a child, “differed nothing from a servant.” The Spirit, as the “Spirit of His Son,” could not be given to impart the consciousness of sonship until redemption had been accomplished (Gal. 4.4-6). See “Adoption” (Rom. 8.15; Eph. 1.5).
  • 3.26 “For ye are all the children of God by faith in Christ Jesus.”
  • 8.14, 14-17, 21; Gal. 4-4-7; N2 p 1250 (adoption);

Christian giving: 2 Cor. 8,9; N1 p1235.

Circumcision:

  • 17.9-14 (Circumcision established as the sign of the Abrahamic Covenant.).
  • N1 p263 to Joshua 5.2: “Circumcision is the “sign” of the Abrahamic Covenant Ge 17:7-14 Ro 4:11. “The reproach of Egypt” was that, during the later years of the Egyptian bondage, this separating sign had been neglected (cf. Ex 4:24-26 and this neglect had continued during the wilderness wanderings. The N.T. analogue is world conformity; the failure openly to take a believer’s place with Christ in death and resurrection. Ro 6:2-11; Ga 6:14-16. Spiritually it is mortifying the deeds of the body through the Spirit. Ro 8:13; Ga 5:16-17; Col 2:11; 3:5-10.”

Commandments, the ten: n1 p93.

Communion (The Lord’s Supper):

  • 26.17-29; Mk. 14.12-25; Lk. 22.7-20; 1 Cor. 11.23-25.
  • N2 p1037 to Mt. 26.20: “The order of events on the night of the Passover supper appears to have been: (1) The taking by our Lord and the disciples of their places at the table; (2) the contention who should be greatest; (3) the feet washing; (4) the identification Judas as the traitor; (5) the withdrawal of Judas; (6) the institution of the supper; (7) the words of Jesus while still in the room Mt 26:26-29; Lu 22:35-38; Joh 13:3-35; Mt 14:1-31; (8) the words of Jesus between the room and the garden Mt 26:31-35; Mr 14:26-31; Joh 15:16-17 it seems probable that the high-priestly prayer Joh 17:1-26 was uttered after they reached the garden; (9) the agony in the garden; (10) the betrayal and arrest; (11) Jesus before Caiaphas; Peter’s denial.”

Consecration: N1 p396 to 1 Kings 8.1 (The consecration of the temple represents all consecration. The temple, like the believer, was threefold: The court, that which was outward, visible, answered to the body; the holy place, where everything appealed to the sacred emotions, answered to the soul; the holy of holies, the place of communion with God (Ex. 25.22), answered to the spirit of man.  The ark was the most all-inclusive type of Christ of any one of the vessels of the tabernacle (Ex. 25.9, note).  When, therefore, the priests  brought the ark into the court, the holy place, and the holy of holies, they were, in type, enthroning Christ over the body, with its powers and appetites; the soul, seat of the emotions and desires; and  the mind, seat of the capacity ot know tnd commune with God.  See Gen. 1.26, note 3.  In Christian experience this answere to Rom. 12.1-3; Eph. 5.18.)

Korah: Numbers 16, Jude 11.

N2 p188 to Numbers 16.10. “Seek ye the priesthood also.” The “gainsaying of Korah” was intrusion into the priest’s office (“no man taketh this honour unto himself,”) Heb 5:4. It was an attempt to create a priestly order without the divine authority Heb 5:10. The modern analogue is Nicolaitanism Re 2:6,15 the division of an equal brotherhood Mt 23:8 into “clergy” and “laity”; a vastly different thing from the due recognition of ministry-gifts # 1Co 12:4-31 Eph 4:8,11,12 or of elders and deacons 1Ti 3:1-13; Tit 1:5-9.

Covenant: N6 p5 (Edenic); N1 p9 (Adamic); Noahic Covenant N2 p16; Abrahamic N2 p20, N3 p24; [Gen. 17.6-14 (the Abrahamic Covenant confirmed & made everlasting & circumcision established as the sign of the Abrahamic Covenant); 22.15-24 (the Abrahamic Covenant confirmed), 26.1-5 (the Abrahamic Covenant confirmed to Isaac); 28 (the Abrahamic Covenant confirmed to Jacob)]; N1 p95 Mosaic Covenant; Deut. 30. 1-10 & N1, p250 (the Palestinian Covenant); 2 Sam. 7.8-17 and N1 p362; 1 Chr. 17.7-15. Davidic Covenant)

The New Covenant Summary: N1 p 1297; The eight Covenants summarized: N2 p 1297-9 (II. The relationship of Christ to the eight covenants given.)

Covetousness:

  • See McGee, Isaiah, p. 54. The sin of Israel was covetousness. Covetousness is idolatry. “Colossians 3:5 Mortify therefore your members which are upon the earth; fornication, uncleanness, inordinate affection, evil concupiscence, and covetousness, which is idolatry:”
  • 12.13-59. “13 And one of the company said unto him, Master, speak to my brother, that he divide the inheritance with me. 14 And he said unto him, Man, who made me a judge or a divider over you? 15 And he said unto them, Take heed, and beware of covetousness: for a man’s life consisteth not in the abundance of the things which he possesseth. [note all these verses] … 31 But rather seek ye the kingdom of God; and all these things shall be added unto you. … 34 For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.”
  • 14.33. “So likewise, whosoever he be of you that forsaketh not all that he hath, he cannot be my disciple.”
  • 16.13. “No servant can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and mammon.”
  • 18.29-30. “And he said unto them, Verily I say unto you, There is no man that hath left house, or parents, or brethren, or wife, or children, for the kingdom of God’s sake, Who shall not receive manifold more in this present time, and in the world to come life everlasting.”

Creation: N3 p5 (Man was created, not evolved, * * *. This declaration is confirmed by Christ (Mt. 19.4, Mk. 10.6).

Crucifixion:

  • N2 p608 to Psm. 22 (Psm. 22 is a graphic picture of death by crucifixion. * * *.).
  • Order of event on crucifixion day given in N1 to Mt. 26.57 p1039 “A comparison of the narratives gives the following order of events in the crucifixion day: (1) Early in the morning Jesus is brought before Caiaphas and the Sanhedrin. He is condemned and mocked Mt 26:57-68; Mr 14:55-65; Lu 22:63-71; Joh 18:19-24. (2) The Sanhedrin lead Jesus to Pilate, Mt 27:1-2,11-14; Mr 15:1-5; Lu 23:1-5; Joh 18:28-38. (3) Pilate sends Jesus to Herod Lu 23:6-12; Joh 19:4. (4) Jesus is again brought before Pilate, who releases Barabbas and delivers Jesus to be crucified Mt 27:15-26; Mr 15:6-15; Lu 23:13-25; Joh 18:39; 19:4-16. (5) Jesus is crowned with thorns and mocked Mt 27:26-30 Mr 15:15-20 Joh 19:1-3. (6) Suicide of Judas Mt 27:3-10. (7) Led forth to be crucified, the cross is laid upon Simon: Jesus discourses to the women Mt 27:31-32; Mr 15:20-23; Lu 23:26-33 Joh 19:16,17. For the order of events at the crucifixion Cmt. on Mt 27:33.”
  • The order of events at the crucifixion are given in N1 p1041 to Mt. 27.33. “The order of events at the crucifixion: (1) the arrival at Golgotha Mt 27:33; Mr 15:22; Lu 23:33; Joh 19:17. (2) the offer of the stupefying drink refused Mt 27:34; Mr 15:23. (3) Jesus is crucified between two thieves Mt 27:35-38; Mr 15:24-28; Lu 23:33-38; Joh 19:18-24. (4) He utters the first cry from the cross, “Father, forgive,” etc. Lu 23:34. (5) The soldiers part His garments Mt 27:35; Mr 15:24; Lu 23:34; Joh 19:23. (6) The Jews mock Jesus Mt 27:39-44; Mr 15:29-32; Lu 23:35-38. (7) The thieves rail on Him, but one repents and believes Mt 27:44; Mr 15:32; Lu 23:39-43. (8) The second cry from the cross, “To-day shalt thou be with me,” etc. Lu 23:43. (9) The third cry, “Woman, behold thy son” Joh 19:26-27. (10) The darkness Mt 27:45; Mr 15:33; Lu 23:44. (11) The fourth cry, “My God,” etc. Mt 27:46-47; Mr 15:34-36. (12) The fifth cry, “I thirst” Joh 19:28. (13) The sixth cry, “It is finished” Joh 19:30. (14) The seventh cry, “Father, into thy hands,” etc. Lu 23:46. (15) Our Lord dismisses his spirit Mt 27:50; Mr 15:37; Lu 23:46; Joh 19:30. Cmt. on Mt 26:57.”

Cyrus:

  • See N1(4) p907-8. Isaiah 41:2 “Who raised up the righteous man from the east, called him to his foot, gave the nations before him, and made him rule over kings? he gave them as the dust to his sword, and as driven stubble to his bow.” N1 p748 to Isa. 41.2: “The reference here seems to be to Cyrus, whose victories and rapid growth in power are here ascribed to the providence of God. Isa 41:5-7 describe the effect upon the nations of the rise of the Persian power. They heartened each other, and made (Isa 41:7) 7) new idols. At verse 8 the prophet addresses Israel. Since it was their God who raised up Cyrus, they should expect good, not evil, from him (Isa 41:8-20). Isa 41:21-24 form a contemptuous challenge to the idols in whom the nations are trusting.”
  • The prophecy concerning Cyrus, and the restoration under Ezra & Nehemiah: Isa. 44.28 & n1 thereto: Cf. I Ki. 13.2, where Josiah was mentioned by name 300 yrs. before his birth.
  • Isaiah 45.1-4 “1 Thus saith the LORD to his anointed, to Cyrus, whose right hand I have holden, to subdue nations before him; and I will loose the loins of kings, to open before him the two leaved gates; and the gates shall not be shut; 2 I will go before thee, and make the crooked places straight: I will break in pieces the gates of brass, and cut in sunder the bars of iron: 3 And I will give thee the treasures of darkness, and hidden riches of secret places, that thou mayest know that I, the LORD, which call thee by thy name, am the God of Israel. 4 For Jacob my servant’s sake, and Israel mine elect, I have even called thee by thy name: I have surnamed thee, though thou hast not known me.”
  • n2 p753 to Isa. 45.1: “The only instance where the word is applied to a Gentile. Nebuchadnezzar is called the ‘servant’ of Jehovah Jer 25:9; 27:6; 43:10 This, with the designation ‘My shepherd’ Isa 44:28 also a Messianic title, marks Cyrus as that startling exception, a Gentile type of Christ. The points are: (1) both are irresistible conquerors of Israel’s enemies. Isa 45:1; Re 19:19-21; (2) both are restorers of the holy city Isa 44:28; Zec 14:1-11; (3) through both is the name of the one true God glorified Isa 45:6; 1Co 15:28.”

Day: N1 & 2 to Gen. 1.5 “And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.” (N1 The word “day” is used in Scripture in three ways: (1) that part of the solar day of twenty-four hours which is light Ge 1:5,“>14; Joh 9:4; 11:9. (2) such a day, set apart for some distinctive purpose, as, “day of atonement” (Le 23:27); “day of judgment” Mt 10:15. (3) a period of time, long or short, during which certain revealed purposes of God are to be accomplished, as “day of the Lord.”(N2 The use of “evening” and “morning” may be held to limit “day” to the solar day; but the frequent parabolic use of natural phenomena may warrant the conclusion that each creative “day” was a period of time marked off by a beginning and ending.)

Day of Christ: N2 p1212 (scriptures referring to and meaning of and also contrasted with “day of the Lord.”

Deacons: The 1st deacons: Acts 6.1-7.

 

Death:

  • N3 to Ro. 5.12, p1197: “The first sin wrought the moral ruin of the race. The demonstration is simple. (1) Death is universal (Ro 4:12,14), all die: sinless infants, moral people, religious people, equally with the depraved. For a universal effect there must be a universal cause; that cause is a state of universal sin (Ro 5:12). (2) But this universal state must have had a cause. It did. The consequence of Adam’s sin was that “the many were made sinners” (Ro 5:19)–“By the offence of one judgment came upon all men unto condemnation” (Ro 5:18). (3) Personal sins are not meant here. From Adam to Moses death reigned (Ro 5:14), although, there being no law, personal guilt was not imputed (Ro 5:13). Accordingly, from Gen 4.7 to Ex 29.14 the sin-offering is not once mentioned. Then, since physical death from Adam to Moses was not due to the sinful acts of those who die (Ro 5:13), it follows that it was due to a universal sinful state, or nature, and that state is declared to be out inheritance from Adam. (4) the moral state of fallen man is described in Scripture Ge 6:5; 1Ki 8:46; Ps 14:1-3; 39:5; Jer 17:9; Mt 18:11; Mr 7:20,23; Ro 1:21; 2:1-29; 3:9-19; 7:24; 8:7; Joh 3:6; 1Co 2:14; 2Co 3:14; 4:4; Ga 5:19-21; Eph 2:1-3,11; 4:18-22; Col 1:21; Heb 3:13; Jas 4:14; 1Co 15:22.”
  • N1 to Ep. 2.5, p1251 “Even when we were dead in sins, hath quickened us together with Christ, (by grace ye are saved;)” “Death (spiritual), Summary: Spiritual death is the state of the natural or unregenerate man as still in his sins. Eph 2:1 alienated from the life of God Eph 4:18-19 and destitute of the Spirit. Prolonged beyond the death of the body, spiritual death is a state of eternal separation from God in conscious suffering. This is called “the second death.” Re 2:11; 20:6; 21:8.”
  • N1 to He. 9.27. p1299 “And as it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment:” “Death, physical, Summary: (1) Physical death is a consequence of sin Ge 3:19 and the universality of death proves the universality of sin Ro 5:12-14. (2) Physical death affects the body only, and is neither cessation of life nor of consciousness on Hab 2:5. Cmt. on Lu 16:23. Re 6:9-10. (3) All physical death ends in the resurrection of the body. See “Resurrection” Job 19:25. Cmt. on 1Co 15:52. (4) Because physical death is a consequence of sin, it is not inevitable to the redeemed Ge 5:24; 1Co 15:51-52; 1Th 4:15-17. (5) Physical death has for the believer a peculiar qualification. It is called “sleep,” because his body may be “awakened” at any moment Php 3:20-21; 1Th 4:14-18. (6) The soul and spirit live, independently of the death of the body, which is described as a “tabernacle” (tent), in which the “I” dwells, and which may be put off 2Co 5:1-8; 1Co 15:42-44; 2Pe 1:13-15. (7) At the believer’s death he is “clothed upon” with a “house from heaven” pending the resurrection of the “earthly house,” and is at once “with the Lord.” 2Co 5:1-8; Php 1:23; Lu 23:43.As to the death of Christ, Cmt. on Mt 27:50.”
  • N2 p1351 to Rev. 21.8 “Revelation 21:8 But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death.” “Second death, Summary: “The second death” and the “lake of fire” are identical terms Re 20:14 and are used of the eternal state of the wicked. It is “second” relative to the preceding physical death of the wicked in unbelief and rejection of God; their eternal state is one of eternal “death” (i.e. separation from God) in sins Joh 8:21,24. That the second death is not annihilation is shown by a comparison of Re 19:20; 20:10. After one thousand years in the lake of fire the Beast and False Prophet are still there, undestroyed. The words “forever and forever” (“to the ages of the ages”) are used in Heb 1:8 for the duration of the throne of God, eternal in the sense of unending.”
  • 65.1-16 tells of all the bad things Israel, the rebellious people had done. Isa. 65.17-25 tell of the eternal blessing of Israel in the new earth.
  • N1 p769 to Isa. 17 (Verse 17 looks beyond the kingdom-age to the new heavens and the new earth (see at “create”), but verses 18-25 describe the kingdom-age itself. Longevity is restored, but death, the “last enemy” (1 Cor. 15.26), is not destroyed till after Satan’s rebellion at the end of the thousand years (Rev. 20.7-14).
  • N1 to He. 9.27, p1299 “And as it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment:” “Death, physical, Summary:(1) Physical death is a consequence of sin Ge 3:19 and the universality of death proves the universality of sin (Ro 5:12-14). (2) Physical death affects the body only, and is neither cessation of life nor of consciousness ( on Hab 2:5. Cmt. on Lu 16:23. Re 6:9-10). (3) All physical death ends in the resurrection of the body. See “Resurrection” (Job 19:25. Cmt. on 1Co 15:52.(4) Because physical death is a consequence of sin, it is not inevitable to the redeemed Ge 5:24; 1Co 15:51-52; 1Th 4:15-17). (5) Physical death has for the believer a peculiar qualification. It is called “sleep,” because his body may be “awakened” at any moment (Php 3:20-21; 1Th 4:14-18). (6) The soul and spirit live, independently of the death of the body, which is described as a “tabernacle” (tent), in which the “I” dwells, and which may be put off (2Co 5:1-8; 1Co 15:42-44; 2Pe 1:13-15).(7) At the believer’s death he is “clothed upon” with a “house from heaven” pending the resurrection of the “earthly house,” and is at once “with the Lord.” (2Co 5:1-8; Php 1:23; Lu 23:43.) As to the death of Christ, Cmt. on Mt 27:50.”
  • N2 p 1351 to Rev. 21.8 “Revelation 21:8 But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death.”. (Second death, Summary: “The second death” and the “lake of fire” are identical terms Re 20:14 and are used of the eternal state of the wicked. It is “second” relative to the preceding physical death of the wicked in unbelief and rejection of God; their eternal state is one of eternal “death” (i.e. separation from God) in sins Joh 8:21,24. That the second death is not annihilation is shown by a comparison of Re 19:20; 20:10. After one thousand years in the lake of fire the Beast and False Prophet are still there, undestroyed. The words “forever and forever” (“to the ages of the ages”) are used in Heb 1:8 for the duration of the throne of God, eternal in the sense of unending.).

Dietary laws: Deut. 14.3-29.

Disciples, call of:

  • Peter and Andrew (disciples of John the Baptist), Philip, Nathanael in John 1.35-50. Peter & Andrew (Mt. 4.18-19; Mk. 1.16-20; Lk. 5.10, 11. Cf. John 1.35-42); James & John, sons of Zebedee (Mt. 4.20-25; Lk. 1.19-20); Matthew (Mt. 9.9-13; Mk. 2.14; Lk. 5.27-32).
  • The 12 apostles chosen: N1 p1008 to Mt. 10.2; Mk. 3.13-19; Lk. 6.12-19.
  • The 12 apostles ordained. Mk. 3.13-21.

Disciples: Some of Jesus’ disciples went back & walked no more with Him. Lk. 6.66.

Dispensation: N4, 5 p5 (1st innocence); N2 p10 (2d conscience); N1 p16 (3d human government); N1 p20 (4th-Promise); N1 p94 (5th law); (6th grace); N3 p1250 (of fullness of times); N1 p1341 (7th) dispensation of the Kingdom);

Drunkenness and drinking. See McGee, Isaiah, p. 55-56, 59, 60-61. The second woe, the second sin, of Israel.

Election:

  • See foreknowledge.
  • N1 p1311 to 1 Peter 1.2 “Election, Summary: In both Testaments the Hebrew and Greek words are rendered “elect,” “election,” “choose,” “chosen.” In all cases they mean, simply, “chosen,” or “to choose”; and are used of both human and divine choices. (1) In the latter use election is: (a) corporate, as of the nation of Israel, or the church Isa 45:4; Eph 1:4 and (b) individual 1Pe 1:2. (2) Election is according to the foreknowledge of God 1Pe 1:2 and wholly of grace, apart from human merit Ro 9:11; 11:5-6. (3) Election proceeds from the divine volition Joh 15:16.
  • “Election is, therefore: (1) The sovereign act of God in grace whereby certain are chosen from among mankind for Himself (Joh 15:19). (2) The sovereign act of God whereby certain elect persons are chosen for distinctive service for Him. (Lu 6:13; Ac 9:15; 1Co 1:27-28).”
  • N1 p1312 to I Peter 1.20 “Who verily was foreordained before the foundation of the world, but was manifest in these last times for you,” “The divine order is foreknowledge, election, predestination. That foreknowledge determines the election or choice is clear from 1Pe 1:2 and predestination is the bringing to pass of the election. “election looks back to foreknowledge; predestination forward to the destiny.” But Scripture nowhere declares what it is in the divine foreknowledge which determines the divine election and predestination. The foreknown are elected, and the elect are predestinated, and this election is certain to every believer by the mere fact that he believes 1Th 1:4-5. See Predestination on Eph 1:5.”

Edom: N1 p52.

Eternal life: N4 p1353 to Rev. 22.19 “And if any man shall take away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take away his part out of the book of life, and out of the holy city, and from the things which are written in this book.” (Eternal life, Summary of the teaching: (1) The life is called “eternal” because it was from the eternity which is past unto the eternity which is to come–it is the life of God revealed in Jesus Christ, who is God (John 1:4; 5:26; 1 John 1:1-2). (2) This life of God, which was revealed in Christ, is imparted in a new birth by the Holy Spirit, acting upon the word of God, to every believer on the Lord Jesus Christ (John 3:3-15). (3) The life thus imparted was from the beginning.” But the recipient is a “new creation” (2Cor.  5:17; Gal. 6:15). () The life of God which is the believer is an unsevered part of the life which eternally was, and eternally is, in Christ Jesus–one life, in Him and in the believer–Vine and branches; Head and members (1 Cor. 6:17; Ga 2:20; Col. 1:27; 3:3-4; 1 John 5:11-12; John 15:1-5; 1Cor.  12:12-14)).

Evil: N1 to Is. 45.7, p754 “I form the light, and create darkness: I make peace, and create evil: I the LORD do all these things.” “Heb. “ra” translated “sorrow,” “wretchedness,” “adversity,” “afflictions,” “calamities,” but never translated sin. God created evil only in the sense that He made sorrow, wretchedness, etc., to be the sure fruits of sin.”

Faith:

  • N2 p956
  • N1 p1302 to Hebrews 11.39 “And these all, having obtained a good report through faith, received not the promise:” “The essence of faith consists in receiving what God has revealed, and may be defined as that trust in the God of the Scriptures and in Jesus Christ whom He hath sent, which receives Him as Saviour and Lord, and impels to loving obedience and good works Joh 1:12; Jas 2:14-26. The particular uses of faith give rise to its secondary definitions: (1) For salvation, faith is personal trust, apart from meritorious works, in the Lord Jesus Christ, as delivered for our offences, and raised again for our justification Ro 4:5,23-25. (2) As used in prayer, faith is the “confidence that we have in him, that if we ask anything according to his will, he heareth us” 1Jo 5:14-15. (3) As used in reference to unseen things of which Scripture speaks, faith “gives substance” to them, so that we act upon the conviction of their reality. Heb 11:1-3. (4) As a working principle in life, the uses of faith are illustrated in Heb 11:1-39.”
  • Faith vs. Works: “The just shall live by his faith.” Hab. 2.4.  N2 p956 thereto: “This great evangelic word is applied to Jew and Gentile in Rom. 1.17; to the Gentiles in Gal. 3.11-14; and the Hebrews (especially) in Heb. 10.38. This opening to faith alone, makes possible not only the salvation of the Gentiles during the dispersion of Israel “among the nations” (Hab. 1.5: Gal. 3.11-14), but also makes possible a believing remnant in Israel while the nation, as such, is in blindness and unbeliever (Rom. 11.1-5, note), with neither priesthood nor temple, and consequently unable to keep the ordinances of the law. * * *.”
  • N1 p1083 (excellent note on this subject)(See Jas. 2.14-26. When Jesus would justify the woman in the eyes of Simon, He points to her works, for only through her works could Simon see the proof of her faith; but when He would send the woman away in peace, He points to her faith, not her works.  See Tit. 2.14; 3.4-8.  His own works can never be to the believer his own ground of assurance, which must rest upon the work of Christ (cf. Mt. 7.22, 23).  See “Assurance” (Isa. 32.17; Jude 1)).
  • 11.
  • N1 p1302 [to Heb. 11.39 “And these all, having obtained a good report through faith, received not the promise.”] “The essence of faith consists in receiving what God has revealed, and may be defined as that trust in the God of the Scriptures and in Jesus Christ whom He hath sent, which receives Him as Saviour and Lord, and impels to loving obedience and good works Joh 1:12; Jas 2:14-26. The particular uses of faith give rise to its secondary definitions: (1) For salvation, faith is personal trust, apart from meritorious works, in the Lord Jesus Christ, as delivered for our offences, and raised again for our justification Ro 4:5,23-25. (2) As used in prayer, faith is the “confidence that we have in him, that if we ask anything according to his will, he heareth us” 1Jo 5:14-15. (3) As used in reference to unseen things of which Scripture speaks, faith “gives substance” to them, so that we act upon the conviction of their reality. Heb 11:1-3. (4) As a working principle in life, the uses of faith are illustrated in Heb 11:1-39.”

False prophets & teachers:

  • The test of the Prophets: Deuteronomy 18:20-22: “But the prophet, which shall presume to speak a word in my name, which I have not commanded him to speak, or that shall speak in the name of other gods, even that prophet shall die. And if thou say in thine heart, How shall we know the word which the LORD hath not spoken? When a prophet speaketh in the name of the LORD, if the thing follow not, nor come to pass, that is the thing which the LORD hath not spoken, but the prophet hath spoken it presumptuously: thou shalt not be afraid of him.”
    Jeremiah 14.13-16.
  • 23.11-40.
  • Jeremiah 28. Hananiah falsely prophecies that the yoke of Nebuchadnezzar shall be broken within 2 yrs. etc. Jeremiah tells him he will die because of his false prophecies.  Hananiah dies.
  • 29. God tells the people what to do in captivity, including what will happen to false prophets that rise up, even naming some and what will happen to them.
  • Ezekiel 13. Ezekiel’s message from God against the lying prophets.
  • See “Beware of Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing” by Robert McCurry (filed in my bookcase)(“The following illusions are made to the wolf in Scriptures: Its ferocity is mentioned in Gen. 49.27; Ezek. 22.27; Hab. 1.8; 7.15; its prowling in the night in Jer. 5.6; Zeph. 3.3; Hab. 1.8; its attacking sheep in John 10.12; Matt. 10.16; Luke 10.3. “The figurative speech of he wolf in the Scriptures applies to the wicked (Matt. 10.16; Luke 10.3); wicked rulers (Ezek. 22.27; Zeph. 3.3); of false teachers (Matt. 10.16; 7.15; Acts 20.29); of the devil (John 10.12); and fierce enemies (Jer. 5.6; Hab. 1.8).
  • 13 “2 And it shall come to pass in that day, saith the LORD of hosts, that I will cut off the names of the idols out of the land, and they shall no more be remembered: and also I will cause the prophets and the unclean spirit to pass out of the land. 3 And it shall come to pass, that when any shall yet prophesy, then his father and his mother that begat him shall say unto him, thou shalt not live; for thou speakest lies in the name of the LORD: and his father and his mother that begat him shall thrust him through when he prophesieth. 4 And it shall come to pass in that day, that the prophets shall be ashamed every one of his vision, when he hath prophesied; neither shall they wear a rough garment to deceive: But he shall say, I am an husbandman; for man taught me to keep cattle from my youth.”
  • “The patriarch Jacob spoke of his youngest son Benjamin as a ravenous wolf (Gen. 49.27). ‘Benjamin shall ravin as a wolfe: in the morning he shall devour the prey, and at night he shall divide the spoil.’ * * *” [article goes on to describe the wolf and wolves in the church in detail.]).
  • “For both the prophet and priest are profane: yea, in my house have I found their wickedness, saith the LORD. * * *. 36b for ye have perverted the words of the living God, of the LORD of hosts our God. * * *.” Jer. 23.11-40.
  • 7.15-20 (“Beware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep’s clothing . . . .” See also Eze. 22.27 & surrounding verses.).
  • Acts 20.28-31 (“I have not ceased to warn every one night and day with tears.”).
    2 Cor. 11.13-15.
  • 2 Pet. 2.1-22
  • 1 John 2.18-28: The children warned against apostates who deny the true deity of Christ.
    1 John 4.1-10.
  • 2 John 7-11.
  • “In this brief letter, the apostasy of the professing church is predicted, and the cause and course described. As in 2nd Timothy and 2nd Peter the apostasy is treated as having already set in.” Headnote to Jude. Notice that in explaining the apostasy of the church, Jude uses Old Testament examples to describe it.

Famine. This famine (in Is. 3.1) is a judgment of God. There are 15 famines mentioned in the Word of God, and every one of them is a judgment from Him upon the nation of Israel” McGee, Is. V1, p40.

Feasts to the Lord:

  • 16.1-22.
  • Ns1-5 p156 to Leviticus 23.2, 5, 6, 10, 16. “2 Speak unto the children of Israel, and say unto them, Concerning the feasts of the LORD, which ye shall proclaim to be holy convocations, even these are my feasts.” ( The feasts of Jehovah. As given to Israel, these were simply seven great religious festivals which were to be observed every year. The first three verses of Lev. 23. do not relate to the feasts but separate the sabbath from the feasts.)
    In the fourteenth day of the first month at even is the LORD’S passover.” (2 The Passover, Le 23:4-5. This feast is memorial and brings into view redemption, upon which all blessing rests. Typically, it stands for “Christ our passover, sacrificed for us.” 1Co 5:7. Margin: first month i.e. April.)
    Ns1-3 p157
    N3 p157 to Leviticus 23.27. “Also on the tenth day of this seventh month there shall be a day of atonement: it shall be an holy convocation unto you; and ye shall afflict your souls, and offer an offering made by fire unto the LORD.” The day of Atonement, Le 23:26-32. The day is the same described in Lev. 16., but here the stress is laid upon the sorrow and repentance of Israel. In other words, the prophetical feature is made prominent, and that looks forward to the repentance of Israel after her regathering under the Palestinian Covenant, De 30:1-10 preparatory to the second advent of Messiah and the establishment of the kingdom. See the connection between the “trumpet” in Joe 2:1 and the mourning which follows in verses Joe 2:11-15. Also Zec 12:10-13 in connection with the atonement of Zec 13:1. Historically the “fountain” of Zec 13.1 was opened at the crucifixion, but rejected by the Jews of that and the succeeding centuries. After the regathering of Israel the fountain will be efficaciously “opened” to Israel. Margi. n: atonementCmt. on Ex 29:33.)
  • N1 p158
  • N1 p234.

Fire: N1 p127 (symbol of God’s holiness, etc.)

Flesh:

  • N3 p91 (Amalek, grandson of Esau, a type of the flesh. The resources of man under law); N1, 2 p1200;.
    Conflict of the spirit w/the flesh. Ro. 8.5-13.
  • Law vs. grace. N1 p113.
  • N3 p1329 to Jude 23 “And others save with fear, pulling them out of the fire; hating even the garment spotted by the flesh.” (Flesh, Summary: “Flesh,” in the ethical sense, is the whole natural or unregenerate man, spirit, soul, and body, as centered upon self, prone to sin, and opposed to God Ro 7:18. The regenerate man is not “in the sphere of the flesh,” but in the sphere of the Spirit Ro 8:9 but the flesh is still in him, and he may, according to his choice, “walk after the flesh” or “in the Spirit” 1Co 3:1-4; Ga 5:16-17. In the first case he is a “carnal,” in the second a “spiritual,” Christian. Victory over the flesh will be the habitual experience of the believer who walks in the Spirit Ro 8:2,4; Ga 5:16-17.)

Fool: N1 p678 (Pro. 10.1)(A “fool” in scripture is never a mentally deficient person, but rather one arrogant and self-sufficient; one who orders his life as if there is no God. Etc.)

Foreknowledge, Election, Predestination: N1 p1250 (Predestination); N1 p 1311 (Election); N1 p1312.

Forgiveness:

  • N2 p999 at 1000
  • N1 p1002;
  • N1 to Mt. 26.28, p1038 “For this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins.” (Forgiveness. Summary: The Greek word translated “remission” in Mt 26:28; Ac 10:43; Heb 9:22 is elsewhere rendered “forgiveness.” It means, to send off, or away. And this, throughout Scripture, is the one fundamental meaning of forgiveness–to separate the sin from the sinner. Distinction must be made between divine and human forgiveness: (1) Human forgiveness means the remission of penalty. In the Old Testament and the New, in type and fulfilment, the divine forgiveness follows the execution of the penalty. “The priest shall make an atonement for his sin that he had committed, and it shall be forgiven him” Le 4:35. “This is my blood of the new covenant, which is shed for many for the remission sending away, forgiveness of sins” (Mt 25:28). “Without shedding of blood there is no remission” Heb 9:22. See “Sacrifice” on Ge 4:4; Ge 4:4 Cmt. on Heb 10:18. The sin of the justified believer interrupts his fellowship, and is forgiven upon confession, but always on the ground of Christ’s propitiating sacrifice 1Jo 1:6-9; 2:2. (2) Human forgiveness rests upon and results from the divine forgiveness. In many passages this is assumed rather than stated, but the principle is declared in Eph 4:32; Mt 18:32-33. Margin: sins Sin. Cmt. on Ro 3:23.)
  • 11.26 (if you do not forgive, your heavenly father won’t forgive you): “Forgiveness. Summary: The Greek word translated “remission” in Mt 26:28; Ac 10:43; Heb 9:22 is elsewhere rendered “forgiveness.” It means, to send off, or away. And this, throughout Scripture, is the one fundamental meaning of forgiveness–to separate the sin from the sinner. Distinction must be made between divine and human forgiveness: (1) Human forgiveness means the remission of penalty. In the Old Testament and the New, in type and fulfilment, the divine forgiveness follows the execution of the penalty. “The priest shall make an atonement for his sin that he had committed, and it shall be forgiven him” Le 4:35. “This is my blood of the new covenant, which is shed for many for the remission sending away, forgiveness of sins” (Mt 25:28). “Without shedding of blood there is no remission” Heb 9:22. See “Sacrifice” Cmt. on Ge 4:4; Ge 4:4 Cmt. on Heb 10:18. The sin of the justified believer interrupts his fellowship, and is forgiven upon confession, but always on the ground of Christ’s propitiating sacrifice 1Jo 1:6-9; 2:2. (2) Human forgiveness rests upon and results from the divine forgiveness. In many passages this is assumed rather than stated, but the principle is declared in Eph 4:32; Mt 18:32-33.”

Lu. 17: 3-6: Jesus instructs his disciples on forgiveness. If a brother trespass against thee, rebuke him.  If he repents, forgive him..

Fruit: 3 conditions of the fruitful life: N2 p1136. 3 degrees of fruit bearing: N1 p1137.

Giving: N1 p1235 to 2 Cor. 8.1 (Christian giving). “In 2 Cor. 8., 9., the apostle sums up the Christian doctrine of giving. It may be thus summarized: (1) It is a “grace,” i.e. a disposition created by the Spirit 2Co 8:7. (2) In contrast with the law, which imposed giving as a divine requirement, Christian giving is voluntary, and a test of sincerity and love 2Co 8:8-12; 9:1-2,5,7. (3) The privilege is universal, belonging, according to ability, to rich and poor 2Co 8:1-3,12-15; 1Co 16:1-2. (4) Giving is to be proportioned to income 2Co 8:12-14; 1Co 16:2. The O.T. proportion was the tithe, a proportion which antedates the law Ge 14:20. (5) The rewards of Christian giving are (a) joy 2Co 8:2; (b) increased ability to give in proportion to that which has been already given 2Co 9:7-11; (c) increased thankfulness to God 2Co 9:12; (d) God and the Gospel glorified 2Co 9:13-14.”

Gnostics: N1 p 1264 to Eph. 2.18.

Golden Rule: Mt. 7.12 “Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets.” Margin: Mt. 5.7; 18.23-25; Lk. 6.31.

Gospel, the: N1 p1343 to Revelation 14.6 “Revelation 14:6  And I saw another angel fly in the midst of heaven, having the everlasting gospel to preach unto them that dwell on the earth, and to every nation, and kindred, and tongue, and people,”
“Gospel. This great theme may be summarized as follows:
I. In itself the word Gospel means good news.
II. Four forms of the Gospel are to be distinguished”
(1)          The Gospel of the kingdom. This is the good news that God purposes to set up on the earth, in fulfilment of the Davidic Covenant 2Sa 7:16 a kingdom, political, spiritual, Israelitish, universal, over which God’s Son, David’s heir, shall be King, and which shall be, for one thousand years, the manifestation of the righteousness of God in human affairs. Cmt. on Mt 3:2. Two preachings of this Gospel are mentioned, one past, beginning with the ministry of John the Baptist, continued by our Lord and His disciples, and ending with the Jewis rejection of the King. The other is yet future Mt 24:14 during the great tribulation, and immediately preceding the coming of the King in glory.
(2) The Gospel of the grace of God. This is the good news that Jesus Christ, the rejected King, has died on the cross for the sins of the world, that He was raised from the dead for our justification, and that by Him all that believe are justified from all things. This form of the Gospel is described in many ways. It is the Gospel “of God” Ro 1:1 because it originates in His love; “of Christ” 2Co 10:14 because it flows from His sacrifice, and because He is the alone Object of Gospel faith; of the “grace of God” Ac 20:24 because it saves those whom the law curses; of “the glory” 1Ti 1:11; 2Co 4:4 because it concerns Him who is in the glory, and who is bringing the many sons to glory Heb 2:10 of “our salvation” Eph 1:13 because it is the “power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth” Ro 1:16 of “the uncircumcision” Ga 2:7 because it saves wholly apart from forms and ordinances of “peace” Eph 6:15 because through Christ it makes peace between the sinner and God, and imparts inward peace.
(3) The everlasting Gospel Re 14:6. This is to be preached to the earth-dwellers at the very end of the great tribulation and immediately preceding the judgment of the nations Mt 15:31. It is neither the Gospel of the kingdom, nor of grace. Though its burden is judgment, not salvation, it is good news to Israel and to those who, during the tribulation, have been saved Re 7:9-14; Lu 21:28; Ps 96:11-13; Isa 35:4-10.
(4) That which Paul calls, “my Gospel” Ro 2:16. This is the Gospel of the grace of God in its fullest development, but includes the revelation of the result of that Gospel in the outcalling of the church, her relationships, position, privileges, and responsibility. It is the distinctive truth of Ephesians and Colossians, but interpenetrates all of Paul’s writings.
III. There is “another Gospel” Ga 1:6; 2Co 11:4 “which is not another,” but a perversion of the Gospel of the grace of God, against which we are warned. It has many seductive forms, but the test is one–it invariably denies the sufficiency of grace alone to save, keep, and perfect, and mingles with grace some kind of human merit. In Galatia it was law, in Colosse fanaticism Col 2:18, etc. In any form its teachers lie under the awful anathema of God. Margin: angel Cmt. on Heb 1:4.”

Government: In the wilderness, Moses alone, initially, as per God’s instruction, judged the people.  But his father in  law suggested another method in Exodus 18.19-23.  Moses acted accordingly and Jehovah entirely ignored this world-wise organization (See N1 p 93).  1 Pet. 2.4 (purpose of).
        God told the nation that the should have one law and one manner for them and for the stranger that sojourneth with them.  See, e.g., Numbers 9.14, 15.14-16.

Groves: N1 p290 (have been associated w/idolatry from time immemorial. Etc.)

Hades, hell, paradise and Abraham’s bosom:

  • N1to Habakkuk 2.5, p956 “Yea also, because he transgresseth by wine, he is a proud man, neither keepeth at home, who enlargeth his desire as hell, and is as death, and cannot be satisfied, but gathereth unto him all nations, and heapeth unto him all people:” (Sheol is, in the O.T., the place to which the dead go.(1) Often, therefore, it is spoken of as the equivalent of the grave, merely, where all human activities cease; the terminus toward which all human life moves (e.g. Ge 42:38 grave Job 14:13 grave Ps 88:3 (2) To the man “under the sun,” the natural man, who of necessity judges from appearances, sheol seems no more than the grave– the end and total cessation, not only of the activities of life, but of life itself. Ec 9:5,10. (3) But Scripture reveals sheol as a place of sorrow 2Sa 22:6; Ps 18:5,3 in which the wicked are turned Ps 9:17 and where they are fully conscious Isa 14:9-17; Eze 32:21 see, especially, Jon 2:2 what the belly of the great fish was to Jonah that sheol is to those who are therein). The sheol of the O.T. and hades of the N.T. Cmt. on Lu 16:23 are identical.).
  • N1 to Luke 16.23, p1098 “And in hell he lift up his eyes, being in torments, and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.” (Gr. hades, “the unseen world,” is revealed as the place of departed human spirits between death and resurrection. The word occurs, Mt 11:23; 16:18; Lu 10:15; Ac 2:27,31; Re 1:18; 6:8; 20:13-14 and is the equivalent of the O.T. “sheol.” on Hab 2:5. The Septuagint invariably renders sheol by hades.
    Summary: (1) Hades before the ascension of Christ. The passages in which the word occurs make it clear that hades was formerly in two divisions, the abodes respectively of the saved and of the lost. The former was called “paradise” and “Abraham’s bosom.” Both designations were Talmudic, but adopted by Christ in Lu 16:22; 23:43. The blessed dead were with Abraham, they were conscious and were “comforted” Lu 16:25. The believing malefactor was to be, that day, with Christ in “paradise.” The lost were separated from the saved by a “great gulf fixed” Lu 16:26. The representative man of the lost who are now in hades is the rich man of Lu 16:19-31. He was alive, conscious, in the full exercise of his faculties, memory, etc., and in torment. (2) Hades since the ascension of Christ. So far as the unsaved dead are concerned, no change of their place or condition is revealed in Scripture. At the judgment of the great white throne, hades will give them up, they will be judged, and will pass into the lake of fire Re 20:13-14. But a change has taken place which affects paradise. Paul was “caught up to the third heaven. . .into paradise” 2Co 12:1-4. Paradise, therefore, is now in the immediate presence of God. It is believed that Eph 4:8-10 indicates the time of the change. “When he ascended up on high he led a multitude of captives.” It is immediately added that He had previously “descended first into the lower parts of the earth,” i.e. the paradise division of Hades. During the present church-age the saved who died are “absent from the body, at home with the Lord.” The wicked dead in hades, and the righteous dead “at home with the Lord,” alike await the resurrection Job 19:25; 1Co 15:52. Cmt. on Mt 5:22.).

Heart: “The heart is deceitful above all things, and  desperately wicked, who can know it?  I the LORD search the heart, I try the reins, even to give every man according to his ways, and according to the fruit of his doings.” Jere. 17.9-10.
“But those things which proceed out of the mouth come forth from the heart; and they defile the man. For out of the heart proceed evil thoughts, murders, adulteries, fornications, thefts, false witness blasphemies;” Mt. 15.18-19;
“And he said, That which cometh out of the man, that defileth the man. (21) For from within, out of the heart of men, proceed evil thoughts, adulteries, fornications, murders, (22) Thefts, covetousness, wickedness, deceit, lasciviousness, an evil eye, blasphemy, pride, foolishness: (23) all these evil things come from within, and defile the man.” Mk. 7.20-23.

Heaven: N2 p 1113.

Hell:

  • See MeGee, Isaiah, p57.
  • N3 p956 (explains sheol, used in OT, and hade, used in NT).
  • N2 p1000 to Mat. 5.22 “Matthew 5:22 But I say unto you, That whosoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment: and whosoever shall say to his brother, Raca, shall be in danger of the council: but whosoever shall say, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hell fire.” [Gr. “Geenna” = Gehenna, the place in the valley of Hinnom where, anciently, human sacrifices were offered. 2Ch 33:6; Jer 7:31 The word occurs, Mt 5:22,29; 10:28; 18:9; 23:15,33; Mr 9:43,45,47; Lu 12:5; Jas 3:6. In every instance except the last the word comes from the lips of Jesus Christ in most solemn warning of the consequences of sin. He describes it as the place where “their” worm never dies and of fire never to be quenched. The expression is identical in meaning with “lake of fire”. Re 19:20; 20:10,14-15. See “Death, the second” (Joh 8:24; Re 21:8); also on Re 21:8 Cmt. on Lu 16:23.].

Heretics: Rom.16.1-18: “Now I beseech you brethren, mark them which cause divisions and offences contrary to the doctrine which ye have learned; and avoid them. For they that are such serve not our Lord Jesus Christ, but their own belly; and by good words and fair speeches deceive the hearts of the simple.”

High places (sacrificing in): N1 p389 (high places identified with idolatrous practices.  Solomon sacrificed there. 1 Ki. 33-4); N1 p408.

History:

  • “The Historical Books,” p257: “The Historical Books of the Old Testament, usually so called, are twelve in number, from Joshua to Esther inclusive. It should, however, be remembered that the entire Old Testament is filled with historical material. The accuracy of these writings, often questioned, has been in recent years completely confirmed by the testimony of the monuments of contemporaneous antiquity.
    The story of the Historical Books is the story of the rise and fall of the Commonwealth of Israel, while the prophets foretell the future restoration and glory of that under King Messiah.
    The history of Israel falls into seven distinct periods:
    From the call of Abraham to the Exodus, Ge 12.1-Ex 1.22 (with Ac. 7.) The book of Job belongs to this period and shows the maturity and depth of philosophic and religious thought, and the extent of revelation of the age of the Patriarchs.
    II. From the Exodus to the death of Joshua. The history of this period is gathered from the books of Exodus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, and such parts of Leviticus as relate to the story of Israel. The great figures of Moses, Aaron, and Joshua dominate this period.
    III. The period of the Judges, from the death of Joshua to the call of Saul, Jud. 1.1-1Sa 10.24.
    IV. The period of the Kings, from Saul to the Captivities, 1Sa 11.1-2Ki 17.6; 25.30-2Chr 36.23
    V. The period of the Captivities, Esther, and the historical parts of Daniel. With the captivity of Judah began “the times of the Gentiles,” the mark of which is the political subjection of Israel to the Gentile world-powers (Lu 21:24).
    VI. The restored Commonwealth, always under Gentile over-lordship, from the end of the seventy years’ captivity and the return of the Jewish remnant to the destruction of Jerusalem, A.D. 70. The inspired history of this period is found in Ezra, Nehemiah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi in the Old Testament, and in the historical and biographical material found in the New Testament. During this period Christ, the promised King of the Davidic Covenant, and the Seed of the Adamic and Abrahamic Covenants, appeared, was rejected as king, was crucified, rose again from the dead, and ascended to heaven. Toward the end of this period, also, the church came into being, and the New Testament Scriptures, save the Gospel of John, John’s Epistles, and the Revelation, were written.
    VII. The present dispersion (Lu 21:20-24), which according to all the Old Testament prophets is to be ended by the final national regathering promised in the Palestinian Covenant (De 30:1-9). The partial restoration at the end of the 70 years was foretold only by Daniel and Jeremiah, and was to the end that Messiah might come and fulfil the prophecies of His sufferings. In the year A.D. 70 Jerusalem was again destroyed, and the descendants of the remnant of Judah sent to share the national dispersion which still continues.
  • Headnote to Joshua: “Joshua records the consummation of the redemption of Israel of Israel out of Egypt; for redemption has two parts: “out,” and “into” (De 6:23). The key-phrase is “Moses My servant is dead” (Jos 1:2). Law, of which Moses is the representative, could never give a sinful people victory (Heb 7:19; Ro 6:14; 8:2-4).
    In a spiritual sense the book of Joshua is the Ephesians of the Old Testament. “The heavenly” of Ephesians is to the Christian what Canaan was to the Israelite and blessing through divine power (Jos 21:43-45; Eph 1:3)
    The government, as before, was theocratic; Joshua succeeding Moses as the ruler under God.
    Joshua falls into four parts: I. The conquest, 1.-12. II. The partition of the inheritance, 13.-21. III. Incipient discord, 22. IV. Joshua’s last counsels and death, 23., 24. The events recorded in Joshua cover a period of 26 years (Ussher). 1 Joshua Joshua (Je-hoshua, meaning Jehovah-Saviour) is a type of Christ, the “Captain of our salvation” Heb 2:10-11. The more important points are: (1) he comes after Moses Joh 1:17; Ro 8:3; 10:4-5; Heb 7:18-19; Ga 3:23-25. (2) He leads to victory. Ro 8:37; 2Co 1:10; 2:14. (3) He is our Advocate when we have suffered defeat Jos 7:5-9; 1Jo 2:1. (4) He allots our portions Eph 1:11; 4:8-11.

Holiness:

  • N1 to Zech. 8.3, p971. “Zechariah 8:3 Thus saith the LORD; I am returned unto Zion, and will dwell in the midst of Jerusalem: and Jerusalem shall be called a city of truth; and the mountain of the LORD of hosts the holy mountain.” (Holiness, Sanctification, Summary: In the O.T. the words consecration, dedication, sanctification, and holiness are various renderings of one Hebrew word, are used of persons and of things, and have an identical meaning, i.e. set apart for God. Only when used of God himself (e.g. Ý”>Le 11:45), or of the holy angels (e.g. Da 4:13) is any inward Ý”>Le 11:45; Da 4:13 moral quality necessarily Doubtless a priest or other person set apart to the service of God, whose whole will and desire went with his setting apart, experienced progressively an inner detachment from evil; but that aspect is distinctively of the N.T., not of the O.T. Mt 4:5.).
  • N1 to Mt. 4.8, p998. “Then the devil taketh him up into the holy city, and setteth him on a pinnacle of the temple,.” (In the N.T. one Greek word, hagios, in its various forms, is rendered, “holy,” “holiness,” “sanctify,” “sanctified,” “sanctification.” Like the heb. qodesh, it signifies “set apart for God.” The important references follow Mt 4.5, marg. on Mt 4:5).
  • N2 p1353 to Re. 22.11 “He that is unjust, let him be unjust still: and he which is filthy, let him be filthy still: and he that is righteous, let him be righteous still: and he that is holy, let him be holy still.” (Sanctification, holiness, Summary: (1) In both Testaments the same Hebrew and Greek words are rendered by the English words ‘sanctify’ and ‘holy,’ in their various grammatical forms. The one uniform meaning is, ‘to set apart for God.’ (2) In both Testaments the words are used of things and of persons. (3) When used of things no moral quality is implied; they are sanctified or made holy because set apart for God. (4) Sanctification when used of persons has a threefold meaning. (a) In position, believers are eternally set apart for God by redemption, ‘through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once’ (Heb. 10.9, 10). Positionally, therefore, believers are ‘saints’ and ‘holy’ from the moment of believing (Phil. 1.1; Heb. 3.1). (b) In the Scriptures (Hohn 17.17; 2 Cor. 3.18; Eph. 5.25, 26; 1 Thes. 5.23, 24). In consummation, the believer’s complete sanctification awaits the appearing of the Lord (Ehp. 5.27; 1 John 3.2). See ‘Salvation,’ Rom. 1.16, note.)

Homosexuality: The penalty for: Lev. 18.22, 20.13,

House of God, temple: N1 to Haggai 2.3, p963 “Who is left among you that saw this house in her first glory? and how do ye see it now? is it not in your eyes in comparison of it as nothing?” (The prophet calls upon the old men who remembered Solomon’s temple to witness to the new generation how greatly that structure exceeded the present in magnificence; and then utters a prophecy (Hag 1:7-9) which can only refer to the future kingdom temple described by Ezekiel. It is certain that the restoration temple and all subsequent structures, including Herod’s, were far inferior in costliness and splendour to Solomon’s. The present period is described in Ho 3:4-5. Verse 6 is quoted in Heb 12:26-27. Verse 7: “I will shake all nations,” refers to the great tribulation and is followed by the coming of Christ in glory, as in Mt 24:29-30. “The desire of all nations” is Christ. Cmt. on Mal 3:1.)

N1 to Haggai 2.9, p963 “The glory of this latter house shall be greater than of the former, saith the LORD of hosts: and in this place will I give peace, saith the LORD of hosts.” (In a sense all the temples (i.e Solomon’s; Ezra’s; Herod’s; that which will be used by the unbelieving Jews under covenant with the Beast Da 9:27; Mt 24:15; 2Th 2:3-4 and Ezekiel’s future kingdom temple Ez 40.-47.), are treated as one “house”–the “house of the Lord,” since they all profess to be that. For that reason Christ purified the temple of His day, erected though it was by an Idumean usurper to please the Jews. Mt 21:12-13. Margin: glory Or, the future glory of this house shall be greater than the former.).

Husband & wife: 1 Cor. 7.1-16, 27-40.

Hypocrisy: Ro. 2.24 (name of God blasphemed bc of Jews hypocrisy).

Imputation: N1 p1308.

Isaac: Typical is a fourfold way (1) of the church as composed of the spiritual children of Abraham (Gal. 4.28) * * * (3) Of Christ as the Bridegroom of a called-our bride (See Gen 24 & “Church”, Mt. 16.18 & refs.)

Jacob: N1 p69 (His spiritual progress has 6 phases which are given.).

Judging:

  • N1 to Job 42.6 “Wherefore I abhor myself, and repent in dust and ashes.” (The problem, of which the book of Job is the profound discussion, finds here its solution. Brought into the presence of God, Job is revealed to himself. In no sense a hypocrite, but godly and possessing a faith which all his afflictions could not shake, Job was yet self-righteous and lacking in humility. Chapter 29 fully discloses this. But in the presence of God he anticipates, as it were, the experience of Paul. Php 3:4-9 and the problem is solved. The godly are afflicted that they may be brought to self-knowledge and self-judgment. Such afflictions are not penal for their sins, but remedial and purifying. The book of Job affords a sublime illustration of the truth announced in 1Co 11:31-32; Heb 12:7-11. Best of all, such self-knowledge and self-judgment is the prelude to greater fruitfulness. Job 42:7-17; Joh 15:2. Cf. Jos 5:13-14; Eze 1:28; 2:1-3; Da 10:5-11; Re 1:17-19. Margin: repent on Zec 8:14.)
  • 14.46-50 “I am come a light into the world, that whosoever believeth on me should not abide in darkness. And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world. He that rejecteth me, and receiveth not my words, hath one that judgeth him: the word that I have spoken, the same shall judge him in the last day. For I have not spoken of myself; but the Father which sent me, he gave me a commandment, what I should say, and what I should speak. And I know that his commandment is life everlasting: whatsoever I speak therefore, even as the Father said unto me, so I speak.”
  • N1 to I Co. 11.31 p 1222 I Co. 11.31-32“31 For if we would judge ourselves, we should not be judged. 32 But when we are judged, we are chastened of the Lord, that we should not be condemned with the world.” (Self-judgment is not so much the believer’s moral condemnation of his own ways or habits, or of himself, for allowing such ways. Self-judgment avoids chastisement. If neglected, the Lord judges, and the result is chastisement, but never condemnation 1Co 11:32; 2Sa 7:14; 12:13-14; 1Co 5:5; 1Ti 1:20; Heb 12:7.)
  • 1 Cor. 4.4-5; but see 1 Cor. 5.1, 9-13; 6.1-8; 1 Cor. 11.31-2; ***.

Judgment: : “None calleth for justice, nor any pleadeth for truth: they trust in vanity, and speak lies; they conceive mischief, and bring forth iniquity. * * *.” Isa. 59.2-19 at v4.
“And judgment is turned away backward, and justice standeth afar off: for truth is fallen in the street, and equity cannot enter.  Yea, truth faileth: and he that departeth from evil maketh himself a prey: and the LORD saw it, and it displeased him that there was no judgment.” Isa. 59.14-15.
        John 5.19-27: “19 Then answered Jesus and said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, The Son can do nothing of himself, but what he seeth the Father do: for what things soever he doeth, these also doeth the Son likewise. 20 For the Father loveth the Son, and sheweth him all things that himself doeth: and he will shew him greater works than these, that ye may marvel. 21 For as the Father raiseth up the dead, and quickeneth them; even so the Son quickeneth whom he will. 22 For the Father judgeth no man, but hath committed all judgment unto the Son: 23 That all men should honour the Son, even as they honour the Father. He that honoureth not the Son honoureth not the Father which hath sent him. 24 Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life. 25 Verily, verily, I say unto you, The hour is coming, and now is, when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God: and they that hear shall live. 26 For as the Father hath life in himself; so hath he given to the Son to have life in himself; 27 And hath given him authority to execute judgment also, because he is the Son of man.”

Judgment within the family of God: N1 p362 (remedial, not  penal (see 1 Cor. 11.31, note concerning judgment w/in the family of God & Heb. 12.5-11 concerning remedial not penal) whereas the judgment of the wicked is penal, not remedial).

Judgments of God:

  • N2 to Ge. 4.17, p11 Genesis 4:17 “And Cain knew his wife; and she conceived, and bare Enoch: and he builded a city, and called the name of the city, after the name of his son, Enoch.”(The first civilization, that which perished in the judgment of the Flood, was Cainitic in origin, character, and destiny. Every element of material civilization is mentioned in verses Ge 4:16-22, city and pastoral life, and the development of arts and manufactures. Enoch, after whom the first city was named, means “teacher.” The el termination of the names of Enoch’s son and grandson shows that for a time the knowledge of Elohim was preserved, but this soon disappears Ro 1:21-23. Adah means “pleasure,” or “adornment”; Zillah, to “hide”; Lamech, “conqueror,” or “wild man.” (Cf) Ro 1:21-25. on Ge 6:4. The Cainitic civilization may have been as splendid as that of Greece or Rome, but the divine judgment is according to the moral state, not the material. Ge 6:5-7.)
  • N1 to Ge. 6.4, p13 “Genesis 6:4 There were giants in the earth in those days; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bare children to them, the same became mighty men which were of old, men of renown.” ([I totally disagree with the 1st part of this note concerning the “sons of God, and therefore omit it.] … For apostasy there is no remedy but judgment Isa 1:2-7,24-25; Heb 6:4-8; 10:26-31. Noah, “a preacher of righteousness,” is given 120 years, but he won no convert, and the judgment predicted by his great-grandfather fell Jude 1:14-15; Ge 7:11.”)
  • N1 to II Sa. 7.15, p362 “2 Samuel 7:15 But my mercy shall not depart away from him, as I took it from Saul, whom I put away before thee.” (Verses 14 and 15 state the principle of judgment within the family of God. on 1Co 11:31. It is always remedial, not penal Heb 12:5-11. Judgment of the wicked is penal, not remedial.)
  • N1 to Ez. 20.37, p861 “Ezekiel 20:37 And I will cause you to pass under the rod, and I will bring you into the bond of the covenant:” (The passage is a prophecy of the future judgment upon Israel, regathered from all nations (see “Israel,” Isa 1:24-26 refs. into the old wilderness wanderings. Eze 20:35. The issue of this judgment determines who of Israel in that day shall enter the land for kingdom blessing. Ps 50:1-7; Eze 20:33-44; Mal 3:2-5; 4:1-2 see other judgments, Cmt. on Joh 12:31 Cmt. on 1Co 11:31; Cmt. on 2Co 5:10 Cmt. on Mt 25:32; Cmt. on Jude 1:6 Cmt. on Re 20:12)
  • N1 p1036 to Mt. 25.32. “And before him shall be gathered all nations: and he shall separate them one from another, as a shepherd divideth his sheep from the goats:” The Lord here judges the living nations. “This judgment is to be distinguished from the judgment of the great white throne. Here there is no resurrection; the persons judged are living nations; no books are opened; three classes are present, sheep, goats, and brethren; the time is at the return of Christ (Mt 25:31); and the scene is on the earth. All these particulars are in contrast with Re 20:11-15. The test in this judgment is the treatment accorded by the nations to those whom Christ here call “my brethren.” These “brethren” are the Jewish Remnant who will have preached the Gospel of the kingdom to all nations during the tribulation. See “Remnant” Isa 1:9; Ro 11:5. The test in Re 20:11-15 is the possession of eternal life. See, for the other six judgments: Cmt. on Joh 12:31 Cmt. on 1Co 11:31 Cmt. on 2Co 5:10 Cmt. on Eze 20:37 Cmt. on Jude 1:6 Cmt. on Re 20:12.”
  • N1 p1222 to 1 Cor. 11.31 “For if we would judge ourselves, we should not be judged.” “Self-judgment is not so much the believer’s moral condemnation of his own ways or habits, or of himself, for allowing such ways. Self-judgment avoids chastisement. If neglected, the Lord judges, and the result is chastisement, but never condemnation 1Co 11:32; 2Sa 7:14; 12:13-14; 1Co 5:5; 1Ti 1:20; Heb 12:7.”
    N1 p1233; 2 Cor. 5.10 “For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ; that every one may receive the things done in his body, according to that he hath done, whether it be good or bad.” “The judgment of the believer’s works, not sins, is in question here. These have been atoned for, and are “remembered no more forever” Heb 10:17, Mt 12:36; Ro 14:10; Ga 6:7; Eph 6:8; Col 3:24-25. The result is “reward” or “loss” (of the reward), “but he himself shall be saved” 1Co 3:11-15. This judgment occurs at the return of Christ Mt 16:27; Lu 14:14; 1Co 4:5; 2Ti 4:8; Re 22:12. See other judgments: Cmt. on Joh 12:31 Cmt. on 1Co 11:31 Cmt. on Mt 25:32 Cmt. on Eze 20:37 Cmt. on Jude 1:6 Cmt. on Re 20:12.”
  • 9.27 (. . . once to die . . . judgment.)
  • N2 p1328 (judgment of fallen angels).
  • The great white throne judgment: N3,4 to Rev. 20.11 p1350 “And I saw a great white throne, and him that sat on it, from whose face the earth and the heaven fled away; and there was found no place for them.” “3 great white throne The expressions, “the judgment,” or, “day of judgment,” as the passages and their context show, refer to the final judgment of Re 20:11-15. “4 The “day of destruction” is that aspect of the day of Jehovah Isa 2:12. on Re 19:19 (Summary) which visits final and eternal judgment upon the wicked. Three such “days” are included in the “day” of Jehovah, and are described in the references beginning with Isa 34:1-9. Cmt. on Mt 25:32. Margin: And I saw Cmt. on Re 20:12.”
  • The final judgment: N1 p1351 to Rev. 20.12. (“And I saw the dead, small and great, stand before God; and the books were opened: and another book was opened, which is the book of life: and the dead were judged out of those things which were written in the books, according to their works.” “The final judgment. The subjects are the “dead.” As the redeemed were raised from among the dead one thousand years before Re 20:5 and have been in glory with Christ during that period, the “dead” can only be the wicked dead, from the beginning to the setting up of the great white throne in space. As there are degrees of punishment Lu 12:27,48 the dead are judged according to their works. The book of life is there to answer such as plead their works for justification, e.g. Mt 7:22-23 an awful blank where the name might have been.
  • “The Judgments, Summary: Among the many judgments mentioned in Scripture, seven are invested with especial significance. These are: (1) The judgment of the Believer’s sins in the cross of Christ on Joh 12:31; (2) the believer’s self-judgment Cmt. on 1Co 11:31.; (3) the judgment of the believers’ works Cmt. on 2Co 5:10; (4) the judgment of the nations at the return of Christ Cmt. on Mt 25:32; (5) the judgment of Israel at the return of Christ Cmt. on Eze 20:37; (6) the judgment of angels after the one thousand years Cmt. on Jude 1:6, and (7) the judgment of the wicked dead with which the history of the present earth ends.”)

Judgment (self-judgment): N1 p1222 to 1 Cor. 11.31.

Justification (See also, “Grace” and “Law”):

  • N2 to Le. 1:4. “And he shall put his hand upon the head of the burnt offering; and it shall be accepted for him to make atonement for him.” “The laying of the offerer’s hand signified acceptance and identification if himself with his offering. In type it answered to the believer’s faith accepting and identifying himself with Christ Ro 4:5; 6:3-11. The believer is justified by faith, and his faith is reckoned for righteousness, because his faith identifies him with Christ, who died as his sin-offering 2Co 5:21; 1Pe 2:24. Margin: atonement on Ex 29:33.”
  • 2.4: “[T]he just shall live by faith.” Ro. 3.21-5.11.
  • 5 “17 For if by one man’s offence death reigned by one; much more they which receive abundance of grace and of the gift of righteousness shall reign in life by one, Jesus Christ) 18 Therefore as by the offence of one judgment came upon all men to condemnation; even so by the righteousness of one the free gift came upon all men unto justification of life. 19 For as by one man’s disobedience many were made sinners, so by the obedience of one shall many be made righteouw. 20 Moreover the law entered, that the offence might abound. But where sin abounded, grace did much more abound: 21 That as sin hath reigned unto death, even so might grace reign through righteousness unto eternal life by Jesus Christ our Lord.”
  • Peter’s sermon to Gentiles in the house of Cornelius; Theme: Salvation through faith. Acts 10.34-43.
  • Paul’s sermon in the synagogue at Antioch in Pisidia. Theme: Justification by faith. Acts 13.14-43.
  • Acts 13 “38 Be it known unto you therefore, men and brethren, that through this man is preached unto you the forgiveness of sins: 39 And by him all that believe are justified from all things, from which ye could not be justified by the law of Moses.”
  • Acts 13.46-49: Paul turns from the Jews to the Gentiles. See also, Acts 18.6-7.
  • In Acts 15.1- certain men taught you had to be circumcised to be saved. Paul and Barnabas go to Jerusalem to address whether one has to be circumcised and to keep the law of Moses to be saved (which was taught by certain Pharisees which believed).  Notice Paul’s argument in vs. 7-11, etc.)  See N1 p1170.  Notice also James’ declarations and the contents of the resultant letters to the Gentiles in vs. 23-29: that they should “abstain from meats offered to idols, and from blood, and from things strangled, and from fornication: from which if ye keep yourselves, ye shall do well.”
  • N4 p1195 to Ro. 3.28 “Romans 3:28 Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith without the deeds of the law.” (Justification, Summary: Justification and righteousness are inseparably united in Scripture by the fact that the same word (dikaios, “righteous”; dikaioo, “to justify”) is used for both. The believing sinner is justified because Christ, having borne his sins on the cross, has been “made unto him righteousness” 1Co 1:30. Justification originates in grace Ro 3:24; Tit 3:4-5 is through the redemptive and propitiatory work of Christ, who has vindicated the law Ro 3:24; 5:9 is by faith, not works Ro 3:28-30; 4:5; 5:1; Ga 2:16; 3:8,24 and may be defined as the judicial act of God whereby He justly declares righteous one who believes on Jesus Christ. It is the Judge Himself Ro 8:31-34 who thus declares. The justified believer has been in court, only to learn that nothing is laid to his charge. Ro 8:1,33-34.)
  • Justification defined in Ro. 3.21-28.
  • Justification a universal remedy: Ro. 3.29-30.
  • Justification by faith honours the law: Ro. 3.31.
  • Justification by faith illustrated: Ro. 4.1-4.
  • Justifying faith defines (See also vs. 18-21): Ro. 4.5-8.
  • Justification is apart from ordinances: Ro. 4.9-12.
  • Justification is apart from the law: Ro. 4.13-25.
  • The sever results of justification: 5.1-11.
  • N1 p1196 to Ro. 4.2 (“For what saith the scripture? Abraham believed God, and it was counted unto him for righteousness.”). (the justification spoken of by Paul vs. the justification spoken of by James.) “Cf. Jas. 2.24. These are two aspects of one truth. Paul speaks of that which justifies man before God, viz.: faith alone, wholly apart from works; James of the proof before men, that he professes to have justifying faith really has it.  Paul speaks of what God sees—faith; James of what men see—works, as the visible evidence of faith.  Paul draws his illustration from Gen. 15.6; James from Gen 22.1-19.  James’ key-phrase is ‘ye see’ (Jas. 2.24), for men cannot see faith except as manifested through works.”
  • Introductory notes to Galatians: “Theme is the vindication of the Gospel of the grace of God from any admixture of law-conditions, which qualify or destroy its character of pure grace. The Galatian error had two forms, both of which are refuted. The first is the teaching that obedience to the law is mingled with faith as ground of the sinner’s justification; the second, that the justified believer is made perfect by keeping the law.  Paul meets the 1st form of the error by a demonstration that justification is through the Abrahamic Covenant (Gen. 15.18), and that the law, which was 430 yrs. after the confirmation of that covenant, and the true purpose of which was condemnation, not justification, cannot disannul a salvation which rests upon the earlier covenant.  Paul meets the 2nd and more subtle form by vindicating the office of the Holy Spirit as Sanctifier.”
  • N1 p1241 to Gal. 1.6 (The test of the Gospel is grace. If the message excludes grace, or mingles law with grace as the means either of justification or sanctification (Gal. 2.21; 3.1-3), or denies the fact or guilt of sin which alone gives grace its occasion and opportunity, it is “another” gospel, and the preacher of it is under the anathema of God (vs 8, 9)).
  • 2.15-18.
  • 2. 21 “I don not frustrate the grace of God: for if righteousness come by the law, Christ is dead in vain.”
  • 3.11 “But that no man is justified by the law in the sight of God, it is evident: for, The just shall live by faith.”
  • 3.21 “Is the law then against the promises of God? God forbid: for if there had been a law given which could have given life, verily righteousness should have been by the law. * * * Wherefore the law was our schoolmaster to bring us unto Christ, that we might be justified by faith. 25 But after that faith is come, we are no longer under a schoolmaster.” See Notes 1 and 2 p 1244 as to the law.
  • 5.19-31 The two systems, law and grace, cannot co-exist (the son of he bondwoman and the son of the freewoman, Sarah, are an allegory, etc. Application of the allegory in Gal. 5.)
  • 5.4 “Christ is become of no effect unto you, whosoever of you are justified by law; ye are fallen from grace.”
  • James: Justification before man is by works, etc. See Luke 7, 36-50 and N1 to Luke 7.44 for an example of what James is talking about.  See also, Acts 15 to clear up what James believed.

King: Deut. 17.14-20: [God’s guidelines for a king.]

Knowing God:

  • John 15.15: “Henceforth I call you not servants; for the servant knoweth not what his lord doeth: but I have called you friends; for all things that I have heard of my Father I have made known unto you.”
  • John 17:25-26: “O righteous Father, the world hath not known thee: but I have known thee, and these have known that thou hast sent me. And I have declared unto them thy name, and will declare it: that the love wherewith thou hast loved me may be in them, and I in them.”
  • Romans 1.19-21: “Because that which may be known of God is manifest in them; for God hath shewed it unto them. For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse: Because that, when they knew God, they glorified him not as God, neither were thankful; but became vain in their imaginations, and their foolish heart was darkened.”
  • Philippians 3.7-14 “But what things were gain to me, those I counted loss for Christ. Yea doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ, And be found in him, not having mine own righteousness, which is of the law, but that which is through the faith of Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith: That I may know him, and the power of his resurrection, and the fellowship of his sufferings, being made conformable unto his death; If by any means I might attain unto the resurrection of the dead. Not as though I had already attained, either were already perfect: but I follow after, if that I may apprehend that for which also I am apprehended of Christ Jesus. Brethren, I count not myself to have apprehended: but this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.”
  • 1.17-23 “17 That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and revelation in the knowledge of him: 18 The eyes of your understanding being enlightened; that ye may know what is the hope of his calling, and what the riches of the glory of his inheritance in the saints, 19 And what is the exceeding greatness of his power to us-ward who believe, according to the working of his mighty power, 20 Which he wrought in Christ, when he raised him from the dead, and set him at his own right hand in the heavenly places, 21 Far above all principality, and power, and might, and dominion, and every name that is named, not only in this world, but also in that which is to come: 22 And hath put all things under his feet, and gave him to be the head over all things to the church, 23 Which is his body, the fulness of him that filleth all in all.” [Bold emphasis mine.]
  • Philippians 3.7-14: “But what things were gain to me, those I counted loss for Christ. Yea doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ, And be found in him, not having mine own righteousness, which is of the law, but that which is through the faith of Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith:That I may know him, and the power of his resurrection, and the fellowship of his sufferings, being made conformable unto his death; If by any means I might attain unto the resurrection of the dead. Not as though I had already attained, either were already perfect: but I follow after, if that I may apprehend that for which also I am apprehended of Christ Jesus. Brethren, I count not myself to have apprehended: but this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.”

Korah: N2 p188 to Num. 16.1 (The “gainsaying of Korah” was intrusion into the priest’s office (“no man taketh this honour unto himself,” (Heb. 5.4).  It was an attempt to create a priestly order without the divine authority (5.10). The modern analogue is Nicolaitanism (Rev. 2.6, 15), the division  of an equal brotherhood (Mt. 23.8) into “clergy” and “laity”; a vastly different thing from the due recognition of ministry-gifts (1 Cor. 12.4-31; Eph. 4., 8, 11, 12), or of elders and deacons (1 Tim. 3.1-13; Tit. 1.5-9).

Last days: N1 p1151.

Laws given by God: Lev. 18-20, 24.10-23.

Lawyer: N1 p1031 to Mt. 22.35 (Gr. nomikos, “of the law”; occurs also, Lk. 7.30; 10.25; 11.45, 46, 52; 14.3; Tit. 3.13. Except in the last instance, “lawyer” is another name for “scribe” (Mt. 2.4, note). In Tit. 3.13 the term has the modern meaning.

Leaven:

  • N1, 2 p128 to Leviticus 2.11. “No meat offering, which ye shall bring unto the LORD, shall be made with leaven: for ye shall burn no leaven, nor any honey, in any offering of the LORD made by fire.” (1 For meanings of leaven see Mat 13:.33. Also Le 7:13, on Le 7:13. 2 Honey is mere natural sweetness and could not symbolize the divine graciousness of the Lord Jesus.)
  • N2 p134 to Leviticus 7.13. “Leviticus 7:13 Besides the cakes, he shall offer for his offering leavened bread with the sacrifice of thanksgiving of his peace offerings.” (The use of leaven here is significant. Peace with God is something which the believer shares with God. Christ is our peace-offering Eph 2:13. Any thanksgiving for peace must, first of all, present Him. In verse 12 we have this, in type, and so leaven is excluded. In verse 13 it is the offerer who gives thanks for his participation in the peace, and so leaven fitly signifies, that though having peace with God through the work of another, there is still evil in him. This is illustrated in Am 4:5 where the evil in Israel is before God.)
  • Ns 3&4 p 1016 (excellent exposition of “leaven”)
  • 13.33, notes 3 & 4. Parable of the Leaven. “That interpretation of the parable of the Leaven (Mt 13:33) which makes (with variation as to details) the leaven to be the Gospel, introduced into the world (“three measures of meal”) by the church, and working subtly until the world is converted (“till the whole was leavened”) is open to fatal objection: (1) it does violence to the unvarying symbolical meaning of leaven, and especially to the meaning fixed by our Lord Himself. Mt 16:6-12; Mr 8:15 See “Leaven,” Ge 19:3. Cmt. on Mt 13:33. (2) The implication of a converted world in this age (“till the whole was leavened”), is explicitly contradicted by our Lord’s interpretation of the parables of the Wheat and Tares, and of the Net. Our Lord presents a picture of a partly converted kingdom in an unconverted world; of good fish and bad in the very kingdom-net itself. (3) The method of the extension of the kingdom is given in the first parable. It is by sowing seed, not by mingling leaven. The symbols have, in Scripture, a meaning fixed by inspired usage. Leaven is the principle of corruption working subtly; is invariably used in a bad sense (see “Leaven,” Cmt. on Ge 19:3), and is defined by our Lord as evil doctrine. Mt 16:11-12; Mr 8:15. Meal, on the contrary, was used in one of the sweet-savour offerings Le 2:1-3. and was food for the priests Le 6:15-17. A woman, in the bad ethical sense, always symbolizes something out of place, religiously, Cmt. on Zec 5:6. In Thyatira it was a woman teaching (cf). Re 2:20; 17:1-6. Interpreting the parable by these familiar symbols, it constitutes a warning that the true doctrine, given for nourishment of the children of the kingdom Mt 4:4; 1Ti 4:6; 1Pe 2:2 would be mingled with corrupt and corrupting false doctrine, and that officially, by the apostate church itself 1Ti 4:1-3; 2Ti 2:17; 4:3-4; 2Pe 2:1-3.
  • 4 Leaven Summary: (1) Leaven, as a symbolic or typical substance, is always mentioned in the O.T. in an evil sense ( 19.3, refs.). (2) The use of the word in the N.T. explains its symbolic meaning. It is ‘malice and wickedness,’ as contrasted with ‘sincerity and truth’ (1 Cor. 5.6-8). It is evil doctrine (Mt. 16.12) in its three-fold form of Pharisasism, Sadduceeism, Herodianism (Mt. 16.6; Mk. 8.15). The leaven of the Pharisees was externalism in religion. (Mt. 23.14, 16, 23-28); of the Sadducees, scepticism as to the supernatural and as to the Scriptures (Mt. 22.23, 29); of the Herodians, worldliness—a Herod party amongst the Jews (Mt. 22.16-21; Mk. 3:6). (3) The use of the word in Mt. 13:33 is congruous with its universal meaning.”
  • 16.6-12 “6 Then Jesus said unto them, Take heed and beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees. 2 And they reasoned among themselves, saying, It is because we have taken no bread. 8 Which when Jesus perceived, he said unto them, O ye of little faith, why reason ye among yourselves, because ye have brought no bread? 9 Do ye not yet understand, neither remember the five loaves of the five thousand, and how many baskets ye took up? 10 Neither the seven loaves of the four thousand, and how many baskets ye took up? 11 How is it that ye do not understand that I spake it not to you concerning bread, that ye should beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees? 12 Then understood they how that he bade them not beware of the leaven of bread, but of the doctrine of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees.”
  • 8.10-21.
  • 12.1-3.
  • 13.20-21.
  • 5 (entire chapter) “6 Your glorying is not good. Know ye not that a little leaven leaveneth the whole lump? 7 Purge out therefore the old leaven, that ye may be a new lump, as ye are unleavened. For even Christ our Passover is sacrificed for us. * * *.”
  • 6.9-7.40. The sanctity of the body, and marriage.

Life, eternal: N4 p1353 to Rev. 22.19 “And if any man shall take away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take away his part out of the book of life, and out of the holy city, and from the things which are written in this book.” (Eternal life, Summary of the teaching: (1) The life is called “eternal” because it was from the eternity which is past unto the eternity which is to come–it is the life of God revealed in Jesus Christ, who is God “>Joh 1:4; 5:26; 1Jo 1:1-2. (2) This life of God, which was revealed in Christ, is imparted in a new birth by the Holy Spirit, acting upon the word of God, to every believer on the Lord Jesus Christ Joh 3:3-15. (3) The life thus imparted was from the beginning.” But the recipient is a “new creation” 2Co 5:17; Ga 6:15. (4) The life of God which is the believer is an unsevered part of the life which eternally was, and eternally is, in Christ Jesus–one life, in Him and in the believer–Vine and branches; Head and members 1Co 6:17; Ga 2:20; Col 1:27; 3:3-4; 1Jo 5:11-12; Joh 15:1-5; 1Co 12:12-14)

Life, liberty

  • 1 Co. 7.20-24 “20 Let every man abide in the same calling wherein he was called. 21 Art thou called being a servant? care not for it: but if thou mayest be made free, use it 22 For he that is called in the Lord, being a servant, is the Lord’s freeman: likewise also he that is called, being free, is Christ’s servant. 23 Ye are bought with a price; be not ye the servants of men. 24 Brethren, let every man, wherein he is called, therein abide with God.”
  • 1 Co. 8.9 ‘1 Corinthians 8:9 But take heed lest by any means this liberty of yours become a stumblingblock to them that are weak.’
  • 1 Co. 9:1 “Am I not an apostle? am I not free? have I not seen Jesus Christ our Lord? are not ye my work in the Lord?”
  • 5.1 “Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage.”
  • 5.13-14 “For, brethren, ye have been called unto liberty; only use not liberty for an occasion to the flesh, but by love serve one another. For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.”
  • The inward power of the Spirit has made you free — really, actually free — from the law or power “of sin and death” (Rom 8:2). This is liberty, true Gospel liberty, experienced by every true believer. This is not freedom from the law of God, or the works of God, but from the law of sin and the works of the devil. See that you stand fast in this real, not imaginary, liberty. Take heed that you “be not entangled again” by means of these vain boasters, “in the yoke of” that vile “bondage to sin,” from which you have cleanly escaped (Gal 5:1).

Love:

  • “Wonderful Love,” Dave Hunt, December 2005 of Berean Call.
  • N1 p1326 to 2 John 5 “And now I beseech thee, lady, not as though I wrote a new commandment unto thee, but that which we had from the beginning, that we love one another.” (“The new ‘law of Christ’ is the divine love, as wrought into the renewed heart by the Holy Spirit (Rom. 5.5; Heb. 10.16), and outflowing in the energy of the Spirit, unforced and spontaneous, toward the objects of the divine love (2 Cor. 5.14-20; 1 Thes. 2, 7, 8). It is, therefore, ‘the law of liberty’ (Jas. 1.25; 2.12), in contrast with the external law of Moses.  Moses’ law demands love (Lev. 19.18; Deut. 6.5; Lk. 10.27); Christ’s law is love (Rom. 5.5; 1 John 4.7, 19, 20), and so takes the place of the external law by fulfilling it (Rom. 13.10; Gal. 5.14). It is the ‘law written in the heart’ under the New Covenant (Heb. 8.8, note)”).

Love. See 2 John.

  • Faith causes love, love causes action. See Eph. 3.17-21; Gal. 5.6.
  • N1 p1254: Christ’s threefold love-work for the church . . . .
  • N1, p1326: The new “law of Christ” is the divine love, as wrought into the renewed heart by the Holy Spirit (Rom. 5.5; Heb. 10.16), and out flowing in the energy of the Spirit, unforced and spontaneous, toward the objects of the divine Love (2 Cor. 5.14-20; 1 Thes. 2.7, 8). It is, therefore, the law of liberty (Jas. 1.25; 2.12), in contrast w/the external law of Moses.  Moses’ law demands love (Lev. 19.18; Deut. 6.5; Lk. 10.27); Christ’s law is love (Rom. 5.5; 1 John 4.7, 19, 20), and so takes the place of the external law by fulfilling it (Rom. 13.10; Gal. 5.14).  It is the “law written in the heart” under the New Covenant (Heb. 8.8, note).

Manna: N1 p91, N2 p263.

Marriage

  • Deut. 24.1-6 (The Mosaic Law of divorce).
  • McGee, Isaiah, VI, p. 45. The three cords that hold marriage together.
  • Mal. 2.14 (JFB: “14. Wherefore?–Why does God reject our offerings?
  • Lord . . . witness between thee and . . . wife–(so Ge 31:49-50). of thy youth–The Jews still marry very young, the husband often being but thirteen years of age, the wife younger (Pr 5:18; Isa 54:6). “wife of thy covenant–not merely joined to thee by the marriage covenant generally, but by the covenant between God and Israel, the covenant-people, whereby a sin against a wife, a daughter of Israel, is a sin against God [MOORE]. Marriage also is called “the covenant of God” (Pr 2:17), and to it the reference may be (Ge 2:24; Mt 19:6; 1Co 7:10).”)
  • Mal. 2.14 (Barnes: And ye say, Wherefore? – They again act the innocent, or half-ignorant. What had they to do with their wives’ womanly tears? He who knows the hearts of all was Himself the witness between them and the wife of youth of each; her to whom, in the first freshness of life and their young hearts, each had plighted his troth having been entrusted by her with her earthy all. Ge 31:49-50. “The Lord,” said even Laban, when parting from his daughters, “watch between me and thee, when we are absent, the one from the other; if thou shalt afflict my daughters, or if thou shalt take wives beside my daughters, no man is with us; see, God is witness between me and thee.”
    “And he dealt treacherously against her -, violating his own faith and her trusting love, which she had given once for all, and could not now retract. “And she is thy companion;” she has been another self, the companion of thy life, sharing thy sorrows, joys, hopes, fears, interests; different in strength, yet in all, good and ill, sickness and health, thy associate and companion; the help meet for the husband and provided for him by God in Paradise; and above all, “the wife of thy covenant,” to whom thou didst pledge thyself before God. These are so many aggravations of their sin. She was the wife of their youth, of their covenant, their companion; and God was the Witness and Sanctifier of their union. Marriage was instituted and consecrated by God in Paradise. Man was to leave father and mother (if so be), but to cleave to his wife indissolubly. For they were to be Mt 19:6, “no more twain, but one flesh.” Hence, as a remnant of Paradise, even the pagan knew of marriage, as a religious act, guarded by religious sanctions. Among God’s people, marriage was a Pr 2:17 “covenant of their God.” To that original institution of marriage he seems to refer in the following:”)
  • Mal. 2.14 (Clark: “Ye say, Wherefore? – Is the Lord angry with us? Because ye have been witness of the contract made between the parties; and when the lawless husband divorced his wife, the wife of his youth, his companion, and the unite of his covenant, ye did not execute on him the discipline of the law. They kept their wives till they had passed their youth, and then put them away, that they might get young ones in their place.”)
  • Mal. 2.14 (Poole: “…Yet is she thy companion; yet she is, what she was by the sacred institution of God made, thy companion, not thy drudge, or slave; thou art most unjust to her, thus to change thy affection and deportment when there is no change in her state and relation.And the wife of thy covenant: covenants ought to be very exactly kept, and those especially which are of our own freest and most voluntary making, our covenants; such was this between the unnatural husband and his despised wife: all which, as they should have been arguments to his duty, so they are aggravations of his neglect of duty, and provocations to God. And now judge, ye disputing, quarrelling hypocrites, whether God hath not justest cause to reject your offerings.”)
  • Mal. 2.15 “And did not he make one? Yet had he the residue of the spirit. And wherefore one? That he might seek a godly seed. Therefore take heed to your spirit, and let none deal treacherously against the wife of his youth.” (Barnes: “And did not He -, God, of whom he had spoken as the witness between man and his wife, “make one,” namely, Adam first, to mark the oneness of marriage and make it a law of nature, appointing “that out of man (created in His own image and similitude), woman should take her beginning, and, knitting them together, did teach that it should never be lawful to put asunder those, whom He by matrimony had made one?” “Between those two, and consequently between all other married, to be born from them, He willed that there should be one indivisible union, for Adam could be married to no other save Eve, since no other had been created by God, nor could Eve turn to any other man than Adam, since there was no other in the world. ‘Infringe not then this sanction of God, and unity of marriage, and degenerate not from your first parents, Adam and Eve.'” “If divorce had been good, Jesus says, God would not have made one man and one woman, but, having made one Adam, would have made two women, had He meant that he should cast out the one, bring in the other; but now by the mode of creation, He brought in this law, that each should have, throughout, the wife which he had from the beginning. This law is older than that about divorce, as much as Adam is older than Moses.”
    “Yet had he the residue of the spirit – Ge 2:7, “the breath of life, which He breathed into Adam, and man became a living soul.” All the souls, which God would ever create, are His, and He could have called them into being at once. Yet in order to designate the unity of marriage, He willed to create but one. So our Lord argues against divorce Mt 19:4-6, “Have ye not read, that He which made them at the beginning, made them male and female?” They both together are called “one man” Ge 1:27, and, therefore, should be of one mind and spirit also, the unity of which they ought faithfully to preserve.
    “And wherefore one? – “Seeking a seed of God,” i. e., worthy of God, for from religious marriage, religious offspring may most be hoped from God; and by violating that law, those before the flood brought in a spurious, unsanctified generation, so that God in His displeasure destroyed them all. “And take heed to your spirit,” which ye too had from God, which was His, and which He willed in time to create. He closes, as he began, with an appeal to man’s natural feeling, “let none deal treacherously against the wife of his youth.”)
  • (Clark on Mal. 2.15: “And did not he make one? – One of each kind, Adam and Eve. Yet had he the residue of the Spirit, he could have made millions of pairs, and inspired them all with living souls. Then wherefore one? He made one pair from whom all the rest might proceed, that he might have a holy offspring; that children being a marked property of one man and one woman, proper care might be taken that they should be brought up in the discipline of the Lord. Perhaps the holy or godly seed, זרע אלהים zera Elohim, a seed of God, may refer to the Messiah. God would have the whole human race to spring from one pair, that Christ, springing from the same family, might in his sufferings taste death for every man; because he had that nature that was common to the whole human race. Had there been several heads of families in the beginning, Jesus must have been incarnated from each of those heads, else his death could have availed for those only who belonged to the family of which he was incarnated.  “Take heed to your spirit – Scrutinize the motives which induce you to put away your wives.”)
  • (FBN on Mal. 2.15: “Make one; that is, “one flesh,” by the union of one man with one woman. The prophet refers to the original institution of marriage, which alike excluded polygamy and divorce. Ge 2:23-24. The residue of the spirit; the creative power remained with him, and he could have made more women had he seen good. A godly seed; the design of the marriage institution, as originally established, is here given.”)
  • (JFB on Mal. 2.15: “15. MAURER and HENGSTENBERG explain the verse thus: The Jews had defended their conduct by the precedent of Abraham, who had taken Hagar to the injury of Sarah, his lawful wife; to this Malachi says now, “No one (ever) did so in whom there was a residue of intelligence (discriminating between good and evil); and what did the one (Abraham, to whom you appeal for support) do, seeking a godly seed?” His object (namely, not to gratify passion, but to obtain the seed promised by God) makes the case wholly inapplicable to defend your position. MOORE (from FAIRBAIRN) better explains, in accordance with Mal 2:10, “Did not He make (us Israelites) one? Yet He had the residue of the Spirit (that is, His isolating us from other nations was not because there was no residue of the Spirit left for the rest of the world). And wherefore (that is, why then did He thus isolate us as) the one (people; the Hebrew is ‘the one’)? In order that He might seek a godly seed”; that is, that He might have “a seed of God,” a nation the repository of the covenant, and the stock of the Messiah, and the witness for the one God amidst the surrounding polytheisms. Marriage with foreign women, and repudiation of the wives wedded in the Jewish covenant, utterly set aside this divine purpose. CALVIN thinks “the one” to refer to the conjugal one body formed by the original pair (Ge 2:24). God might have joined many wives as one with the one husband, for He had no lack of spiritual being to impart to others besides Eve; the design of the restriction was to secure a pious offspring: but compare Note, see on Cmt. on Mal 2:10. One object of the marriage relation is to raise a seed for God and for eternity.”)
  • (Poole on Mal. 2.15: “Ver. 15. And did he, God our Creator, not make one, but one man and one woman? Yet had he the residue of the spirit; yet he could have made more men and women; and if it had been good, and well-pleasing to him, he could have made many women for one man; but though by his power he could, yet in his wisdom, goodness, and holiness he would not make more; from the beginning marriage was ordained to be between one man and one woman alone at once. So Christ argued Mt 19:4-6. And wherefore one, one couple, and no more? That he might seek a godly seed; or, a seed of God; either an excellent seed, as the Hebrew expresses the excellency of a thing by the addition of the name God to it; or rather a holy seed, born to God in chaste wedlock, and brought up under the instructions and virtuous examples of parents living in the fear of God, and love of each other, which in polygamy cannot be expected. Take heed to your spirit; keep your heart from wandering after strange wives, as you tender your life and souls. Let none deal treacherously against the wife of his youth; though many have done so, let none now do it any more. ”)
  • (Wesley on Mal. 2.15: “One – But one man, and one woman. Yet – Yet he could have made more. Wherefore one – One couple, and no more. A godly seed – A holy seed born to God in chaste wedlock, and bred as they were born, in the fear of God. Take heed – Keep your heart from wandering after strange wives.”)

Mary: N1 p994 (the 6 Marys in scripture).

Melchisedek: ; Ge. 14.17-24; N1 to Ge. 14.18 p23. N1 to Mt. 3.15, p997.

Messianic Psalms: See N1 p658 for summary.

Miracles of Christ: Eusebius’ Ecclesiastical History, Book 1 Chap 13, Book 4 Chap 3.

Mountain: N2 to Is. 2.2, p714 “Isaiah 2:2  And it shall come to pass in the last days, that the mountain of the LORD’S house shall be established in the top of the mountains, and shall be exalted above the hills; and all nations shall flow unto it.” (A mountain, in Scripture symbolism, means a kingdom Da 2:35; Re 13:1; 17:9-11.)

Multiculturism:  Be ye therefore very courageous to keep and do all that is written in the book of the law of Moses, that ye turn not aside therefrom to the right hand or to the left; That ye come not among these nations, these that remain among you; neither make mention of the name of their gods, nor cause to swear by them, neither serve them, nor bow yourselves unto them; but cleave unto the LORD your God . . . .  [Don’t intermarry w/them.] [Consequences given]. ”  Josh. 23.6-16.

Moses: N1 p72 (Type of Christ the Deliverer).

Mysteries: THE PROPHETICAL BOOKS, P711: “But as the King is also Son of Abraham (Mt 1:1), the promised Redeemer, and as redemption is only through the sacrifice of Christ, so messianic prophecy of necessity presents Christ in a twofold character–a suffering Messiah (e.g. Isa. 53.), and a reigning Messiah (e.g. Isa. 11.). This duality, suffering and glory, weakness and power, involved a mystery which perplexed the prophets (1Pe 1:10-12; Lu 24.26.27).
“The solution of that mystery lies, as the New Testament makes clear, in the two advents–the first advent to redemption through suffering; the second advent to the kingdom glory, when the national promises to Israel will be fulfilled (Mt 1:21-23; Lu 2:28-35; 24:46-48, with Lu 1:31-33, 68-75; Mt 2:2,6; 19:27,28 Ac 2:30-32; 15:14-16). The prophets indeed describe the advent in two forms which could not be contemporaneous (e.g. Zec 9:9; contra, 14.1-9), but to them it was not revealed that between the advent to suffering, and the advent to glory, would be accomplished certain “mysteries of the kingdom” (Mt 13:11-16), not that, consequent upon Messiah’s rejection, the new Testament Church would be called out. These were, to them, “mysteries hid in God” (Eph 3:1-10).”
               N2 p1014 to Mt. 13.11 (The greater “mysteries” in Scripture.  A “mystery” in Scripture is a greater hidden truth, now divinely revealed, but in which a supernatural element still remains despite the revelation.  The greater mysteries are: (1) The mysteries of the kingdom of heaven (Mt. 13.3-50); (2) the mystery of Israel’s blindness during this age (Rom. 11.25, with context); (3) the mystery of the translation of living saints at the end of this age (1 Cor. 15.51, 52; 1 Thes. 4.14-17); (4) the mystery of the NT church as one body composed of Jew and Gentile (Eph. 3.1-11; Rom. 16.25; Eph. 6.19; Col. 4.3); (5) the mystery of the church as the bride of Christ (Eph. 5.28-32); (6) the mystery of the inliving Christ (Gal. 2.20; Col. 1.26, 27); (7) the “mystery of God even Christ,” i.e., Christ as the incarnate fullness of the Godhead embodied, in whom all the divine wisdom for man subsists (Col. 2.2, 9; 1 Cor. 2.7); (8) the mystery of the processes by which godlikeness is restored to man (1 Tim. 3.16); (9) the mystery of iniquity (2 Thes. 2.7; Mt. 13.33); (10) the mystery of the seven stars (Rev. 1.20); (11) the mystery of Babylon (Rev. 17.5, 7).
Ep. 3.1-12 The church a mystery hidden from past ages. “… Which in other ages was not made known unto the sons of men, as it is now revealed unto his holy apostles and prophets by the Spirit; …” [Bold emphasis mine.] Ro. 16.25 “Now to him that is of power to stablish you according to my gospel, and the preaching of Jesus Christ, according to the revelation of the mystery, which was kept secret since the world began,”
N1 p1252 to Ep. 3.6 “That the Gentiles should be fellowheirs, and of the same body, and partakers of his promise in Christ by the gospel:” (That the Gentiles were to be saved was no mystery Ro 9:24-33; 10:19-21. The mystery “hid in God” was the divine purpose to make of Jew and Gentile a wholly new thing–“the church, which is his Christ’s body,” formed by the baptism with the Holy Spirit 1Co 12:12-13 and in which the earthly distinction of Jew and Gentile disappears Eph 2:14-15; Col 3:10-11. The revelation of this mystery, which was foretold, but not explained by Christ Mt 16:18 was committed to Paul. In his writings alone we find the doctrine, position, walk, and destiny of the church.)

Names of deity: See N1,2 p 24 (gives the other notes describing the names of deity).

Nations, God’s judgment of: Predicted  judgment on Assyria, God’s rod on Samaria. Isa. 10.5-19 & N1 p722 (The Gentile nations are permitted to afflict Israel in chastisement for her national sins, but invariably and inevitably retribution falls upon them (verses cited)). N2 p722 to Isa. 10.20 (final destruction of all Gentile world-power at the return of the Lord in glory (verses cited)). The approach of the Gentile hosts to the battle of Armageddon. Isa. 10.28-34, Rev. 16.14; 19.11.

Nature of man: N1 p1200 to Ro. 7.14: “Cf. 1Co 3:1,4. “Carnal” = “fleshly” is Paul’s word for the Adamic nature, and for the believer who “walks,” i.e. lives, under the power of it. “Natural” is his characteristic word for the unrenewed man 1Co 2:14 as “spiritual” designates the renewed man who walks in the Spirit 1Co 3:1; Ga 6:1.”
N2 p1200 to Ro. 12.15: “The apostle personifies the strife of the two natures in the believer, the old or Adamic nature, and the divine nature received through the new birth 1Pe 1:23; 2Pe 1:4; Ga 2:20; Col 1:27. The “I” which is Saul of Tarsus, and the “I” which is Paul the apostle are at strife, and “Paul” is in defeat. In Chapter 8, this strife is effectually taken up on the believer’s behalf by the Holy Spirit Ro 8:2; Ga 5:16-17 and Paul is victorious. Contra, Eph 6:12 where the conflict is not fleshly, but spiritual.”

New heaven  & new earth. Isa. 65-66.

New man [see also, Old man, infra]

  • N2 p1198 to Ro. 6.6 “Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin.” (The expression occurs elsewhere, in Eph 4:22 [“That ye put off concerning the former conversation the old man, which is corrupt according to the deceitful lusts;”]; Col 3:9 [“Lie not one to another, seeing that ye have put off the old man with his deeds;”] and always means the man of old, corrupt human nature, the inborn tendency to evil in all men. In Ro 6:6 it is the natural man himself; in Eph 4:22; Col 3:9 his ways. Positionally, in the reckoning of God, the old man is crucified, and the believer is exhorted to make this good in experience, reckoning it to be so by definitely “putting off” the old man and “putting on” the new Col 3:8-14; Eph 4:24, Cmt. on Eph 4:24, note 3.)
  • Ep. 4.17-29 “…And that ye put on the new man, which after God is created in righteousness and true holiness.”
  • N3 p1253 to Ep. 4.24: “The new man is the regenerate man as distinguished from the old man Cmt. on Ro 6:6 and is a new man as having become a partaker of the divine nature and life 2Pe 1:4 [2 Peter 1:4  “Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises: that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust.”]; Col 3:3-4 [“3 For ye are dead, and your life is hid with Christ in God. 4 When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, then shall ye also appear with him in glory.”] and in no sense the old man made over, or improved 2Co 5:17 [“Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new.”]; Ga 6:15 [“For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision, but a new creature.”]; Eph 2:10 [“  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them.”]; Col 3:10  [“And have put on the new man, which is renewed in knowledge after the image of him that created him:”]. The new man is Christ, “formed” in the believer Ga 2:20 [“I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me.”]; 4:19 [“Galatians 4:19  My little children, of whom I travail in birth again until Christ be formed in you,”]; Col 1:27 [“To whom God would make known what is the riches of the glory of this mystery among the Gentiles; which is Christ in you, the hope of glory:”]; 1Jo 4:12 [“1 John 4:12  No man hath seen God at any time. If we love one another, God dwelleth in us, and his love is perfected in us.”]. Margin: righteousness Cmt. on Ro 10:10.” Natural: Paul’s characteristic word for the unrenewed man (1 Cor. 2.14).

New Testament: Christ’s pre-authentication of N1 p1138.

Natural: Paul’s characteristic word for the unrenewed man (1 Cor. 2.14).

Nicolaitanism: N2 p188 (The “gainsaying of Korah” was intrusion into the priest’s office (“no man taketh this honour unto himself,” (Heb. 5.4).  It was an attempt to create a priestly order without the divine authority (5.10). The modern analogue is Nicolaitanism (Rev. 2.6, 15), the division  of an equal brotherhood (Mt. 23.8) into “clergy” and “laity”; a vastly different thing from the due recognition of ministry-gifts (1 Cor. 12.4-31; Eph. 4., 8, 11, 12), or of elders and deacons (1 Tim. 3.1-13; Tit. 1.5-9).

Offerings in the Bible:

  • Drink offering. 1st mentioned in Gen. 35.14; N2 p51. (2) The burnt offering. N1 p126 (also gives the creature acceptable for sacrifice & their sacrificial meaning). (3) Sweet savour offerings (typify Christ in His own perfections . . .). N2 p127. (4) The meal offering. N3 p127. (4) The peace-offering. (5) The sin offering. N1 p129. (6) The trespass offerings. N1 p131. [The law of offerings: Lev. 6-7. See N1 p 134.]
  • N1 p126 to Leviticus 1.3 “If his offering be a burnt sacrifice of the herd, let him offer a male without blemish: he shall offer it of his own voluntary will at the door of the tabernacle of the congregation before the LORD.” [The burnt-offering (1) typifies Christ offering Himself without spot to God in delight to do His Father’s will even in death. (2) it is atoning because the believer has not had this delight in the will of God; and (3) substitutionary (Le 1:4) because Christ did it in the sinner’s stead. But the thought of penalty is not prominent. Heb 9:11-14; 10:5-7; Ps 40:6-8; Php 2:8. The emphatic words Le 1:3-5 are “burnt-sacrifice,” “voluntary,” “it shall be accepted for him,” and “atonement.”
    The creatures acceptable for sacrifice are five:
    (1) The bullock, or ox, typifies Christ as the patient and enduring Servant 1Co 9:9-10; Heb 12:2-3 “obedient unto death” Isa 52:13-15; Php 2:5-8. His offering in this character is substitutionary, for this we have not been.
    (2) The sheep, or lamb, typifies Christ in unresisting self-surrender to the death of the cross Isa 53:7; Ac 8:32-35.
    (3) The goat typifies the sinner Mt 25:33 and, when used sacrificially, Christ, as “numbered with the transgressors” Isa 53:12; Lu 23:33 and “made sin,” and “a curse” Ga 3:13; 2Co 5:21 as the sinner’s substitute.
    (4,5) The turtle-dove or pigeon. Naturally a symbol of mourning innocency Isa 38:14; 59:11; Mt 23:37; Heb 7:26 is associated with poverty in Le 5:7 and speaks of Him who for our sakes become poor Lu 9:58 and whose pathway of poverty which began with laying aside “the form of God,” ended in the sacrifice through which we became rich 2Co 8:9; Php 2:6-8. The sacrifice of the poor Man becomes the poor man’s sacrifice. Lu 2:24. These grades of typical sacrifice test the measure of our apprehension of the varied aspects of Christ’s one sacrifice on the cross. The mature believer should see Christ crucified in all these aspects.]
  • N2 p126 to Leviticus 4 “And he shall put his hand upon the head of the burnt offering; and it shall be accepted for him to make atonement for him.”(The laying of the offerer’s hand signified acceptance and identification if himself with his offering. In type it answered to the believer’s faith accepting and identifying himself with Christ Ro 4:5; 6:3-11. The believer is justified by faith, and his faith is reckoned for righteousness, because his faith identifies him with Christ, who died as his sin-offering 2Co 5:21; 1Pe 2:24. Margin: atonement Cmt. on Ex 29:33.)
  • N1 p127 to Leviticus 1.8 “And the priests, Aaron’s sons, shall lay the parts, the head, and the fat, in order upon the wood that is on the fire which is upon the altar:” (Fire. Essentially as symbol of God’s holiness. As such it expresses God in three ways: (1) In judgment upon that which His holiness utterly condemns (e.g.) Ge 19:24; Mr 9:43-48; Re 20:15; (2) in the manifestation of Himself, and of that which He approves Ex 3:2; 1Pe 1:7; Ex 13:21; and (3) in purification (e.g) 1Co 3:12-14; Mal 3:2-3. So, in Leviticus, the fire which only manifests the sweet savour of the burnt-, meal-, and peace- offerings, wholly consumes the sin-offering. Margin: fat That which burns most quickly — devotedness, zeal.)
  • N2 p127 to Leviticus 1.9 “But his inwards and his legs shall he wash in water: and the priest shall burn all on the altar, to be a burnt sacrifice, an offering made by fire, of a sweet savour unto the LORD.” (The sweet savour offerings are so called because they typify Christ in His own perfections, and in His affectionate devotion to the Father’s will. The non-sweet savour offerings typify Christ as bearing the whole demerit of the sinner. Both are substantial. In our place Christ, in the burnt-offering, makes good our lack of devotedness, and, in the sin- and trespass-offerings, suffers because of our disobediences.)
  • N3 p127 to Leviticus 2.1 “And when any will offer a meat offering unto the LORD, his offering shall be of fine flour; and he shall pour oil upon it, and put frankincense thereon:” (The meal-offering. The fine flour speaks of the evenness and balance of the character of Christ; of that perfection in which no quality was in excess, none lacking; the fire, of His testing by suffering, even unto death; frankincense; the fragrance of His life Godward (see) Ex 30:34 absence of leaven, His character as “the Truth” (see) Ex 12:8 absence of honey;–His was not that mere natural sweetness which may exist quite apart from grace; oil mingled, Christ as born of the Spirit Mt 1:18-23 oil upon, Christ as baptized with the Spirit Joh 1:32; 6:27 the oven, the unseen sufferings of Christ–His inner agonies Heb 2:18; Mt 27:45-46 the pan, His more evident sufferings (e.g.) Mt 27:27-31 salt, the pungency of the truth of God–that which arrests the action of leaven.)
  • N1, 2 p128 to Leviticus 2.11. “No meat offering, which ye shall bring unto the LORD, shall be made with leaven: for ye shall burn no leaven, nor any honey, in any offering of the LORD made by fire.” (1 For meanings of leaven see Mat 13:.33. Also Le 7:13, Cmt. on Le 7:13. 2 Honey is mere natural sweetness and could not symbolize the divine graciousness of the Lord Jesus.)
  • N4 p128 to Leviticus 3.1. “And if his oblation be a sacrifice of peace offering, if he offer it of the herd; whether it be a male or female, he shall offer it without blemish before the LORD.” (The peace-offering. The whole work of Christ in relation to the believer’s peace is here in type. He made peace, Col 1:20 proclaimed peace, Eph 2:17 and is our peace, Eph 2:14. In Christ God and the sinner meet in peace; God is propitiated, the sinner reconciled–both alike satisfied with what Christ has done. But all this at the cost of blood and fire. The details speak of fellowship. This brings in prominently the thought of fellowship with God through Christ. Hence the peace-offering is set forth as affording food for the priests Y+3″>Le 7:31-34. Observe that it is the breast (affections) and shoulders (strength) upon which we as priests 1Pe 2:9 feed in fellowship with the Father. This it is which makes the peace-offering especially a thank-offering. E+1″>Le 7:11-12.)
  • N1 p 129 to Leviticus 4.3. “Leviticus 4:3  If the priest that is anointed do sin according to the sin of the people; then let him bring for his sin, which he hath sinned, a young bullock without blemish unto the LORD for a sin offering.” (The sin-offering, though still Christ, is Christ seen laden with the believer’s sin, absolutely in the sinner’s place and stead, and not, as in the sweet savour offerings, in His own perfections. It is Christ’s death as viewed in Isa 53:1-12; Ps 22:1-31; Mt 26:28; 1Pe 2:24; 3:18. But note 4+6″>Le 6:24-30 how the essential holiness of Him who was “made sin for us” 2Co 5:21; Isa 1:1-66:24. The sin-offerings are expiatory, substitutional, efficacious Le 4:12,29,35 and have in view the vindication of the law through substitutional sacrifice.)
  • N1 p 130 to Leviticus 4.12. “Even the whole bullock shall he carry forth without the camp unto a clean place, where the ashes are poured out, and burn him on the wood with fire: where the ashes are poured out shall he be burnt.” (Cf. Ex 29:14; Le 16:27; Nu 19:3; Heb 13:10-13. The last passage is the interpretative one. The “camp” was Judaism– a religion of forms and ceremonies. “Jesus, also, that He might sanctify separate, or set apart for God the people with or ‘through’ His own blood, suffered without the gate” temple gate, city gate, i.e. Judaism civil and religious; Heb 13:12 but how does this sanctify, or set apart, a people? “Let us go forth therefore unto Him without the camp Judaism then, Judaized Christianity now–anything religious which denies Him as our sin-offering bearing His reproach” Heb 13:13. The sin-offering, “burned without the camp,” typifies this aspect of the death of Christ. The cross becomes a new altar, in a new place, where, without the smallest merit in themselves, the redeemed gather to offer, as believer-priests, spiritual sacrifices. Heb 13:15; 1Pe 2:5. The bodies of the sin-offering beasts were not burned without the camp, as some have fancied, because “saturated with sin,” and unfit for a holy camp. Rather, an unholy camp was an unfit place for a holy sin-offering. The dead body of our Lord was not “saturated with sin,” though in it our sins had been borne 1Pe 2:24.)
    • N1 p131 to Leviticus 5.6. “And he shall bring his trespass offering unto the LORD for his sin which he hath sinned, a female from the flock, a lamb or a kid of the goats, for a sin offering; and the priest shall make an atonement for him concerning his sin.” (The trespass-offerings have in view rather the injury which sin does than its guilt— which is the sin-offering aspect. What is due to God’s rights in every human being is here meant. Ps 51:4, is a perfect expression of this.)
    • N1 p133 to Leviticus 6.13 “Leviticus 6:13  The fire shall ever be burning upon the altar; it shall never go out.” (Cmt. on Le 1:8. Here the fire expresses also the undying devotedness of Christ.)
    • N1 p134 to Leviticus 7.11 “And this is the law of the sacrifice of peace offerings, which he shall offer unto the LORD.” (In the “law of the offerings,” the peace-offering is taken out of its place as third of the sweet savour offerings, and placed alone, and after all the non-sweet savour offerings. The explanation is as simple as the fact is beautiful. In revealing the offerings Jehovah works from Himself out to the sinner. Cmt. on Ex 25:10. The whole burnt-offering comes first as meeting what is due to the divine affections, and the trespass-offering last as meeting the simplest aspect of sin– its injuriousness. But the sinner begins of necessity with that which lies nearest to a newly awakened conscience–a sense, namely, that because of sin he is at enmity with God. His first need, therefore, is peace with God. And that is precisely the Gospel order. Christ’s first message is, “Peace” Joh 20:19 afterward He shows them His hands and His side. It is the order as 2Co 5:18-21 first “the word of reconciliation,” M”>Le 7:19, then the trespass- and sin-offering, O”>Le 7:21. Experience thus reverses the order of revelation.)
    • N2 p134 to Leviticus 7.13. “Leviticus 7:13  Besides the cakes, he shall offer for his offering leavened bread with the sacrifice of thanksgiving of his peace offerings.” (The use of leaven here is significant. Peace with God is something which the believer shares with God. Christ is our peace-offering Eph 2:13. Any thanksgiving for peace must, first of all, present Him. In verse 12 we have this, in type, and so leaven is excluded. In verse 13 it is the offerer who gives thanks for his participation in the peace, and so leaven fitly signifies, that though having peace with God through the work of another, there is still evil in him. This is illustrated in Am 4:5 where the evil in Israel is before God.)
    • N1 p135 to Leviticus 8.2. “Take Aaron and his sons with him, and the garments, and the anointing oil, and a bullock for the sin offering, and two rams, and a basket of unleavened bread;” (The priests did not consecrate themselves, all was done by another, in this instance Moses, acting for Jehovah. The priests simply presented their bodies in the sense of Ro 12:1.)
    • N1 p136 to Leviticus 8.12. “And he poured of the anointing oil upon Aaron’s head, and anointed him, to sanctify him.” (Two important distinctions are made in the case of the high priest, thus confirming his typical relation to Christ the anti-type: (1) Aaron is anointed before the sacrifices are slain, while in the case of the priests the application of blood precedes the anointing. Christ the sinless One required no preparation for receiving the anointing oil, symbol of the Holy Spirit; (2) upon the high priest only was the anointing oil poured. “God giveth not the Spirit by measure unto him” Joh 3:34. “Thy God hath anointed Thee with the oil of gladness above Thy fellows.” Heb 1:9.)
    • N1 p147 to Leviticus 16.5. “And he shall take of the congregation of the children of Israel two kids of the goats for a sin offering, and one ram for a burnt offering.” (The two goats. The offering of the high priest for himself has no anti-type in Christ Heb 7:26-27. The typical interest centres upon the two goats and the high priest. Typically (1) all is done by the high priest Heb 1:3 “by Himself”), the people only bring the sacrifice Mt 26:47; 27:24-25. (2) The goat slain (Jehovah’s lot) is that aspect of Christ’s work which vindicates the holiness and righteousness of God as expressed in the law Ro 3:24-26 and is expiatory. (3) The living goat typifies that aspect of Christ’s work which puts away our sins from before God Heb 9:26; Ro 8:33-34. (4) The high priest entering the holiest, typifies Christ entering “heaven itself” with “His own blood” for us Heb 9:11-12. His blood makes that to be a “throne of grace,” and “mercy seat” which else must have been a throne of judgment. (5) For us, the priests of the New Covenant, there is what Israel never had, a rent veil Mt 27:51; Heb 10:19-20. So that, for worship and blessing, we enter, in virtue of His blood, where He is, into the holiest Heb 4:14-16; 10:19-22.
      The atonement of Christ, as interpreted by the O.T. sacrificial types, has these necessary elements:(1) It is substitutionary–the offering takes the offerer’s place in death. (2) The law is not evaded but honored–every sacrificial death was an execution of the sentence of the law. (3) The sinlessness of Him who bore our sins is expressed in every animal sacrifice–it must be without blemish. (4) The effect of the atoning work of Christ is typified (a) in the promises, “it shall be forgiven him”; and (b) in the peace-offering, the expression of fellowship–the highest privilege of the saint. Cmt. on Ex 29:33)
  • N1 p148 to Leviticus 16.6. “And Aaron shall offer his bullock of the sin offering, which is for himself, and make an atonement for himself, and for his house.” (Atonement. The biblical use and meaning of the word must be sharply distinguished from its use in theology. In theology it is term which covers the whole sacrificial and redemptive work of Christ. In the O.T. atonement is the English word used to translate the Hebrew words which mean “cover,” “coverings,” or “to cover.” Atonement (at-one-ment) is, therefore, not a translation of the hebrew, but a purely theologic concept. The Levitical offerings “covered” the sins of Israel until, and in anticipation of the Cross, but did not “take away” Heb 10:4 those sins. These were the “sins done aforetime” (“covered” meantime by the Levitical sacrifices), which God “passed over” Ro 3:25 for which “passing over” God’s righteousness was never vindicated until, in the Cross, Jesus Christ was “set forth a propitiation.” See “Propitiation,” Cmt. on Ro 3:25. It was the Cross, not the Levitical sacrifices which made “at-one-ment.” The O.T. sacrifices enabled God to go on with a guilty people because they typified the Cross. To the offerer they were the confession of his desert of death, and the expression of his faith; to God they were the “shadows” Heb 10:1 of which Christ was the reality. Margin: atonement Cmt. on Ex 29:33.)
  • N1, 2 p150 to Leviticus 17.11. “Leviticus 17:11  For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul.” ((1) The value of the “life” is the measure of the value of the “blood.” This gives the blood of Christ its inconceivable value. When it was shed the sinless God-man gave His life. “It is not possible that the blood of bulls and of goats could take away sins” Heb 10:4. (2) it is not the blood in the veins of the sacrifice, but the blood upon the altar which is efficacious. The Scripture knows nothing of salvation by the imitation or influence of Christ’s life, but only by that life yielded up on the cross.
    2 The meaning of all sacrifice is here explained. Every offering was an execution of the sentence of the law upon a substitute for the offender, and every such offering pointed forward to that substitutional death of Christ which alone vindicated the righteousness of God in passing over the sins of those who offered the typical sacrifices Ro 3:24-25; Ex 29:36. Margin: atonement. Cmt. on Ex 29:33.)
  • N1 p192 to Numbers 19.2 “Numbers 19:2  This is the ordinance of the law which the LORD hath commanded, saying, Speak unto the children of Israel, that they bring thee a red heifer without spot, wherein is no blemish, and upon which never came yoke:” (The red heifer: Type of the sacrifice of Christ as the ground of the cleansing of the believer from the defilement contracted in his pilgrim walk through this world, and illustration of the method of his cleansing. The order is: (1) the slaying of the sacrifice; (2) the sevenfold sprinkling of the blood, typical public testimony before the eyes of all of the complete and never-to-be-repeated putting away of all the believer’s sin as before God. Heb 9:12-14; 10:10-12. (3) the reduction of the sacrifice to ashes which are preserved and become a memorial of the sacrifice; (4) the cleansing from defilement (sin has two aspects–guilt and uncleanness) by sprinkling with the ashes mingled with water. Water is a type of both the Spirit and the Word. Joh 7:37-39. Eph 5:26. The operation typified is this: the Holy Spirit used the Word to convict the believer of some evil allowed in his life to the hindering of his joy, growth, and service. Thus convicted, he remembers that the guilt of his sin has been met by the sacrifice of Christ 1Jo 1:7. Instead, therefore, of despairing, the convicted believer judges and confesses the defiling thing as unworthy a saint, and is forgiven and cleansed Joh 13:3-10; 1Jo 1:7-10.)
  • Numbers 28.29: The order of offerings.

Old man:

  • [See also, New man, supra]
  • N1 to Ge. 5.1, p12 “This is the book of the generations of Adam. In the day that God created man, in the likeness of God made he him;” (Adam, as the natural head of the race Lu 3:38 is a contrasting type of Christ, the Head of the new creation. See Ro 5:14; 1Co 15:21-22,45-47. <Adam, as the natural head of the race Lu 3:38 is a contrasting type of Christ, the Head of the new creation. See Ro 5:14; 1Co 15:21-22,45-47.)
  • N2 p1198 to Ro. 6.6 “Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin.” (The expression occurs elsewhere, in Eph 4:22 [“That ye put off concerning the former conversation the old man, which is corrupt according to the deceitful lusts;”]; Col 3:9 [“Lie not one to another, seeing that ye have put off the old man with his deeds;”] and always means the man of old, corrupt human nature, the inborn tendency to evil in all men. In Ro 6:6 it is the natural man himself; in Eph 4:22; Col 3:9 his ways. Positionally, in the reckoning of God, the old man is crucified, and the believer is exhorted to make this good in experience, reckoning it to be so by definitely “putting off” the old man and “putting on” the new Col 3:8-14; Eph 4:24, on Eph 4:24, note 3.)
  • 4.17-29 “…And that ye put on the new man, which after God is created in righteousness and true holiness.”
  • N3 p1253 to Ep. 4.24: “The new man is the regenerate man as distinguished from the old man on Ro 6:6 and is a new man as having become a partaker of the divine nature and life 2Pe 1:4 [2 Peter 1:4 “Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises: that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust.”]; Col 3:3-4 [“3 For ye are dead, and your life is hid with Christ in God. 4 When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, then shall ye also appear with him in glory.”] and in no sense the old man made over, or improved 2Co 5:17 [“Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new.”]; Ga 6:15 [“For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision, but a new creature.”]; Eph 2:10 [“  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them.”]; Col 3:10  [“And have put on the new man, which is renewed in knowledge after the image of him that created him:”]. The new man is Christ, “formed” in the believer Ga 2:20 [“I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me.”]; 4:19 [“Galatians 4:19  My little children, of whom I travail in birth again until Christ be formed in you,”]; Col 1:27 [“To whom God would make known what is the riches of the glory of this mystery among the Gentiles; which is Christ in you, the hope of glory:”]; 1Jo 4:12 [“1 John 4:12  No man hath seen God at any time. If we love one another, God dwelleth in us, and his love is perfected in us.”]. Margin: righteousness Cmt. on Ro 10:10.”

Parables, OT: N2 to Zechzariah 11.7, p975 “And I will feed the flock of slaughter, even you, O poor of the flock. And I took unto me two staves; the one I called Beauty, and the other I called Bands; and I fed the flock.” (The scene belongs to the first advent. Beauty and Bands–literally “graciousness and union”; the first signifying God’s attitude toward His people Israel, in sending His Son Mt 21:37 the second, His purpose to reunite Judah and Ephraim Eze 37:15-22. Christ, at His first advent, came with grace Joh 1:17 to offer union Mt 4:17 and was sold for thirty pieces of silver Zec 11:12-13. “Beauty” (i.e. graciousness) was “cut in sunder” (Zec 8:10-11), signifying that Judah was abandoned to the destruction foretold in Zec 11:1-6 and fulfilled A.D. 70. After the betrayal of the Lord for thirty pieces of silver (Zec 11:12-13) “Bands” (i.e. union) was broken (Zec 11:14), signifying the abandonment, for the time, of the purpose to reunite Judah and Israel. The order of Zech. 11. is, (1) the wrath against the land (Zec 11:1-6), fulfilled in the destruction of Jerusalem after the rejection of Christ Lu 19:41-44. (2) the cause of that wrath in the sale and rejection of Christ vs. (Zec 11:7-14); (3) the rise of the “idol shepherd,” the Beast Da 7:8; Re 19:20 and his destruction (Zec 11:15-17)).
               NT Parables:
1. Mt. 9.16-17; Mark 2.21; Lk. 5.36-39. Parable of the garment & bottles.
2. Mt. 13 gives 7 parables, called by our Lord, “mysteries of the kingdom of heaven.” See N1 p1014 (These parables, taken together, describe the result of the presence of the Gospel in the world during the present age, that is, the time of seed-sowing which began with our Lord’s personal ministry, and ends with the “harvest” (vs. 40-43). Briefly, that result is the mingled tares and wheat, good fish and bad, in the sphere of Christian profession.  It is Christendom.).
3. Mt. 21.28-32; Parable of the two sons.
4. Mt. 21.33-46; Mk. 12.1-9; Lk 20.9-19; Cf. Isa. 5.1-7: Parable of the householder demanding fruit from his vineyard.
5. Mt. 22.1-14; Lk 14.16-24: Parable of the marriage feast.
6. Mt. 24.32, 33; Mk. 13.28-33; Lk. 21.29-31: Parable of the fig tree.
7. Lk. 4.1-20, 8.4-15; Mt. 13.1-7; Mk. 4.3-9, 13-20. Parable of the sower.
8. Lk 4.21-25; Cf. Mt. 5.15, 16; Lk. 8.16; 11.33. Parable of the candle.
9. Lk. 4. 30-32; Mt. 13.31, 32, note, Lk. 13.18-19. Parable of the mustard seed.
10. Lk. 5.36-39; Mt. 9.16; Mk. 2.21-22. Parable of the garment & bottles.
11. Lk. 7.41-50. Parable of the creditor & two debtors.
12. Lk. 8.4-23; Mt.13.1-23; Mk. 4.1-20. Parable of the sower.
13. Lk. 8.16-18; Lk. 11.33; Mt. 5.15, 16; Mk. 4.21-23. Parable of the lighted candle.
14. Lk. 10.30-37. Parable of the good Samaritan.
15. Lk. 11.5-10. Parable of the importunate friend
16. Lk. 11. 11-13. Parable of the fatherhood.
2. Luke 11:24-26: Parable of the unclean spirit.
3. Luke 11:33-36: Parable of the lighted candle.
3. Luke 12:16-34: Parable of the rich fool (take no heed for what you eat or wear).
4. Luke 12:35-40: Parable of the return from the wedding.
5. Luke 12: 42-48: Outstanding parable that teaches our responsibility in light of our Lord’s coming.
6. Luke 13, 6-9; ;Cf. Isa. 5.1-7; Mt. 21.18-20: Parable of the fig tree.
7. Luke 13:18-19; Mt. 13.31, 32, note; Mk. 4.30-32: Parable of the mustard seed.
8. Lk. 13.20-21; Mt. 13.33, note. Parable of the Leaven.
8. Luke 14: 7-14: Parable of the impolite guests.
9. Luke 14:15-24 Mt. 22.1-14: Parable of the great supper.
10. Luke 14:28-30: Parable of Building a tower.
11. Luke 14: 31-33: Parable of a king going to war.
12. Lk. 14.34-35; Cf. Mt. 5.13; Mk. 9.50: Parable of the savourless salt.
12. Luke 15:3-7; Cf. Mt. 18.12-14: Parable of the lost sheep.
13. Luke 15:8-10:  Parable of the lost coin.
14. Luke 15:11-32 Parable of the lost son.
15. Luke 16:1-13: Parable of the unjust steward.
16. Luke 16:19-31: Parable of the rich man and Lazarus.
17. Luke 18:2-7: Parable of the unjust judge.
18. Luke 18:9-14: Parable of the Pharisee and Publican.
19. Luke 19:11-28; See Lk. 17.21, note; Acts 1.6-8, note: Parable of the ten pounds.
20. Luke 20:9-19; Mt. 21.33-34; Mk. 12.1-12. Cf. Isa. 5.1-7). :Parable of the vinyard.

Paradise, hades, and Abraham’s bosom. N1 to Luke 16.23, p1098 “And in hell he lift up his eyes, being in torments, and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.” (Gr. hades, “the unseen world,” is revealed as the place of departed human spirits between death and resurrection. The word occurs, Mt 11:23; 16:18; Lu 10:15; Ac 2:27,31; Re 1:18; 6:8; 20:13-14 and is the equivalent of the O.T. “sheol.” Cmt. on Hab 2:5. The Septuagint invariably renders sheol by hades.

Summary: (1) Hades before the ascension of Christ. The passages in which the word occurs make it clear that hades was formerly in two divisions, the abodes respectively of the saved and of the lost. The former was called “paradise” and “Abraham’s bosom.” Both designations were Talmudic, but adopted by Christ in Lu 16:22; 23:43. The blessed dead were with Abraham, they were conscious and were “comforted” Lu 16:25. The believing malefactor was to be, that day, with Christ in “paradise.” The lost were separated from the saved by a “great gulf fixed” Lu 16:26. The representative man of the lost who are now in hades is the rich man of Lu 16:19-31. He was alive, conscious, in the full exercise of his faculties, memory, etc., and in torment. (2) Hades since the ascension of Christ. So far as the unsaved dead are concerned, no change of their place or condition is revealed in Scripture. At the judgment of the great white throne, hades will give them up, they will be judged, and will pass into the lake of fire Re 20:13-14. But a change has taken place which affects paradise. Paul was “caught up to the third heaven. . .into paradise” 2Co 12:1-4. Paradise, therefore, is now in the immediate presence of God. It is believed that Eph 4:8-10 indicates the time of the change. “When he ascended up on high he led a multitude of captives.” It is immediately added that He had previously “descended first into the lower parts of the earth,” i.e. the paradise division of Hades. During the present church-age the saved who died are “absent from the body, at home with the Lord.” The wicked dead in hades, and the righteous dead “at home with the Lord,” alike await the resurrection Job 19:25; 1Co 15:52. Cmt. on Mt 5:22.).

Passover: Order of events of the last Passover N2 p1037 to Mt. 26.20.

Paul an apostle: N2 p 1241-2.

Peace in Scripture:

  • N4 p128 to Leviticus 3.1. “And if his oblation be a sacrifice of peace offering, if he offer it of the herd; whether it be a male or female, he shall offer it without blemish before the LORD.” (The peace-offering. The whole work of Christ in relation to the believer’s peace is here in type. He made peace, Col 1:20 proclaimed peace, Eph 2:17 and is our peace, Eph 2:14. In Christ God and the sinner meet in peace; God is propitiated, the sinner reconciled–both alike satisfied with what Christ has done. But all this at the cost of blood and fire. The details speak of fellowship. This brings in prominently the thought of fellowship with God through Christ. Hence the peace-offering is set forth as affording food for the priests Y+3″>Le 7:31-34. Observe that it is the breast (affections) and shoulders (strength) upon which we as priests 1Pe 2:9 feed in fellowship with the Father. This it is which makes the peace-offering especially a thank-offering. E+1″>Le 7:11-12.)
  • N1 p134 to Leviticus 7.11 “And this is the law of the sacrifice of peace offerings, which he shall offer unto the LORD.” (In the “law of the offerings,” the peace-offering is taken out of its place as third of the sweet savour offerings, and placed alone, and after all the non-sweet savour offerings. The explanation is as simple as the fact is beautiful. In revealing the offerings Jehovah works from Himself out to the sinner. on Ex 25:10. The whole burnt-offering comes first as meeting what is due to the divine affections, and the trespass-offering last as meeting the simplest aspect of sin– its injuriousness. But the sinner begins of necessity with that which lies nearest to a newly awakened conscience–a sense, namely, that because of sin he is at enmity with God. His first need, therefore, is peace with God. And that is precisely the Gospel order. Christ’s first message is, “Peace” Joh 20:19 afterward He shows them His hands and His side. It is the order as 2Co 5:18-21 first “the word of reconciliation,” M”>Le 7:19, then the trespass- and sin-offering, O”>Le 7:21. Experience thus reverses the order of revelation.)
  • N2 to Le. 7.13, p134 “Besides the cakes, he shall offer for his offering leavened bread with the sacrifice of thanksgiving of his peace offerings.” (The use of leaven here is significant. Peace with God is something which the believer shares with God. Christ is our peace-offering Eph 2:13. Any thanksgiving for peace must, first of all, present Him. In verse 12 we have this, in type, and so leaven is excluded. In verse 13 it is the offerer who gives thanks for his participation in the peace, and so leaven fitly signifies, that though having peace with God through the work of another, there is still evil in him. This is illustrated in Am 4:5 where the evil in Israel is before God. The use of leaven here is significant. Peace with God is something which the believer shares with God. Christ is our peace-offering Eph 2:13. Any thanksgiving for peace must, first of all, present Him. In verse 12 we have this, in type, and so leaven is excluded. In verse 13 it is the offerer who gives thanks for his participation in the peace, and so leaven fitly signifies, that though having peace with God through the work of another, there is still evil in him. This is illustrated in Am 4:5 where the evil in Israel is before God.)
  • N2 p1009 to Mt. 10.34 “Matthew 10:34 Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but a sword.” (Cf. Joh 14:27. Peace is spoken of in Scripture in three ways: (1) “Peace with God” Ro 5:1 this is the work of Christ into which the individual enters by faith Eph 2:14-17; Ro 5:1. (2) “The peace of God” Php 4:7 inward peace, the state of soul of that believer who, having entered into peace with God through faith in Christ, has also committed to God through prayer and supplication with thanksgiving all his anxieties Lu 7:50; Php 4:6. (3) Peace “on earth” Lu 2:14; Ps 72:7; 85:10; Isa 9:6; 11:1-12 the universal prevalency of peace in the earth under the kingdom. Mt 10:34 was Christ’s warning that the truth which He was proclaiming would not bring in the kingdom age of peace, but conflict rather. Joh 14:27.)

Pharisees: N2 p996 (defined) to Mt. 3 “Matthew 3:7  But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees come to his baptism, he said unto them, O generation of vipers, who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come?” [So called from a Heb. word meaning “separate.” After the ministry of the post-exilic prophets ceased, godly men called “Chasidim” (saints) arose who sought to keep alive reverence for the law amongst the descendants of the Jews who returned from the Babylonian captivity. This movement degenerated into the Pharisaism of our Lord’s day–a letter-strictness which overlaid the law with traditional interpretations held to have been communicated by Jehovah to Moses as oral explanations of equal authority with the law itself. (cf. Mt 15:2-3; Mr 7:8-13; Ga 1:14).
The Pharisees were strictly a sect. A member was “chaber” (i.e. “knit together,”) Jg 20:11 and took an obligation to remain true to the principles of Pharisaism. They were correct, moral, zealous, and self-denying, but self-righteous Lu 18:9 and destitute of the sense of sin and need Lu 7:39. They were the foremost prosecutors of Jesus Christ and the objects of His unsparing denunciation (e.g.)

Prayer:

  • N2 p957 (Prayer in OT in contrast w/prayer in NT in 2 respects: (1) in former the basis of prayer is a covenant of God, or an appeal to his revealed character as merciful, gracious, etc. In latter, the basis is relationship: “When ye pray, say, Our Father” (Mt. 6.9). (2) A comparison, e.g. of the prayers of Moses and Paul, e.g. will show that one was praying for an earthly people whose dangers and blessings were earthly; the other for a heavenly people whose dangers and blessings were spiritual.).
  • N2 p 970 to Zech. 7.1-14 Their fast was a mere form; they should have heeded the prophets; why their prayers were not answered.)
    N1 p980 to Malachi 1.6: Cf. Isa. 63.16, The relationship here is national, not personal (Jer. 3.18, 19): here, apparently, the Jews were calling Jehovah “Father,” but yielding Him no filial obedience.  See John 8. 37-19; Rom. 9.1-8.
  • N1 p1089 to Lk. 11.1 “And it came to pass, that, as he was praying in a certain place, when he ceased, one of his disciples said unto him, Lord, teach us to pray, as John also taught his disciples.” (“This is the central NT passage on prayer.  In the Sermon on the Mount Christ had announced the new basis of prayer, viz.: relatioinship (Mt. 6.9, 28-32).  The believer is a child of God through the new birth (John 3.3, note).  The clear revelation of theis fact at once establishes the reasonableness of prayer; a reasonableness against which the argument from the apparent uniformity of natural law shatters itself.  God is more than a Creator, bringing a universe into being, and establishing laws for it; more than a decree-maker determining future events by an eternal fiat.  Above all this is the divine family for whom the universe with its laws exists (Col. 1.16-20; Heb. 1.2; 2.10, 11; Rom. 8.17): “When ye pray, say Our Father.”  What God habitually does in the material universe concerns the reverent investigator of that universe.  What He may do in His own family concerns Him, and them, and is matter for divine promise and revelation.  Science, which deals only with natural phenomena, cannot intrude there (Cor. 2.9).
    “Christ’s law of prayer may be thus summarized: (1) He grounds prayer upon relationship, and reveals God as freely charging himself with all the responsibilities, as His heart glows with all the affections of a Father toward all who believe on Jesus Christ Mt 6:25; 7:9-11. Prayer, therefore, is a child’s petition to an all-wise, all-loving, and all-powerful, Father-God. (2) In the so-called Lord’s prayer Christ gives an incomparable model for all prayer. It teaches that right prayer begins with worship; puts the interest of the kingdom before merely personal interest; accepts beforehand the Father’s will, whether to grant or withhold; and petitions for present need, leaving the future to the Father’s care and love. Used as a form, the Lord’s prayer is, dispensationally, upon legal, not church ground; it is not a prayer in the name of Christ (cf) Joh 14:13; 16:24 and it makes human forgiveness, as under the law it must, the condition of divine forgiveness; an order which grace exactly reverses (cf) Eph 4:32. (3) Prayer is to be definite Lu 11:5-6 and, (4) importunate, that is undiscouraged by delayed answers.)

Preaching: 1 Thes. 2.2-13 “2 But even after that we had suffered before, and were shamefully entreated, as ye know, at Philippi, we were bold in our God to speak unto you the gospel of God with much contention. 3 For our exhortation was not of deceit, nor of uncleanness, nor in guile: 4 But as we were allowed of God to be put in trust with the gospel, even so we speak; not as pleasing men, but God, which trieth our hearts. 5 For neither at any time used we flattering words, as ye know, nor a cloke of covetousness; God is witness: 6 Nor of men sought we glory, neither of you, nor yet of others, when we might have been burdensome, as the apostles of Christ. 7 But we were gentle among you, even as a nurse cherisheth her children: 8 So being affectionately desirous of you, we were willing to have imparted unto you, not the gospel of God only, but also our own souls, because ye were dear unto us. 9 For ye remember, brethren, our labour and travail: for labouring night and day, because we would not be chargeable unto any of you, we preached unto you the gospel of God. 10 Ye are witnesses, and God also, how holily and justly and unblameably we behaved ourselves among you that believe: 11 As ye know how we exhorted and comforted and charged every one of you, as a father doth his children, 12 That ye would walk worthy of God, who hath called you unto his kingdom and glory. 13 For this cause also thank we God without ceasing, because, when ye received the word of God which ye heard of us, ye received it not as the word of men, but as it is in truth, the word of God, which effectually worketh also in you that believe.”

Predestination: See foreknowledge. N1 p1250.

Priesthood, NT:

  • Exodus 28.1-29.46
  • N1 p106 to Ex. 28.1 “And take thou unto thee Aaron thy brother, and his sons with him, from among the children of Israel, that he may minister unto me in the priest’s office, even Aaron, Nadab and Abihu, Eleazar and Ithamar, Aaron’s sons.” (Type of Christ, our High Priest. Christ is a priest after the order of Melchizedek, but He executes his priestly office after the pattern of Aaron. Heb. 7. gives the order; Heb. 9., the pattern. on Ge 14:18.”
  • N2 p106 to Ex. 28.2. “And thou shalt make holy garments for Aaron thy brother for glory and for beauty.” (Heb. qodesh= “set apart” for God. Trans. “holy,” v.2; “consecrate,” v.3. Often trans. “sanctify.” See summary, on Zec 8:3. This is always the fundamental idea of a holy, consecrated, separated, or sanctified person or thing–something set apart for God. Infinite confusion would have been spared the reader if qodesh had been uniformly trans. “set apart.”)
  • N1 p108 to Ex. 29.1 “And this is the thing that thou shalt do unto them to hallow them, to minister unto me in the priest’s office: Take one young bullock, and two rams without blemish,” (The priest type of consecration. (Cf. the temple type, 1Ki 8:1-11; 2Ch 5:4,14. The order in Leviticus differs from the order here. In Leviticus the filling the hands precedes the sprinkling. Margin: bullock, rams on Le 1:3.)
  • N3 p108 to Exo. 29.5.
  • N1 p1265.
  • 4.14-16; 5.1-8.13.
  • N1 p1313-14 to 1 Peter 2.9 “But ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light: “The New Testament priesthood, Summary: (1) Until the law was given the head of each family was the family priest Ge 8:20; 26:25; 31:54. (2) When the law was proposed, the promise to perfect obedience was that Israel would be unto God “a kingdom of priests” Ex 19:6. but Israel violated the law, and God shut up the priestly office to the Aaronic family, appointing the tribe of Levi to minister to them, thus constituting the typical priesthood Ex 28:1. (3) In the dispensation of grace, all believers are unconditionally constituted a “kingdom of priests” 1Pe 2:9; Re 1:6 the distinction which Israel failed to achieve by works. The priesthood of the believer is, therefore, a birthright; just as every descendant of Aaron was born to the priesthood Heb 5:1. (4) The chief privilege of a priest is access to God. Under law the high priest only could enter “the holiest of all,” and that but once a year Heb 9:7, but when Christ died, the veil, type of Christ’s human body Heb 10:20 was rent, so that now the believer-priests, equally with Christ the High Priest, have access to God in the holiest Heb 10:19-22. The high Priest is corporeally there Heb 4:14-16; 9:24; 10:19-22. (5) In the exercise of his office the New Testament believer-priest is (1) a sacrificer who offers a threefold sacrifice: (a) his own living body. Ro 12:1; Php 2:17; 2Ti 4:6; 1Jo 3:16; Jas 1:27(b) praise to God, “the fruit of the lips that make mention of His name” (R.V.), to be offered “continually” Heb 13:15; Ex 25:22 “I will commune with thee from above the mercy seat”); (c) his substance Heb 13:16; Ro 12:13; Ga 6:6; 3Jo 1:5-8; Heb 13:2; Ga 6:10; Tit 3:14. (2) The N.T. priest is also an intercessor 1Ti 2:1; Col 4:12.”

Propitiation: N2 p 1195.

Prophecies of Christ: N2 p9 to Gen. 3.15 “Genesis 3:15  And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel.” “The chain of references which begins here includes the promises and prophecies concerning Christ which were fulfilled in His birth and works at His first advent. See, for line of unfulfilled promises and prophecies: “Christ (second advent)” De 30:3. Cmt. on Ac 1:11 “Kingdom” Ge 1:26-28; Zec 12:8 “Kingdom (N.T.)” Lu 1:31; 1Co 15:28 “Day of the Lord” Isa 2:10; Re 19:11.”

Prophecy and prophets:

  • N2 p9 “The chain of references which begins here includes the promises and prophecies concerning Christ which were fulfilled in His bierth and works at His first advent. See, for line of unfulfilled promises and prophecies: ‘Christ (second advent)’ (Deut. 30.3; Acts. 1.9 note); ‘Kingdom’ (Gen. 1.26-28; Zech. 12.8); ‘Kingdom (N.T.)’ (Lk 1.31; 1 Cor. 15.28); ‘Day of the Lord’ (Isa. 2.10; rev. 19.11).”
  • N1 to I Co. 12.10, p1223 “1 Corinthians 12:10 To another the working of miracles; to another prophecy; to another discerning of spirits; to another divers kinds of tongues; to another the interpretation of tongues:” (The N.T. prophet is not ordinarily a foreteller, but rather a forth-teller, one whose gift enabled him to speak “to edification, and exhortation, and comfort” 1Co 14:3.)
  • I Co. 14. Prophecy is the greatest of the gifts.
  • N1 to I Co. 14.1, p1224 “Follow after charity, and desire spiritual gifts, but rather that ye may prophesy.” (The subject is still the pneumatika. Chapter 12, described the gifts and the Body; Chapter 13. the love which alone gives ministry of gift any value; Chapter 14. regulates the ministry of gift in the primitive, apostolic assembly of saints. (1) The important gift is that of prophecy (1Co 1:1)). The N.T. prophet was not merely a preacher, but an inspired preacher, through whom, until the N.T. was written, new revelations suited to the new dispensation were given 1Co 14:29-30. (2) Tongues and the sign gifts are to cease, and meantime must be used with restraint, and only if an interpreter be present 1Co 14:1-19,27-28. (3) In the primitive church there was liberty for the ministry of all the gifts which might be present, but for prophecy more especially 1Co 14:23-26,31,39. (4) In such meetings, when “the whole church” came together “in one place,” women were required to keep silence 1Co 14:34; 11:3-16; 1Ti 2:11-14. (5) These injunctions are declared to be “the commandments of the Lord” 1Co 14:36-37.)
  • N2 p1318 to 2 Pet. 1.19 “We have also a more sure word of prophecy; whereunto ye do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day star arise in your hearts:” (That is, made more sure by fulfillment in part. Fulfilled prophecy is a proof of inspiration bc the Scripture predictions of future events were uttered so long before the events transpired that no merely human sagacity or foresight could have anticipated them, and these predictions are so detailed, minute, and specific, as to exclude the possibility that they were mere fortunate guesses. Hundreds of predictions concerning Israel, the land of Canaan, Babylon, Assyria, Egypt, and numerous personages—so ancient, so singular, so seemingly improbable, as well as so detailed and definite that no mortal could have anticipated them—have been fulfilled by the elements, and by men who were ignorant of them, or who utterly disbelieved them, or who struggled with frantic desperation to avoid their fulfillment. It is certain, therefore, that the Scriptures which contain them are inspired. “Prophecy came not in olden time by the will of man; but holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost” (2 Pet. 1.21).

Psychology: T.A. McMahon, “Psychology and the Evangelical Church,” The Berean Call, March 2006 Vol. 51, No 3 (Although psychology is directly at odds with Biblical principles, it is significantly influencing todays church. It has shipwrecked the faith of many regarding the sufficiency of the Bible. It has sold the church the lie that it can be integrated w/the Bible.).
T.A. McMahon, “Psychology in Prophecy,” The Berean Call, April 2006, Vol. 51, No. 4.

Public Ministry, NT: Peter’s sermon at Pentecost: Acts 2.15-36 (No message could have been more unwelcome to the Jews who had rejected Jesus’ Messianic claims and crucified him.).
        Peter’s 2d sermon: Acts 3:12-26.

Rapture: N1 p 1269 to I Thes. 4.16-17 (“For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first: Then we which are alive and remain shall be caugyt up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lorde in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord.”): Not church saints only, bu t all bodies of the saved, of whatever dispensation, are in cluded in the first resurrection (see 1 Cor. 15.52, note), as here described, but it is peculiarly the “blessed hope” of the Church (cf. Mt. 24.42; 25.13; Lk. 12.26-28; Acts 1.11; Phil. 3.20, 21; Tit. 2.11-13).

Reconciliation: N1 p1263.

Redemption, redeemer:

  • 12.12 – 20.26
    Headnote to Exodus, p71:
    “EXODUS, ‘going out,’ records the redemption out of Egyptian bondage of the descendants of Abraham, and sets forth, in type, all redemption. It is therefore peculiarly the book of redemption. But as all redemption is unto a relationship with God of which worship, fellowship, and service are expressions, so Exodus, in the giving of the law and the provisions of sacrifice and priesthood, becomes not only the book of redemption, but also, in type, of the conditions upon which all relationships with God exist.
    Broadly, the book teaches that redemption is essential to any relationship with a holy God; and that even a redeemed people cannot have fellowship with Him unless constantly cleaned of defilement.
    In EXODUS, God, hitherto connected with the Israelitish people only through His covenant with Abraham, brings them to himself nationally through redemption, puts them under the Mosaic Covenant, and dwells among them in the cloud of glory. Galatians explains the relation of the law to the Abrahamic Covenant. In the Commandments God taught Israel His just demands. Experience under the Commandments convicted Israel of sin; and the provision of priesthood and sacrifice (filled with precious types of Christ) gave a guilty people a way of forgiveness, cleansing, restoration to fellowship, and worship.
    Exodus falls into three chief divisions:. I. Israel in Egypt (1.-15.). II. From the Red Sea to Sinai (16.-18.). III. Israel at Sinai (19.40.)
    The events recorded in Exodus cover a period of 216 years (Ussher).”
  • Exodus 13.20-20.26.
  • N1 to Exodus 14.30, p88 “Thus the LORD saved Israel that day out of the hand of the Egyptians; and Israel saw the Egyptians dead upon the sea shore.” (Redemption: (Exodus type) Summary. Exodus is the book of redemption and teaches: (1) redemption is wholly of God Ex 3:7-8; John 3:16; (2) redemption is through a person. Ex. 2:2, note. John 3:16-17; (3) redemption is by blood 12:13,23,27; 1 Pet. 1:18; (4) redemption is by power Ex. 6:6; 13:14; Rom. 8:2. Isa. 59:20, note. Ro 3:24, note. The blood of Christ redeems the believer from the guilt and penalty of sin. 1Pe 1:18 as the power of the Spirit delivers from the dominion of sin. Rom. 8:2; Eph. 2:2.)”
  • N1 p122 (symbolic meaning of silver—redemption)
  • Headnote to Joshua, p. 259:
    “Joshua records the consummation of the redemption of Israel of Israel out of Egypt; for redemption has two parts: “out,” and “into” (De 6:23). The key-phrase is “Moses My servant is dead” (Jos 1:2). Law, of which Moses is the representative, could never give a sinful people victory (Heb 7:19; Ro 6:14; 8:2-4).
    “In a spiritual sense the book of Joshua is the Ephesians of the Old Testament. “The heavenly” of Ephesians is to the Christian what Canaan was to the Israelite and blessing through divine power (Jos 21:43-45; Eph 1:3)
    “The government, as before, was theocratic; Joshua succeeding Moses as the ruler under God.
    Joshua falls into four parts: I. The conquest, 1.-12. II. The partition of the inheritance, 13.-21. III. Incipient discord, 22. IV. Joshua’s last counsels and death, 23., 24.
    “The events recorded in Joshua cover a period of 26 years (Ussher).”
  • N2 p103 to Exodus 26.19 “And thou shalt make forty sockets of silver under the twenty boards; two sockets under one board for his two tenons, and two sockets under another board for his two tenons.” (Silver symbolizes redemption. on Ex 25:1. Cmt. on Ex 38:27. All the tabernacle rests upon silver except the hangings of the gate, the way of access. Cmt. on Ex 27:17.)
  • N1 to Le. 25.49, p161 “Either his uncle, or his uncle’s son, may redeem him, or any that is nigh of kin unto him of his family may redeem him; or if he be able, he may redeem himself.” (The Kinsman-Redeemer. The word goel is used to indicate both the redemption– “to free by paying,” and the Redeemer–“the one who pays.” The case of Ruth and Boaz Ru 2:1; 3:10-18; 4:1-10 perfectly illustrates this beautiful type of Christ. See “Redemption, on Isa 59:20. Margin: redeem Heb. “goel,” Redemp. (Kinsman type). Cmt. on Isa 59:20. ).
  • N1 p.259 to Joshua 1.1: “Joshua (Je-hoshua, meaning Jehovah-Saviour) is a type of Christ, the “Captain of our salvation” Heb 2:10-11. The more important points are: (1) he comes after Moses Joh 1:17; Ro 8:3; 10:4-5; Heb 7:18-19; Ga 3:23-25. (2) He leads to victory. Ro 8:37; 2Co 1:10; 2:14. (3) He is our Advocate when we have suffered defeat Jos 7:5-9; 1Jo 2:1. (4) He allots our portions Eph 1:11; 4:8-11.”
  • N1, 2 to Isa. 59.20, p765 Isaiah 59 “20 And the Redeemer shall come to Zion, and unto them that turn from transgression in Jacob, saith the LORD.” (N1: “Redemption: Kinsman type, summary. The goel, or Kinsman-Redeemer, is a beautiful type of Christ.(1) The kinsman redemption was of persons, and an inheritance Le 25:48,25; Ga 4:5; Eph 1:7,11,14; (2) The Redeemer must be a kinsman Le 25:48-49; Ru 3:12-13; Ga 4:4; Heb 2:14-15.; (3) The Redeemer must be able to redeem Ru 4:4-6; Jer 50:34; Joh 10:11,18; (4) Redemption is effected by the goel paying the just demand in full Le 25:27; 1Pe 1:18-19; Ga 3:13. on Ex 14:30 Cmt. on Ro 3:24.”). (N2 “The time when the “Redeemer shall come to Zion” is fixed, relatively, by Ro 11:23-29 as following the completion of the Gentile Church. That is also the order of the great dispensational passage, Ac 15:14-17.In both, the return of the Lord to Zion follows the outcalling of the Church.”)
  • Isaiah 60:14 “The sons also of them that afflicted thee shall come bending unto thee; and all they that despised thee shall bow themselves down at the soles of thy feet; and they shall call thee, The city of the LORD, The Zion of the Holy One of Israel.”
  • 60.16: “Isaiah 60:16 Thou shalt also suck the milk of the Gentiles, and shalt suck the breast of kings: and thou shalt know that I the LORD am thy Saviour and thy Redeemer, the mighty One of Jacob.”
  • N1 p1195 to Romans 3:24 “Being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus:” (Redemption, “to deliver by paying a price.” The N.T. doctrine. The N.T. records the fulfilment of the O.T. types and prophecies of redemption through the sacrifice of Christ. The completed truth is set forth in the three words which are translated redemption (1) agorazo, “to purchase in the market.” The underlying thought is of a slave-market. The subjects of redemption are “sold under sin” Ro 7:14 but are, moreover, under sentence of death Eze 18:4, Joh 3:18-19; Ro 3:19; Ga 3:10, and the purchase price is the blood of the Redeemer who dies in their stead Ga 3:13; 2Co 5:21; Mt 20:28, Mr 10:45; 1Ti 2:6; 1Pe 1:18; (2) exagorazo, “to buy out of the market.” The redeemed are never again to be exposed to sale; (3) lutroo, “to loose,” “to set free by paying a price” Joh 8:32; Ga 4:4-5; 5:13; Ro 8:21. Redemption is by sacrifice and by power See Scofield “Ex 14:30” Christ paid the price, the Holy Spirit makes deliverance actual in experience Ro 8:2. on Isa 59:20. Cmt. on Ro 1:16. Margin: grace Grace (in salvation), Ro 4:4-16; 3:24. Cmt. on Joh 1:17.)

Reformation: Mt. 12.41-45 & N1 p1013. Lk. 11.24-28.

Regeneration:

  • N1 p88
  • N1 p 111
  • N1 p1117 to John 3.3: “Regeneration: (1) The necessity of the new birth grows out of the incapacity of the natural man to “see” or “enter into” the kingdom of God. However gifted, moral, or refined, the natural man is absolutely blind to spiritual truth, and impotent to enter the kingdom; for he can neither obey, understand, nor please God Joh 3:3,5-6; Ps 51:5; Jer 17:9; Mr 7:21-23; 1Co 2:14; Ro 8:7-8; Eph 2:3 Cmt. on Mt 6:33. (2) The new birth is not a reformation of the old nature Cmt. on Ro 6:6 but a creative act of the holy Spirit Joh 3:5; 1:12-13; 2Co 5:17; Eph 2:10; 4:24. (3) The condition of the new birth is faith in Christ crucified Joh 3:14; 1:12-13; Ga 3:24 (4) Through the new birth the believer becomes a partaker of the divine nature and of the life of Christ Himself Ga 2:20; Eph 2:10; 4:24; Col 1:27; 1Pe 1:23-25; 2Pe 1:4; 1Jo 5:10-12.
  • N3 p1253 (The new man is the regenerate man as distinguished from the old man (Rom. 6.6, note), and is a new man as having become a partaker of the divine nature and life (2 Pet. 1.4; Col. 3.3, 4), and in no sense the old man made over, or improved (2. Cor. 5.17; Gal. 6.15; Eph. 2.10; Col. 3.10). The new man is Christ, “formed” in the believer (Gal. 2.20; 4.19; Col. 1.27; 1 John 4.12).

Religion: N2 p1242 (the word “religion is used 5 times in NT. In a bad sense 4 times (Acts 26.5; Gal. 1.14; Jas. 1.26; Col. 2.18 (“worshipping).  In a sense of a believer’s good works, Jas. 1.27. Never used as synonymous with salvation or spirituality.”)

Remnant:

  • N1 to Is. 11, p723 (“The order of events in Isa. 10., 11., is noteworthy. Isa. 10. gives the distress of the Remnant in Palestine in the great tribulation. Ps 2:5; Re 7:14 and the approach and destruction of the Gentile host under the Beast. Da 7:8; Re 19:20. Is. 11. immediately follows with its glorious picture of the kingdom-age. Precisely the same order is found in Re 19., 20. (See “Kingdom,” O.T., Ge 1:26-28; Zec 12:8 N.T. Lu 1:31-33; 1Co 15:28. Also Cmt. on Mt 3:2 Cmt. on Mt 6:33.
    “That nothing of this occurred at the first coming of Christ is evident from a comparison of the history of the times of Christ with this and all the other parallel prophecies. So far from regathering dispersed Israel and establishing peace in the earth, His crucifixion was soon followed (A.D. 70) by the destruction of Jerusalem, and the utter scattering of the Palestinian Jews amongst the nations.”)
  • 13.12-16; 24.13-15; 65.1-16.
  • 63.7-64.12. Fear and hope of the Remnant (Isa. 1.9; Rom. 11.5) in the day of vengeance..
  • 65.1-16. The answer of Jehovah to the Remnant).
  • N1 to Je. 15.11, p788. (The Remnant, of whom Jeremiah was the representative, are carefully distinguished from the unbelieving mass of the people. The coming captivity, which they must share, for they too have sinned (v.13), though Jehovah’s judgment upon the nation, will be but a purifying chastisement to them and they receive a specila promise (v.11).  Verses 15-18 give the answer of the Remnant to verses 11-14.  Two things characterize t he believing Remnant always—loyalty to the word of God, and separation from those who mock at the word (vs. 16, 17. Cf. Rev. 3.8-10).
  • to Da. 4.34, p905 “And at the end of the days I Nebuchadnezzar lifted up mine eyes unto heaven, and mine understanding returned unto me, and I blessed the most High, and I praised and honoured him that liveth for ever, whose dominion is an everlasting dominion, and his kingdom is from generation to generation:” (A progress may be traced in Nebuchadnezzar’s apprehension of the true God. (1) “God is a God of gods one amongst the national or tribal gods, but greater than they, and a Lord Adonai=Master of kings, and a revealer of secrets” Da 2:47. (2) He is still a Hebrew deity, but Master of angels, and a God who responds to faith Da 3:28. (3) Here Da 4:34-35 the king rises into a true apprehension of God. Cf. Darius, Da 6:25-27.
  • 6.8-10: A remnant to be spared.
  • 11.14-16: The promise to spare the remnant.
  • 13. The message against the lying prophets.
  • 14. The vision of the elders of Israel.
  • 16. The harlotry of Jerusalem.
  • 6.1-3 (5) The voice of the remnant in the last days. (Cf. “Remnant,” Isa. 1.9; Rom. 11.5)
  • 2.12-13. The promise to the remnant.
  • 4:7 “And I will make her that halted a remnant, and her that was cast far off a strong nation: and the LORD shall reign over them in mount Zion from henceforth, even for ever.” See Mcgee, Micah, pp. 125-126. McGee applies this to the remnant sitting in churches (pseudo-saints) who are not genuine. “The day of persecution is coming to church members, and it will reveal quickly who are the true believers and who are not. God has a remnant In the church today.”
  • N2 to Mi. 5.1 p948. (The “word of the Lord that came to Micah” Mic 4:1 having described the future kingdom Mic 4:1-8 and glanced at the Babylonian captivities Mic 4:9-10 goes forward into the last days to refer to the great battle (see “Armageddon,”) “>Re 16:14, on Re 19:17 which immediately precedes the setting up of the Messianic kingdom (see “Kingdom (O.T.),” Ge 1:26 Cmt. on Zec 12:8 also, “Kingdom (N.T.), Lu 1:31-33; 1Co 15:28. Mic 5:1-2 forms a parenthesis in which the “word of the Lord” goes back from the time of the great battle (yet future) to the birth and rejection of the King, Messiah-Christ Mt 27:24-25,37. This is followed by the statement that He will “give them up until the time that she which travaileth hath brought forth” (Mic 5:3). There is a twofold “travail” of Israel: (1) that which brings forth the “man child” (Christ) Re 12:1-2 and (2) that which, in the last days, brings forth a believing “remnant” out of the still dispersed and unbelieving nation Mic 5:3; Jer 30:6-14; Mic 4:10. Both aspects are combined in Isa. 66. In Mic 5:7 we have the “man-child” (Christ) of Re 12:1-2 in Mic 5:8-15 the remnant, established in kingdom blessing. The meaning of Mic 5:3 is that, from the rejection of Christ at His first coming Jehovah will give Israel up till the believing remnant appears; then He stands and feeds in His proper strength as Jehovah (Mic 5:4); He is the defence of His people as in Mic 4:3,11-13 and afterward the remnant go as missionaries to Israel and to all the world. Mic 5:7-8; Zec 8:23.)
  • N2 to Mi. 5.7, p949: “7 And the remnant of Jacob shall be in the midst of many people as a dew from the LORD, as the showers upon the grass, that tarrieth not for man, nor waiteth for the sons of men. 8 And the remnant of Jacob shall be among the Gentiles in the midst of many people as a lion among the beasts of the forest, as a young lion among the flocks of sheep: who, if he go through, both treadeth down, and teareth in pieces, and none can deliver.” (The ministry of the Jewish Remnant (Isa. 1.9; Rom. 11.5, note) has a twofold aspect, “a dew from the LORD”; “a lion among the beasts.” Turning to the Lord in the great tribulation (Psa. 2.5; Rev. 7.14. note), the remnant takes up to the beautiful gospel of the kingdom (Rev. 14.6, note) and proclaims it under awful persecution “unto all nations, for a witness” (Mt. 24.14). The result is seen in Rev. 7.4-14. This is the “dew” aspect, and is followed by the “day of the LORD” (Isa. 2.10-22; Rev. 19.11-21), in the morning of which the kingdom is set up in power. Again there is a world-wide preaching to Jew and Gentile, but now it is the word that the King is on His holy hill of Zion (Psa. 2.), and the unrepentant will be broken with His rod of iron (Psa. 2.6-9. The preaching is given in Psa. 2.10-22. this is the “lion” aspect of the remnant’s testimony (Rev. 2.26-28). The full kingdom-age of blessing follows the “rod of iron” aspect.)
  • 7.7-20. The voice of the remnant in the last days. [Names of certain nations given, e.g., Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, … Ethiopia, Assyria, etc. Zeph. 2:10-11: “This shall they have for their pride, because they have reproached and magnified themselves against the people of the LORD of hosts. The LORD will be terrible unto them: for he will famish all the gods of the earth; and men shall worship him, every one from his place, even all the isles of the heathen.”
  • N1 to Mi. 7.7, p951. (Mic 7:7-20 is, primarily, the confession and intercession of the prophet, who identifies himself with Israel. Cf. Da 9:3-19. Intercession was a test of the prophetic office Jer 27:18; Ge 20:7 But Micah’s prayer voices also the heart exercise of the remnant in the last days. Such is prophecy, an intermingling of the near and the far. (Cf) Ps 22:1; Mt 27:46.)
  • 2.4-15. The call to the remnant in the day of judgment on the nations.
  • 11:11 “And it was broken in that day: and so the poor of the flock that waited upon me knew that it was the word of the LORD.”
  • N3 to Zec. 11.11, p975: “The “poor of the flock”: i.e. the “remnant according to the election of grace” Ro 11:5 those Jews who did not wait for the manifestation of Christ in glory, but believed on Him at His first coming, and since. Of them it is said that they “waited upon Me,” and “knew.” Neither the Gentiles nor the Gentile church, corporately, are in view: only the believers out of Israel during this age. The church, corporately, is not in O.T. prophecy Eph 3:8-10.”
  • 12.10. The Spirit poured out: the pierced One revealed to the delivered remnant. “And I will pour upon the house of David, and upon the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the spirit of grace and of supplications: and they shall look upon me whom they have pierced, and they shall mourn for him, as one mourneth for his only son, and shall be in bitterness for him, as one that is in bitterness for his firstborn.”
  • 12.11-14. The repentance of the remnant.
  • 13.1. The repentant remnant pointed to the cross.
  • 13.1-7. The repentant remnant pointed to the cross.
  • N1 to Zec. 13.8-9, p978. ““8 And it shall come to pass, that in all the land, saith the LORD, two parts therein shall be cut off and die; but the third shall be left therein. 9 And I will bring the third part through the fire, and will refine them as silver is refined, and will try them as gold is tried: they shall call on my name, and I will hear them: I will say, It is my people: and they shall say, The LORD is my God.”” (Zech. 13 now returns to the subject of Zec 12:10. Zec 13:8-9 refer to the sufferings of the remnant Isa 1:9; Ro 11:5 preceding the great battle. Zech. 14. is a recapitulation of the whole matter. The order is: (1) The gathering of the nation, Zec 13:2 (see “Armageddon,” “>Re 16:14 Cmt. on Re 19:11 (2) the deliverance, Zec 13:3; (3) the return of Christ to the Mount of Olives, and the physical change of the scene, Zec 13:4-8; (4) the setting up of the kingdom, and full earthly blessing, Zec 13:9.)
  • HEADNOTE TO HAGGAI, P962. “Haggai was a prophet of the restored remnant after the 70 years’ captivity. The circumstances are detailed in Ezra and Nehemiah. To hearten, rebuke, and instruct that feeble and divided remnant was the task of Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi. The theme of Haggai is the unfinished temple, and his mission to admonish and encourage the builders.
    “The divisions of the book are marked by the formula, “came the word of the Lord by Haggai”: I. The event which drew out the prophecy, 1.1,2. II. The divine displeasure because of the interrupted work, 1.3-15. III. The temples–Solomon’s, the restoration temple, and the kingdom-age temple, 2.1-9. IV. Uncleanness and chastening, 2.10-19. V. The final victory, 2.20-23 (see) Re 19:17-20; 14:19-20; Zec 14:1-3. Margin: sixth month e. September, also Hag 1:15.”
  • HEADNOTE TO ZEC. “Zechariah, like Haggai, was a prophet to the remnant which returned after the 70 years. There is much of symbol in Zechariah, but these difficult passages are readily interpreted in the light of the whole body of related prophecy. The great Messianic passages are, upon comparison with the other prophecies of the kingdom, perfectly clear. Both advents of Christ are in Zechariah’s prophecy Zec 9:9; Mt 21:1-11; Zec 14:3-4. More than Haggai or Malachi, Zechariah gives the mind of God about the Gentile world-powers surrounding the restored remnant. He has given them their authority Da 2:27-40 and will hold them to account; the test, as always, being their treatment of Israel. on Ge 15:18 note 3, clause 6; Zec 2:8.”
    “Zechariah, therefore, falls into three broad divisions: I. Symbolic visions in the light of the Messianic hope, 1.1-6.15. II. The mission from Babylon, 7., 8. III. Messiah in rejection and afterwards in power, 9.-14. Margin: eighth month i.e. November.”
  • 3.16-18.
  • N1 to Mt. 10.16, p1009 “Behold, I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves: be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves.” (The scope of Mt 10:16-23 reaches beyond the personal ministry of the twelve, covering in a general sense the sphere of service during the present age. Mt 10:23 has in view the preaching of the remnant. Isa 1:9. Cmt. on Ro 11:5 in the tribulation Ps 2:5. Cmt. on Re 7:14. and immediately preceding the return of Christ in glory De 30:3; Ac 1:9-11. Cmt. on Ac 1:11. The remnant then will not have gone over the cities of Israel till the Lord comes.)
  • N1 p1036 to Mt. 25.32.
  • N2 p 1204 to Ro. 11.1. “That Israel has not been forever set aside is the theme of this chapter. (1) The salvation of Paul proves that there is still a remnant (v1). (1) The doctrine of the remnant proves it (vs2-6). (3) The present national unbelief was foreseen (vs.7-10). (4) Israel’s unbelief is the Gentile opportunity (vs. 11-25). (5) Israel is judicially broken off from the good olive tree. Christ (vs. 17-22). (6) They are to be grafted in again (vs. 23,24). (7) The promised Deliverer will come out of Zion and the nation will be saved (vs.25-29). That the Christian now inherits the distinctive Jewish promises is not taught in Scripture. The Christian is of the heavenly seed of Abraham (Gen. 15.5, 6; Gal. 3.29), and partakes of the spiritual blessings of the Abrahamic Covenant (Gen. 15.18, note); but Israel as a nation always has its own place, and is yet to have its greatest exaltation as the earthly people of God. See ‘Israel’ (Gen. 12.2; Rom. 11.26); ‘Kingdom’ (Gen. 1.26-28; Zech. 12.8).”
  • N1 p1205 to Ro. 11.5: (Remnant, Summary: In the history of Israel, a “remnant” may be discerned, a spiritual Israel within the national Israel. In Elijah’s time 7,000 had not bowed the knee to Baal 1Ki 19:18. In Isaiah’s time it was the “very small remnant” for whose sake God still forbore to destroy the nation Isa 1:9. During the captivities the remnant appears in Jews like Ezekiel, Daniel, Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, Esther, and Mordecai. At the end of the 70 years of Babylonian captivity it was the remnant which returned under Ezra and Nehemiah. At the advent of our Lord, John the Baptist, Simeon, Anna, and “them that looked for redemption in Jerusalem” Lu 2:38 were the remnant. During the church-age the remnant is composed of believing Jews Ro 11:4-5. But the chief interest in the remnant is prophetic. During the great tribulation a remnant out of all Israel will turn to Jesus as Messiah, and will become His witnesses after the removal of the church Re 7:3-8. Some of these will undergo martyrdom Re 6:9-11 some will be spared to enter the millennial kingdom Zec 12:6-13:9. Many of the Psalms express, prophetically, the joys and sorrows of the tribulation remnant.)

Resurrection:

  • N1 to Is. 26.19, p735 “Thy dead men shall live, together with my dead body shall they arise. Awake and sing, ye that dwell in dust: for thy dew is as the dew of herbs, and the earth shall cast out the dead.” (Eliminate the supplied words, men, and, together with. “Body” is in the plural, “bodies.” Isa 26:19-21 with chapter 27., constitute Jehovah’s answer to the plaint of Israel, Isa 26:11-18. Verse 19 should read: “Thy dead shall live: my dead bodies shall rise” (i.e. the dead bodies of Jehovah’s people). The restoration and re-establishment of Israel as a nation is also spoken of as a resurrection Eze 37:1-11 and many hold that no more than this is meant in Isa 26:19. But since the first resurrection is unto participation in the kingdom Re 20:4-6 it seems the better view that both meanings are here.)
  • N2 p605 to Psm 16 (The 16th Psalm is a prediction of the resurrection of the King. As a prophet David understood that , not at His 1st advent, but at some time subsequent to His death & resurrection Messiah would assume the Davidic throne.  See Acts 2.25-31, with Luke. 1, 32, 33, and Acts 15.13-17.  See “Davidic Covenant,” 2 Sam. 7.14, ; “Kingdom (O.T.),” Zech. 12.8.). Order of events: N1 p1043 to Mt. 28.1 (The order of events in discovering that the Lord had risen). The order of our Lord’s appearances after the resurrection: N2 p1043. Lk. 5.28-32 (the 2 resurrections).
  • N2 p608 to Psm. 22 (At v. 22 the Psalm breaks from crucifixion ot resurrection; fulfilled in the “Go to my brethren,” etc. of John 20.17. the risen Chirst declares to His brethren the name, “Father.”)
  • 24.22-23: The first resurrection: the kingdom-age begun. “And they shall be gathered together, as prisoners are gathered in the pit, and shall be shut up in the prison, and after many days shall they be visited. Then the moon shall be confounded, and the sun ashamed, when the LORD of hosts shall reign in mount Zion, and in Jerusalem, and before his ancients gloriously.”
  • 12.2-3 The Resurrections (Job. 19.25; I Cor. 15.52). (See Dan. 11.2, note.) “Daniel 12:2-3 And many of them that sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, and some to shame and everlasting contempt. And they that be wise shall shine as the brightness of the firmament; and they that turn many to righteousness as the stars for ever and ever.”
    John 5.28-32: The two resurrections. All that are in graves shall be resurrected, some to the resurrection of life, some to the resurrection of damnation.
  • N1 p1043 to Mt. 28.1 “The order of events, combining the four narratives, is as follows: Three women, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of Jesus, and Salome, start for the sepulchre, followed by other women bearing spices. The three find the stone rolled away, and Mary Magdalene goes to tell the disciples. Lu 23:55-24:9; +1″>Joh 20:1-2. Mary, the mother of James and Joses, draws nearer the tomb and sees the angel of the Lord Mt 28:2. She goes back to meet the other women following with the spices. Meanwhile Peter and John, warned by Mary Magdalene, arrive, look in, and go away Joh 20:3-10. Mary Magdalene returns weeping, sees the two angels and then Jesus Joh 20:11-18 and goes as He bade her to tell the disciples. Mary (mother of James and Joses), meanwhile, has met the women with the spices and, returning with them, they see the two angels. Lu 24:4-5; Mr 16:5. They also receive the angelic message, and, going to seek the disciples, are met by Jesus. (Mt 28:8-10).”
  • N2 p1043 to Mt. 28.9: “The order of our Lord’s appearances would seem to be: On the day of his resurrection: (1) To Mary Magdalene Joh 10:14-18. (2) To the women returning from the tomb with angelic message (Mt 28:8-10). (3) To Peter, probably in the afternoon Lu 24:34; 1Co 15:5. (4) To the Emmaus disciples toward evening Lu 24:13-31. (5) To the apostles, except Thomas Lu 24:36-43; Joh 20:19-24. Eight days afterward: (1) to the apostles, Thomas being present Joh 20:24-29. In Galilee: (1a) To the seven by the Lake of Tiberias Joh 21:1-23. (2) On a mountain, to the apostles and five hundred brethren 1Co 15:6. At Jerusalem and Bethany again: (1) To James 1Co 15:7. (2) To the eleven Mt 28:16-20; Mr 16:14-20; Lu 24:33-53; Ac 1:3-12. To Paul: (1) Near Damascus Ac 9:3-6; 1Co 15:8 (2) In the temple Ac 22:17-21; 23:11. To Stephen outside Jerusalem Ac 7:55. To John on Patmos Re 1:10-19.”
  • N1 p1090 to Lk. 11.13 (“* * * Mary alone of the disciples understood Christ’s repeated declaration concerning His death and resurrection (John 12.3-7). Save Mary, not one of the disciples but Peter, and he only in the great confession (Mt. 16.17), manifested a spark of spiritual intelligence till after the resurrection of Christ and the impartation of the Spirit (John 20.22; Acts 2.1-4) * * *”).
  • 5.28-29. The two resurrections. (See v. 29, marg.). “28 Marvel not at this: for the hour is coming, in the which all that are in the graves shall hear his voice, 29 And shall come forth; they that have done good, unto the resurrection of life; and they that have done evil, unto the resurrection of damnation.” Margin: l Resurrection. Vs. 25-29; John 6.39, 40. (Job 19.25; 1 Cor. 15.52.)
  • 1 Co. 15. Part VIII. The coming of the Lord and the first resurrection. (Cf. Rev. 20.5, 11-15.). 1-11. (1) The fact of Christ’s resurrection. vs. 12-19. The importance of Christ’s resurrection. vs 10-34. The order of the resurrections. vs. 35-50. The method of resurrection.
  • I Thessalonians 4.13-18: “13 But I would not have you to be ignorant, brethren, concerning them which are asleep, that ye sorrow not, even as others which have no hope. 14 For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with him. 15 For this we say unto you by the word of the Lord, that we which are alive and remain unto the coming of the Lord shall not prevent them which are asleep. 16 For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first: 17 Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord. Wherefore comfort one another with these words. 18 Wherefore comfort one another with these words.”
  • Resurrection, Summary: N1 to I Cor., 15.52 p1228 “In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed.” (Resurrection, Summary: (1) The resurrection of the dead was believed by the patriarchs Ge 22:5; Heb 11:19; Job 19:25-27 and revealed through the prophets Isa 26:19; Da 12:2,13; Ho 13:14 and miracles of the dead restored to life are recorded in the O.T. 2Ki 4:32-35; 13:21. (2) Jesus Christ restored life to the dead Mt 9:25; Lu 7:12-15; Joh 11:43-44 and predicted His own resurrection Joh 10:18; Lu 24:1-8. (3) A resurrection of bodies followed the resurrection of Christ Mt 27:52-53 and the apostles raised the dead Ac 9:36-41; 20:9-10. (4) Two resurrections are yet future, which are inclusive of “all that are in the graves” Joh 5:28. These are distinguished as “of life” 1Co 15:22-23; 1Th 4:14-17; Re 20:4 and “of judgment” Joh 5:28-29; Re 20:11-13. They are separated by a period of one thousand years Re 20:5. The “first resurrection,” that “unto life,” will occur at the second coming of Christ 1Co 15:23 the saints of the O.T. and church ages meeting Him in the air 1Th 4:16-17 while the martyrs of the tribulation, who also have part in the resurrection Re 20:4 are raised at the end of the great tribulation. (5) The mortal body will be related to the resurrection body as grain sown is related to the harvest 1Co 15:37-38 that body will be incorruptible, glorious, powerful, and spiritual 1Co 15:42-44,49. (6) The bodies of living believers will, at the same time, be instantaneously changed 1Co 15:50-53; Php 3:20-21. This “change” of the living, and resurrection of the dead in Christ, is called the “redemption of the body” Ro 8:23; Eph 1:13-14. (7) After the thousand years the “resurrection unto judgment” Joh 5:29 The resurrection-body of the wicked dead is not described. They are judged according to their works, and cast into the lake of fire. Re 20:7-15.)
  • N1 to 1 Th. 4.17, p1269: “Not church saints only, but all bodies of the saved, of whatever dispensation, are included in the first resurrection. on 1Co 15:52 as here described, but it is peculiarly the “blessed hope” of the Church (cf) Mt 24:42; 25:13; Lu 12:36-48; Ac 1:11; Php 3:20-21; Tit 2:11-13.”
  • N1 p1275 to 1 Timothy 1.20 “Of whom is Hymenaeus and Alexander; whom I have delivered unto Satan, that they may learn not to blaspheme.” (Not church saints only, but all bodies of the saved, of whatever dispensation, are included in the first resurrection. Cmt. on 1Co 15:52 as here described, but it is peculiarly the “blessed hope” of the Church (cf) Mt 24:42; 25:13; Lu 12:36-48; Ac 1:11; Php 3:20-21; Tit 2:11-13.)
  • 1 Th. 5.21-22 “Prove all things; hold fast that which is good. Abstain from all appearance of evil.”
  • 2Ti 2:17-18 It is significant as bearing upon the seriousness of all false teaching, and particularly as related to resurrection, that Paul calls it blasphemy to teach that “the resurrection is past already”.”
  • 2 Timothy 2.17-18: “17 And their word will eat as doth a canker: of whom is Hymenaeus and Philetus; 18 Who concerning the truth have erred, saying that the resurrection is past already; and overthrow the faith of some.”
  • N1 to He. 9.27, p1299 “And as it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment:” “Death, physical, Summary:(1) Physical death is a consequence of sin Ge 3:19 and the universality of death proves the universality of sin (Ro 5:12-14). (2) Physical death affects the body only, and is neither cessation of life nor of consciousness ( on Hab 2:5. Cmt. on Lu 16:23. Re 6:9-10). (3) All physical death ends in the resurrection of the body. See “Resurrection” (Job 19:25. Cmt. on 1Co 15:52.(4) Because physical death is a consequence of sin, it is not inevitable to the redeemed Ge 5:24; 1Co 15:51-52; 1Th 4:15-17). (5) Physical death has for the believer a peculiar qualification. It is called “sleep,” because his body may be “awakened” at any moment (Php 3:20-21; 1Th 4:14-18). (6) The soul and spirit live, independently of the death of the body, which is described as a “tabernacle” (tent), in which the “I” dwells, and which may be put off (2Co 5:1-8; 1Co 15:42-44; 2Pe 1:13-15).(7) At the believer’s death he is “clothed upon” with a “house from heaven” pending the resurrection of the “earthly house,” and is at once “with the Lord.” (2Co 5:1-8; Php 1:23; Lu 23:43.) As to the death of Christ, Cmt. on Mt 27:50.”
  • N1 to Re. 20.5, p1350 “But the rest of the dead lived not again until the thousand years were finished. This is the first resurrection.” (The “resurrection of the just” is mentioned in Lk. 14.13, 14, and the resurrection of “life” distinguished from the “resurrection unto damnation” in John 5.29.  We here learn for the first time what interval of time separates these two resurrections. See 1 Cor. 15.52, note.)

Riches :

  • Psm. 49 (“They that trust in their wealth, and boast themselves in the multitude of their riches; None of them can be any means redeem his brother, not give to God a ransom for him: * * * Be not thou afraid when one is made rich, when  the glory of his house is increased; For when he dieth he shall carry nothing away: his glory shall not descent after him. * * *.”).
  • Psalm 52.7 “Lo, this is the man that made not God his strength; but trusted in the abundance of his riches, and strengthened himself in his wickedness.”
  • Psm. 62.10: “Trust not in oppression, and become not vain in robbery: if riches increase, set not your heart upon them.”
  • Psm. 73. The prosperity of the wicked.
  • Pro. 15.16 (“Better is little with the fear of the LORD than great treasure and trouble therewith.”).
  • Pro. 15.27: “He that is greedy of gain troubleth his own house; but he that hateth gifts shall live.”
  • Pro. 16.16; “How much better is it to get wisdom than gold! And to get understanding rather to be chosen than silver!”
  • Pro. 16.19: “Better it is to be of an humble spirit with the lowly, than to divide the spoil with the proud.”
  • Pro. 23: “4 Labour not to be rich: cease from thine own wisdom. 5 “Wilt thou set thine eyes upon that which is not? For riches certainly make themselves wings; they fly away as an eagle toward heaven.”
  • Mt. 6.19-24; Mt. 8:36-37; Mt. 19.16-26; Mk. 8:34-38; [Mt. 19.13-26, Mk. 10.17-31, and Lk. 10.18-30 (Rich young ruler and the warning against riches]; Lk. 6.25; Lk. 12.13-34 (Man who asks Jesus to “divide tell his brother to divide the inheritance w/him; Parable of the rich fool, etc.); Cor. 8.9; 1 Tim. 6:6-11, 17-19; James 2.5-7, 5.1-6.
  • Mammon: “(riches), Mt. 6.24; Lk. 16.9, a word which often occurs in the Chaldee Targums of Onkelos and later writers, and in the Syriac version, and which signifies “riches.”  It is used in St. Matthew as a personification of riches.”  SMITH’S BIBLE DICTIONARY, Hendrickson Publishers.
  • Mt. 19.16-30; Mk. 10.13-31; Lk. 18.15-17. The rich young ruler.
  • Lk. 12.16-34: “[Begins with a man asking Jesus to speak to his bro. about dividing his inheritance with him, then the parable of the rich fool, then how God cares for the ravens, etc. ]. . . Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat, neither for the body, what ye shall put on. . . . .”
  • Lk. 16.13b: “Ye cannot serve God and mammon.”
  • Lk. 16.19-31: Story of the rich man and Lazarus.
  • Jn. 5.28-31 “28 Marvel not at this: for the hour is coming, in the which all that are in the graves shall hear his voice, 29 And shall come forth; they that have done good, unto the resurrection of life; and they that have done evil, unto the resurrection of damnation. 30 I can of mine own self do nothing: as I hear, I judge: and my judgment is just; because I seek not mine own will, but the will of the Father which hath sent me. 31 If I bear witness of myself, my witness is not true.”
  • Col. 3 “1 If ye then be risen with Christ, seek those things which are above, where Christ sittety on the right hand of God. 2 Set your affection on things above, not on things on the earth. 3 For ye are dead, and your life is hid with Christ in God. 4 When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, then shall ye also appear with him in glory.”
  • I Ti. 6.6-12: “6  But godliness with contentment is great gain. 7 For we brought nothing into this world, and it is certain we can carry nothing out. 8 And having food and raiment let us be therewith content. 9 But they that will be rich fall into temptation and a snare, and into many foolish and hurtful lusts, which drown men in destruction and perdition. 10 For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows. 11 But thou, O man of God, flee these things; and follow after righteousness, godliness, faith, love, patience, meekness. 12 Fight the good fight of faith, lay hold on eternal life, whereunto thou art also called, and hast professed a good profession before many witnesses.”
  • I Timothy 6.17-19: “17 Charge them that are rich in this world, that they be not highminded, nor trust in uncertain riches, but in the living God, who giveth us richly all things to enjoy; 18 That they do good, that they be rich in good works, ready to distribute, willing to communicate; 19 Laying up in store for themselves a good foundation against the time to come, that they may lay hold on eternal life.”
  • 1 Tim. 6.17: “Charge them that are rich in this world, that they be not highminded, nor trust in uncertain riches, but in the living God, who giveth us richly all things to enjoy;”
  • James 1.8-11: “8   A double minded man is unstable in all his ways. 9 Let the brother of low degree rejoice in that he is exalted: 10 But the rich, in that he is made low: because as the flower of the grass he shall pass away. 11 For the sun is no sooner risen with a burning heat, but it withereth the grass, and the flower thereof falleth, and the grace of the fashion of it perisheth: so also shall the rich man fade away in his ways.”
  • James 2.5-7: “Hearken, my beloved brethren, Hath not God chosen the poor of this world rich in faith, and heirs of the kingdom which he hath promised to them that love him?  But ye have despised the poor. Do not rich men oppress you, and draw you before the judgment seats? Do not they blaspheme that worthy name by the which ye are called?”
  • James 5.1-6. The rich warned. “1 Go to now, ye rich men, weep and howl for your miseries that shall come upon you. 2 Your riches are corrupted, and your garments are motheaten. 3 Your gold and silver is cankered; and the rust of them shall be a witness against you, and shall eat your flesh as it were fire. Ye have heaped treasure together for the last days. 4 Behold, the hire of the labourers who have reaped down your fields, which is of you kept back by fraud, crieth: and the cries of them which have reaped are entered into the ears of the Lord of sabaoth. 5 Ye have lived in pleasure on the earth, and been wanton; ye have nourished your hearts, as in a day of slaughter. 6 Ye have condemned and killed the just; and he doth not resist you.”

Righteousness:

  • N1 p967 (Zechariah’s 5th vision discloses: 1 The change from self-righteousness to the righteousness of God (Rom. 3.22, note), of which Paul’s experience, Phil. 3.1-9, is the illustration, as it is also the foreshadowing of the conversion of Israel. 2 In type, the preparation of Israel for receiving Jehovah’s “BRANCH” (Isa. 4.2, note). The refusal of the Jews to abandon self-righteousness for the righteousness of God blinded them to the presence of the BRANCH in their midst at His first advent (Rom. 10.1-4; 11.7, 8). Cf. Zech. 6.12-15, which speaks of he manifestation of the BRANCH in glory (v. 13) as the Priest-King, when Israel will receive Him.  See Heb. 5.6, note.)
  • N2 p1073 (OT righteousness); N1 p1194 to Rom. 3.21; (NT righteousness; the righteousness of God); N3 p1195; N1 p1203 (legal or self-righteousness); N1 p1204 to Rom. 10.10 (believers are the righteous); N1 p1323.
  • N2 p1348 (the garment a symbol of righteousness. In the bad ethical sense it symbolizes self-righteousness (e.g., Isa. 64.6; see Phil. 3.6-8, the best that a moral and religious man under law could do). In the good ethical sense the garment symbolizes “the righteousness of God . . . upon all them that believe.” See Rom. 3.21, note.
  • N1 p1353 (definitions of the different types of righteousness).
  • N1 p1353 (See definitions of OT righteousness (Lk. 2.25); NT righteousness (Rom. 3.22; 10.10); righteous living (1 John 3.7); self righteousness (Rom. 10.3).)
  • Philippians 3.4-9: Warning against trusting in legal righteousness; Christ, object of he believer’s faith for righteousness.

Rod:

  • N1 p74 (The sign of leprosy. The heart (“bosom”) stands for what we are, the hand for what we do. What we are, that ultimately, we do. It is a sign of Lk. 6.43-45.  the two signs, rod and hand, speak of preparation for service: (1) consecration—our capacity taken up for God; (2) the hand that holds the rod of God’s power must be a cleansed hand swayed by a new heart (Isa. 52.11).).
  • N1 to Ex. 7.12, p78 “For they cast down every man his rod, and they became serpents: but Aaron’s rod swallowed up their rods.” ((Cf) Ex 4:2 As Moses’ rod was the rod of power, the rod of the King De 33:4-5 so Aaron’s was the rod of life, the rod of the Priest. As here the serpents, symbols of Satan, who had the power of death Re 12:9; Heb 2:14 are swallowed up, so in resurrection death will be “swallowed up in victory” 1Co 15:54; Nu 17:8.).

Sabbath:

  • 16.23-30 (The Sabbath given to Israel; type of Israel’s kingdom (Heb. 4.8, 9).
  • 31.12-18. The Sabbath a sign between Jehovah and Israel.
  • 35.1-3; Leviticus 23.3.
  • N1 to Ne. 9.14, p550 “And madest known unto them thy holy sabbath, and commandedst them precepts, statutes, and laws, by the hand of Moses thy servant:” (This important passage fixes beyond all cavil the time when the sabbath, God’s rest Ge 2:1-3 was given to man. Cf. Ex 20:9-11. In Ex 31:13-17 the sabbath is invested with the character of a sign between Jehovah and Israel. on Mt 12:1.)
  • N3 p1011 to Mt. 12.1 (good summary of the Sabbath of scripture as well contrasted with the Christian 1st day): “(1) The sabbath (“cessation”) appears in Scripture as the day of God’s rest in the finished work of creation. Ge 2:2-3. For 2500 years of human life absolutely no mention is made of it. Then the sabbath was revealed Ex 16:23; Ne 9:13-14, made a part of the law Ex 20:8-11 and invested with the character of a “sign” between Jehovah and Israel, and a perpetual reminder to Israel of their separation to God Ex 31:13-17. It was observed by complete rest Ex 35:2-3 and by Jehovah’s express order a man was put to death for gathering sticks on the sabbath day. Nu 15:32-36. Apart from maintaining the continued burnt-offering Nu 28:9, and its connection with the annual feasts Ex 12:16; Le 23:3,8; Nu 28:25 the seventh day sabbath was never made a day of sacrifice, worship, or any manner of religious service. It was simply and only a day of complete rest for man and beast, a humane provision for man’s needs. In Christ’s words, “The sabbath was made for man, and not man for the sabbath.” Mr 2:27.(2) Our Lord found the observance of the day encrusted with rabbinical evasions Mt 12:2 and restrictions, wholly unknown to the law, so that He was Himself held to be a sabbath breaker by the religious authorities of the time. The sabbath will be again observed during the kingdom age Isa 66:23. (3) The Christian first day perpetuates in the dispensation of grace the principle that one-seventh of the time is especially sacred, but in all other respects is in contrast with the sabbath. One is the seventh day, the other the first. The sabbath commemorates God’s creation rest, the first day Christ’s resurrection. On the seventh day God rested, on the first day Christ was ceaselessly active. The sabbath commemorates a finished creation, the first day a finished redemption. The sabbath was a day of legal obligation, the first day one of voluntary worship and service. The sabbath is mentioned in the Acts only in connection with the Jews, and in the rest of the N.T. but twice. Col 2:16; Heb 4:4. In these passages the seventh day sabbath is explained to be to the Christian not a day to be observed, but a type of the present rest into which he enters when “he also ceases from his own works” and trusts Christ.”
  • N1 to Mt. 12.8, p1012 “For the Son of man is Lord even of the sabbath day.” (Jesus/ action (Mt. 12.1-7) is highly significant. “What David did” refers to the time of his rejection and persecution by Saul (1 Sam. 21.6). Jesus here is not much the rejected Saviour as the rejected King; hence the reference to David.)

Sacrifice:

  • “To do justice and judgment is more acceptable to the LORD than sacrifice.” Pro. 21.3. “The sacrifice of the wicked is abomination: how much more, when he bringeth it with a wicked mind?” Pro. 22.27. Amos. 4; 5.21-27.
  • N2 p1300 to Heb. 10.18 “Now where remission of these is, there is no more offering for sin.” (Sacrifice, Summary: * * *).

Sacrifice:

  • N2 p150, Lev. 17.11 (the meaning of all sacrifice); the sacrifices must be physically perfect Lev. 22. 17-33
  • N2 p1300 to Hebrews 10.18 “Hebrews 10:18 Now where remission of these is, there is no more offering for sin.” “Sacrifice, Summary: (1) The first intimation of sacrifice is Ge 3:21 the “coats of skins” having obviously come from slain animals. The first clear instance of sacrifice is Ge 4:4 explained in Heb 11:4. Abel’s righteousness was the result of his sacrifice, not of his character. (2) Before the giving of the law the head of the family was the family priest. By the law an order of priests was established who alone could offer sacrifices. Those sacrifices were “shadows,” types, expressing variously the guilt and need of the offerer in reference to God, and all pointing to Christ and fulfilled in Him. (3) As foreshadowed by the types and explained by the N.T., the sacrifice of Christ is penal Ga 3:13; 2Co 5:21; substitutional Le 1:4; Isa 53:5-6; 2Co 5:21; 1Pe 2:24; voluntary Ge 22:9; Joh 10:18; redemptive Ga 3:13; Eph 1:7; 1Co 6:20; propitiatory Ro 3:25; reconciling 2Co 5:18-19; Col 1:21-22; efficacious Joh 12:32-33; Ro 5:9-10; 2Co 5:21; Eph 2:13 Heb 9:11,12,26 10:10-17 1Jo 1:7 Re 1:5; and revelatory Joh 3:16; 1Jo 4:9-10. Margin: sin Cmt. on Ro 3:23.”.

Saducees: N2 p996 (defined)  to Matthew 3.7 “Matthew 3:7  But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees come to his baptism, he said unto them, O generation of vipers, who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come?”[3 Sadducees: Not strictly a sect, but rather those amongst the Jews who denied the existence of angels or other spirits, and all miracles, especially the resurrection. They were the religious rationalists of the time Mr 12:18-23; Ac 5:15-17; 23:8 and strongly entrenched in the Sanhedrin and priesthood Ac 4:1; 5:17. They are identified with no affirmative doctrine, but were mere deniers of the supernatural.].

Saint: See McGee, Ephesians, p19.

Salt: N3 p128 to Leviticus 2.13. “Leviticus 2:13  And every oblation of thy meat offering shalt thou season with salt; neither shalt thou suffer the salt of the covenant of thy God to be lacking from thy meat offering: with all thine offerings thou shalt offer salt.” (Salt. Cf. Nu 18:19; Mr 9:49-50; Col 4:6.)

Salvation:

  • Thou hast given me the shield of thy salvation * * *. The LORD liveth: and blessed be my rock; and let the God of my salvation be exalted.” 18.35, 46. (David understood salvation to be the same as in the NT). “Restore unto me the joy of my salvation * * *.” Psm. 51.12.
  • The Philippian jailor asked “[W]hat must I do to be saved?” And they said, “Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt be saved, and thy house.” Acts 16.30-31.
  • N1 p 1192; N2 p1214 (Salvation v. works. Salvation is a free gift., a present possession. Rewards are earned by works, are a future distinction, to be given at the coming of the Lord.  verses given

Sanctification:

  • See also, holiness; N1 p971.
  • 5.12 – 8.13: Sanctification: indwelling sin, and the Gospel remedy.
  • “Paul * * * Unto the church of God which is at Corinth, to them that are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints, with all that in every place call upon the name of Jesus Christ our Lord, both their’s and our’s.” 1 Cor. 1.1-2.
  • 10 “10 By the which we are sanctified through the offering of the body od Jesus Christ once for all.”
  • N2 p1353 to Rev. 22.11. Sanctification, holiness, Summary: (1) In both Testaments the same Hebrew and Greek words are rendered by the English words ‘sanctify’ and ‘holy,’ in their various grammatical forms. The one uniform meaning is, ‘to set apart for God.’ (2) In both Testaments the words are used of things and of persons. (3) When used of things no moral quality is implied; they are sanctified or made holy because set apart for God.
    (4) Sanctification when used of persons has a threefold meaning. (a) In position, believers are eternally set apart for God by redemption, ‘through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once’ (Heb. 10.9, 10). Positionally, therefore, believers are ‘saints’ and ‘holy’ from the moment of believing (Phil. 1.1; Heb. 3.1). (b) In the Scriptures (Hohn 17.17; 2 Cor. 3.18; Eph. 5.25, 26; 1 Thes. 5.23, 24). In consummation, the believer’s complete sanctification awaits the appearing of the Lord (Ehp. 5.27; 1 John 3.2). See ‘Salvation,’ Rom. 1.16, note.

Sanctuary: N1 p393.

Scorner: Definition: “A derider, a scoffer.  In scripture, one who scoffs at religion, its ordinances and teachers, and who makes a mock of sin and the judgments and threatenings of God against sinners.” See Pro. 14.7-8; 13.1, 15.12; 19.25; 21.11, 24; 22.10; 24.9, 29.8, etc.

Scribes: N2 p 995 (points out that our Lord’s most serious offense was heterodoxy—return to the scriptures themselves instead of to the mass of writings superposed over the Scriptures which was orthodox). “Gr. ‘grammateis,’ = ‘writer.’ Heb. ‘spherim,’ ‘to write,’ ‘set in order,’ ‘count.’ The scribes were so called because it was their office to make copies of the Scriptures; to classify and teach the precepts of oral law Cmt. on Mt 3:7 and to keep careful count of every letter in the O.T. writings. Such an office was necessary in a religion of law and precept, and was an O.T. function 2Sa 8:17; 20:25; 1Ki 4:3; Jer 8:8; 36:10,12,26. To this legitimate work the scribes added a record of rabbinical decisions on questions of ritual (Halachoth); the new code resulting from those decisions (Mishna); the Hebrew sacred legends (Gemara, forming with the Mishna the Talmud); commentaries on the O.T. (Midrashim); reasonings upon these (Hagada); and finally, mystical interpretations which found in Scripture meanings other than the grammatical, lexical, and obvious ones (the Kabbala); not unlike the allegorical method of Origen, or the modern Protestant ‘spiritualizing’ interpretation. In our Lord’s time, to receive this mass of writing superposed upon the Scriptures was to be orthodox; to return to the Scriptures themselves was heterodoxy–our Lord’s most serious offence.”

Sectanianism: Mark 9 “38 And John answered him, saying, Master, we saw one casting out devils in thy name, and he followeth not us: and we forbad him, because he followeth not us. But Jesus said, Forbid him not: for there is no man which shall do a miracle in my name, that can lightly speak evil of me. For he that is not against us is on our part.  For whosoever shall give you a cup of water to drink in my name, because ye belong to Christ, verily I say unto you, he shall not lose his reward.” See also Lk. 9.49-50.

Security of the Believer:

  • 8.35-39 (5) The believer secure. “35 Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? 36 As it is written, For thy sake we are killed all the day long; we are accounted as sheep for the slaughter. 37 Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us. 38 For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, 39 Nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.”
  • One of the chief verses used to attack this principle is 6.4-9: “4 For it is impossible for those who were once enlightened, and have tasted of the heavenly gift, and were made partakers of the Holy ghost, 5 And have tasted the good word of God, and the powers of the world to come, 6 If they shall fall away, to renew them again unto repentance; seeing they crucify to themselves the Son of God afresh, and put him to an open shame.”
  • First, to interpret this verse to mean that one can lose his salvation would mean that the Bible is inconsistent. Everywhere, the Word of God indicates that one can never lose his salvation.
  • Note what the Scofield Bible, p 1289, “THE JEWISH-CHRISTIAN APISTLES,” says regarding this. “* * * It is said of the supposed persons in Heb. 6.4-9 that they had been ‘enlightened,’ and the same word is used in Heb. 10.32, translated ‘illuminated.’  They are said, too, to have ‘tasted’ of the heavenly gift, and again a word importing reality is used, for it occurs in Heb. 2.9 of the death of Christ.  The true point of the divine solicitude is expressed in verses 1 and 2.  It is that they shall go on.  They have made a real beginning, but it is not said of them that they have faith, and it is said (verse 9) that ‘things that accompany salvation’ are ‘better.’  This fear lest beginners will ‘come short’ is the them of Heb. 3.7-4.3.  The men in Mt. 7.21-23 are not conscious hypocrites—they are utterly surprised at their exclusion.  Characteristic contrasts are, Heb. 6.4-6 with Rom. 8.29-39; 2 Pet. 1.10 with Phil. 1.6.  In this respect these Epistles group with Mt. 13-23.; Acts 2-9.”
  • N2 p1295 to Heb. 6.4: “Heb. 6.4-8 present the case of Jewish professed believers who halt short of faith in Christ after advancing ot the very threshold of salvation, even ‘going along with’ the Holy Spirit in His work of enlightenment and conviction (John 16-8-10). It is not said that they had faith. This supposed person is like the spies at Kadesh-barnea (Deut. 1.19-26) who saw the land and had the very fruit of it in their hands, and yet turned back.”
  • 10 “For by one offering he hath perfectred for ever them that are sanctified. 15 Whereof the Holy Ghost also is a witness to us: for after that he had said before, 16 This is the covenant that I will make with them after htose days, saith the Lord, I will put my laws into their hearts, and in their minds will I write them; 17 And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more. 18 Now where remission of these is, there is no more offering for sin. . [Between Heb. 10.25 and 26: Parenthetic: The wavering warned: the Jewish sacrifices had lost their efficacy; it is Christ or judgment.] 38 Now the just shall live by faith: but if any man draw back, my soul shall have no pleasure in him. 39 But we are not of them who draw back unto perdition; but of them that believe to the saving of the soul.””

Seraphim: N1 p840.

Servant (of Jehovah in Scripture):

  • N1 to Is. 41.8, p749: “ 41:8: But thou, Israel, art my servant, Jacob whom I have chosen, the seed of Abraham my friend.” (Three servants of Jehovah are mentioned in Isaiah: (1) David # Isa 37:35; (2) Israel the nation Isa 41:8-16; 43:1-10; 44:1-8; 45:4; 48:20; (3) Messiah Isa 42:1-12, Is 49., entire chapter, but note especially Isa 49:5-7, where the Servant Christ restores the servant nation; Isa 50:4-6; 52:13-15; 53:1-12. Israel the nation was a faithless servant, but restored and converted will yet thresh mountains. Against the Servant Christ no charge of unfaithfulness or failure is brought. Cmt. on Isa 42:1.)
  • N1 to Is. 42.1, p750: “Is. 42:1 Behold my servant, whom I uphold; mine elect, in whom my soul delighteth; I have put my spirit upon him: he shall bring forth judgment to the Gentiles.” (There is a twofold account of the Coming Servant: (1) he is represented as weak, despised, rejected, slain: (2) and also as a mighty conqueror, taking vengeance on the nations and restoring Israel (e.g. Isa 40:10; 63:1-4). The former class of passages relate to the first advent, and are fulfilled; the latter to the second advent, and are unfulfilled.)

Sheol: N3 p956 (sheol & hades)

Shepherd: N1 p1129 to John 10:7 “Then said Jesus unto them again, Verily, verily, I say unto you, I am the door of the sheep.” (The shepherd work of our Lord has three aspects: (1) As the “Good” Shepherd He gives His life for the sheep Joh 10:11 and is, therefore, “the door” by which “if any man enter in he shall be saved.” John 10:9. This answers to Psa. 22. (2) He is the “Great” Shepherd, “brought again from the dead” Heb. 13:20 to care for and make perfect the sheep. This answers to Psa. 23. (3) He is the “Chief” Shepherd, who is coming in glory to give crowns of reward to the faithful shepherds 1Pet. 5:4. This answers to Psa. 24.).

Sin:

  • N2 to Ge. 2.4, p6 “Genesis 2:4 These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the LORD God made the earth and the heavens,” ( … (2) It is significant that the first appearance of the name Jehovah in Scripture follows the creation of man. It was God (Elohim) who said, “Let us make man in our image” (Ge 1:26); but when man, as in the second chapter of Genesis, is to fill the scene and become dominant over creation, it is the Lord God (Jehovah Elohim) who acts. This clearly indicates a special relation of Deity, in His Jehovah character, to man, and all Scripture emphasizes this.
    (3) Jehovah is distinctly the redemption name of Deity. When sin entered and redemption became necessary, it was Jehovah Elohim who sought the sinning ones Ge 3:9-13 and clothed them with “coats of skins” Ge 3:21 a beautiful type of righteousness provided by the Lord God through sacrifice Ro 3:21-22. The first distinct revelation of Himself by His name Jehovah was in connection with the redemption of the covenant people out of Egypt Ex 3:13-17. As Redeemer, emphasis is laid upon those attributes of Jehovah which the sin and salvation of man bring into exercise. These are:
    (a) His holiness Ü”>Le 11:44; 19:1; 20:26; Hab 1:12-13
    (b) His hatred and judgment of sin De 32:35-42; Ge 6:5-7; Ps 11:4-6; 66:18; Ex 34:6-7
    (c) His love for and redemption of sinners, but always righteously Ge 3:21; 8:20-21; Ex 12:12-13; Le 16:2-3; Isa 53:5-6,10 Salvation by Jehovah apart from sacrifice is unknown to Scripture.
    (4) In his redemptive relation to man, Jehovah has seven compound names which reveal Him as meeting every need of man from his lost state to the end. These compound names are:
    (a) Jehovah-jireh, “the Lord will provide” Ge 22:13-14e., will provide a sacrifice;
    (b) Jehovah-rapha, “the Lord that healeth” Ex 15:26. That this refers to physical healing the context shows, but the deeper healing of soul malady is implied.
    (c) Jehovah-nissi, “the Lord our banner” Ex 17:8-15. The name is interpreted by the context. The enemy was Amalek, a type of the flesh, and the conflict that day stands for the conflict of Ga 5:17 the war of the Spirit against the flesh. Victory was wholly due to divine help.
    (d) Jehovah-Shalom, “the Lord our peace,” or “the Lord send peace” Jg 6:24. Almost the whole ministry of Jehovah finds expression and illustration in that chapter. Jehovah hates and judges sin Ge 2:1-5. Jehovah loves and saves sinners Ge 2:7-18 but only through sacrifice Ge 2:19-21 see also Ro 5:1; Eph 2:14; Col 1:20.
    (e) Jehovah-ra-ah, “the Lord my shepherd” (Psa 23.). In Ps. 22 Jehovah makes peace by the blood of the cross; in Ps 23. Jehovah is shepherding His own who are in the world. Cmt. on Joh 10:7
    (f) Jehovah-tsidkenu, “the Lord our righteousness” Jer 23:6. This name of Jehovah occurs in a prophecy concerning the future restoration and conversion of Israel. Then Israel will hail him as Jehovah-tsidkenu–“the Lord our righteousness.”
    (g) Jehovah-shammah, “the Lord is present” Eze 48:35. This name signifies Jehovah’s abiding presence with His people Ex 33:14-15; 1Ch 16:27,33; Ps 16:11; 97:5; Mt 28:20; Heb 13:5
    (5) Lord (Jehovah) is also the distinctive name of Deity as in covenant with Israel Ex 19:3; 20:1-2; Jer 31:31-34.
    (6) Lord God (Heb. Jehovah Elohim) is the first of the compound names of Deity. Lord God is used distinctly:
    (1) of the relation of Deity to man
    (a) as Creator Ge 2:7-15
    (b) as morally in authority over man Ge 2:16-17
    (c) as creating and governing the earthly relationships of man Ge 2:18-24; 3:16-19,22-24 and
    (d) as redeeming man Ge 3:8-15,21; (2) of the relation of Deity to Israel Ge 24:7; 28:13; Ex 3:15; 4:5; 5:1; 7:6; De 1:11; 4:1; 6:3; 12:1; Jos 7:13,19; 10:40,42; Jg 2:12; 1Sa 2:30; 1Ki 1:48; 2Ki 9:6 See other names of Deity, Cmt. on Ge 1:1 Cmt. on Ge 14:18 Cmt. on Ge 15:2 Cmt. on Ge 17:1 Cmt. on Ge 21:33 Cmt. on 1Sa 1:3 Margin: Lord God Deity (names of God) Cmt. on Mal 3:18 )
  • N1 to Ge. 4.7, p11 “If thou doest well, shalt thou not be accepted? and if thou doest not well, sin lieth at the door. And unto thee shall be his desire, and thou shalt rule over him.” (Or, sin-offering. In Hebrew the same word is used for “sin,” and “sin- offering,” thus emphasizing in a remarkable way the complete identification of the believer’s sin with his sin offering (cf) Joh 3:14; 2Co 5:21. Here both meanings are brought together. “Sin lieth at the door,” but so also “a sin-offering croucheth at the tent” It is “where sin abounded” that “grace did much more abound” Ro 5:20. Abel’s offering implies a previous instruction (cf) Ge 3:21 for it was “by faith” Heb 11:4 and faith is taking God at His word; so that Cain’s unbloody offering was a refusal of the divine way. But Jehovah made a last appeal to Cain Ge 4:7 even yet to bring the required offering.)
  • See the sin offering in Leviticus; N1 to Le. 13.2, p141 “When a man shall have in the skin of his flesh a rising, a scab, or bright spot, and it be in the skin of his flesh like the plague of leprosy; then he shall be brought unto Aaron the priest, or unto one of his sons the priests:” (Leprosy speaks of sin as (1) in the blood; (2) becoming overt in loathsome ways; (3) incurable by human means. The anti-type as applied to the people of God is “sin,” demanding self-judgment 1Co 11:31 and “sins,” demanding confession and cleansing. 1Jo 1:9.)
  • 15.24-29 (sins of ignorance): “24 Then it shall be, if ought be committed by ignorance without the knowledge of the congregation, that all the congregation shall offer one young bullock for a burnt offering, for a sweet savour unto the LORD, with his meat offering, and his drink offering, according to the manner, and one kid of the goats for a sin offering. 25 And the priest shall make an atonement for all the congregation of the children of Israel, and it shall be forgiven them; for it is ignorance: and they shall bring their offering, a sacrifice made by fire unto the LORD, and their sin offering before the LORD, for their ignorance: 26 And it shall be forgiven all the congregation of the children of Israel, and the stranger that sojourneth among them; seeing all the people were in ignorance. 27 And if any soul sin through ignorance, then he shall bring a she goat of the first year for a sin offering. 28 And the priest shall make an atonement for the soul that sinneth ignorantly, when he sinneth by ignorance before the LORD, to make an atonement for him; and it shall be forgiven him. 29 Ye shall have one law for him that sinneth through ignorance, both for him that is born among the children of Israel, and for the stranger that sojourneth among them.
  • 15.30 (presumptious sins) “But the soul that doeth ought presumptuously, whether he be born in the land, or a stranger, the same reproacheth the LORD; and that soul shall be cut off from among his people.”
  • N1 to Nu. 21.9, p195 “And Moses made a serpent of brass, and put it upon a pole, and it came to pass, that if a serpent had bitten any man, when he beheld the serpent of brass, he lived.” (Cmt. on Ge 3:14. The serpent is a symbol of sin judged; brass speaks of the divine judgment, as in the brazen altar Cmt. on Ex 27:1, note (2) and self-judgment, as in the laver of brass. The brazen serpent is a type of Christ “made sin for us” Joh 3:14-15; 2Co 5:21 in bearing our judgment. Historically, the moment is indicated in the cry: “My God, My God, why hast Thou forsaken Me?” Mt 27:46.)
  • N2 to Ro. 3.23, p1194: “Sin, Summary: The literal meanings of the Heb. and Gr. words variously rendered “sin,” “sinner,” etc., disclose the true nature of sin in its manifold manifestations. Sin is transgression, an overstepping of the law, the divine boundary between good and evil Ps 51:1; Lu 15:29, iniquity, an act inherently wrong, whether expressly forbidden or not; error, a departure from right Ps 51:9; Ro 3:23, missing the mark, a failure to meet the divine standard; trespass, the intrusion of self-will into the sphere of divine authority Eph 2:1, lawlessness, or spiritual anarchy 1Ti 1:9, unbelief, or an insult to the divine veracity Joh 16:9. Sin originated with Satan Isa 14:12-14, entered the world through Adam Ro 5:12, was, and is, universal, Christ alone excepted Ro 3:23; 1Pe 2:22, incurs the penalties of spiritual and physical death Ge 2:17; 3:19; Eze 18:4,20; Ro 6:23 and has no remedy but in the sacrificial death of Christ Heb 9:26; Ac 4:12 availed of by faith Ac 13:38-39. Sin may be summarized as threefold: An act, the violation of, or want of obedience to the revealed will of God; a state, absence of righteousness; a nature, enmity toward God.”
  • N1 to Ro. 4.25, p1197: “Christ died under our sins 1Pe 2:24; 2Co 5:21 that He was raised and exalted to God’s right hand, “now to appear in the presence of God for us” Heb 9:24 is the token that our sins are gone, that His work for us has the divine approbation and that we, for whom He suffered, are completely justified.”
  • N3 to Ro. 5.12, p1197: “The first sin wrought the moral ruin of the race. The demonstration is simple. (1) Death is universal (Ro 4:12,14), all die: sinless infants, moral people, religious people, equally with the depraved. For a universal effect there must be a universal cause; that cause is a state of universal sin (Ro 5:12). (2) But this universal state must have had a cause. It did. The consequence of Adam’s sin was that “the many were made sinners” (Ro 5:19)–“By the offence of one judgment came upon all men unto condemnation” (Ro 5:18). (3) Personal sins are not meant here. From Adam to Moses death reigned (Ro 5:14), although, there being no law, personal guilt was not imputed (Ro 5:13). Accordingly, from Gen 4.7 to Ex 29.14 the sin-offering is not once mentioned. Then, since physical death from Adam to Moses was not due to the sinful acts of those who die (Ro 5:13), it follows that it was due to a universal sinful state, or nature, and that state is declared to be out inheritance from Adam. (4) the moral state of fallen man is described in Scripture Ge 6:5; 1Ki 8:46; Ps 14:1-3; 39:5; Jer 17:9; Mt 18:11; Mr 7:20,23; Ro 1:21; 2:1-29; 3:9-19; 7:24; 8:7; Joh 3:6; 1Co 2:14; 2Co 3:14; 4:4; Ga 5:19-21; Eph 2:1-3,11; 4:18-22; Col 1:21; Heb 3:13; Jas 4:14; 1Co 15:22.”
  • 5.12-8.13. Part III. Sanctification: indwelling sin, and the Gospel remedy. Ro. 5.12-14. (1) Through Adam, sin and death. Ro. 5.15-21. Through Christ, righteousness and life. Continue to Ro. 8.13 in Scoffield. Ro. 6.1-6 “1 What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound? 2 God forbid. How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein? 3 Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death? 4 Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life. 5 For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection: 6 Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin.”
  • N4 to Ro. 5.14, p1197: “Broadly, the contrast is: Adam: sin, death; Christ: righteousness, life. Adam drew down into his ruin the old creation Ro 8:19-22 of which he was lord and head. Christ brings into moral unity with God, and into eternal life, the new creation of which he is Lord and Head. Eph 1:22-23. Even the animal and material creation, cursed ofr man’s sake. Ge 3:17 will be delivered by Christ. Isa 11:6-9; Ro 8:19-22.”
  • N1 to Ro. 5.21, p1198: “‘Sin’ in Rom 6., 7. is the nature in distinction from ‘sins,’ which are manifestations of that nature. Cf. 1Jo 1:8 where this distinction also appears.”
  • N3 to Ro. 6.15, p1198: “What then? shall we sin, because we are not under the law, but under grace? God forbid.” (The old relation to the law and sin, and the new relation to Christ and life are illustrated by the effect of death upon servitude Ro 6:16-23 and marriage Ro 7:1-6. (1) The old servitude was nominally to the law, but, since the law had no delivering power, the real master continued to be sin in the nature. The end was death. The law could not give life, and “sin” (here personified as the old self) is in itself deathful. But death in another form, ie., crucifixion with Christ, has intervened to free the servant from his double bondage to sin (Ro 6:6-7), and to the law Ro 7:4,6 (2) This effect of death is further illustrated by widowhood. Death dissolves the marriage relation Ro 7:1-3. As natural death frees a wife from the law of her husband, so crucifixion with Christ sets the believer free from the law. on Ga 3:24.)
  • 1 Jn. 3.1-2.

Sinner: N5 P1195 to Rom. 3.31.

Sodomy & sodomites:

  • Leviticus 18.22: “Thou shalt not lie with mankind, as with womankind: it is an abomination.”
  • Leviticus 20.13: “If a man also lie with mankind, as he lieth with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination: they shall surely be put to death; their blood shall be upon them.”
  • Deuteronomy 23:17 “There shall be no whore of the daughters of Israel, nor a sodomite of the sons of Israel.”
  • 1 Ki. 14 (sodomites in the land under Rehoboam). Under Rehoboam, in Judah, Sodomites did according to all the abominations of the nations which the LORD cast out before the children of Israel. 1 Ki. 14.24 (And there were also sodomites in the land: and they did according to all the abominations of the nations which the LORD cast out before the children of Israel.”).  Asa, good king of Judah, did that which was right in the sight of the LORD as did David his father, and took the sodomites out of the land & removed the idols his father had made.  1 Ki. 15.12. Jehoshaphat, good king, removed Sodomites left by Asa, his father. 1 Ki. 22.46.
  • Josiah, good king, brake down the houses of the sodomites. 2 Ki. 23.7.

Sovereignty & Authority of God: Cf Rom. 12; Colossians 1.9-10, 15-19; Heb. 2.7-8, 3.4, 6.

Spiritual: N1 p 1200 to Ro. 7.14 The renewed man who walks in the spirit (1 Cor. 3.1; Gal. 6.1).

Temple:

  • N1, 2 p393. * * * The N.T. invariably expounds the typology of the tabernacle, not of the temple. The symbolism of the latter may be revealed in the kingdom-age. Scriptures given.  In the N.T., the usual Gk. Word for sanctuary (naos) is used (1) of the temple in Jerusalem (Mt. 23.16); (2) of the believer’s body (1 Cor. 3.16, 17; 6.19); (3) of the local church (2 Cor. 6.16); and (4) the true church (Eph. 2.21).  But in all these instances the thought is simply of a habitation of God.  No reference to the structure of the temple, as in the case of the tabernacle (Heb. 9.9-10.) is traceable.
                   2 Chr. 4.20.  In the holy of holies in the tabernacle no light but the shekinah glory was provided.  In many ways Solomon’s temple manifests the spiritual deterioration of the people, and Jehovah’s condescension to it in grace.
  • N1 p396: The consecration of the temple illustrates all consecration. * * *. The temple consecrated, the shekinah-glory fills the house, and Solomon’s sermon, prayer & dedication. 1 Ki. 8.

Temptation: N1 p1307.

Temple, house of God:

  • N1 to Haggai 2.3, p963 “Who is left among you that saw this house in her first glory? and how do ye see it now? is it not in your eyes in comparison of it as nothing?” (The prophet calls upon the old men who remembered Solomon’s temple to witness to the new generation how greatly that structure exceeded the present in magnificence; and then utters a prophecy (Hag 1:7-9) which can only refer to the future kingdom temple described by Ezekiel. It is certain that the restoration temple and all subsequent structures, including Herod’s, were far inferior in costliness and splendour to Solomon’s. The present period is described in Ho 3:4-5. Verse 6 is quoted in Heb 12:26-27. Verse 7: “I will shake all nations,” refers to the great tribulation and is followed by the coming of Christ in glory, as in Mt 24:29-30. “The desire of all nations” is Christ. Cmt. on Mal 3:1.)
  • N1 to Haggai 2.9, p963 “The glory of this latter house shall be greater than of the former, saith the LORD of hosts: and in this place will I give peace, saith the LORD of hosts.” (In a sense all the temples (i.e Solomon’s; Ezra’s; Herod’s; that which will be used by the unbelieving Jews under covenant with the Beast Da 9:27; Mt 24:15; 2Th 2:3-4 and Ezekiel’s future kingdom temple Ez 40.-47.), are treated as one “house”–the “house of the Lord,” since they all profess to be that. For that reason Christ purified the temple of His day, erected though it was by an Idumean usurper to please the Jews. Mt 21:12-13. Margin: glory “Or, the future glory of this house shall be greater than the former.”).

Tithes, offerings. Le. 27:30-34. 1 Corinthians 16:1-2: “Now concerning the collection for the saints, as I have given order to the churches of Galatia, even so do ye. Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him, that there be no gatherings when I come.”

Tongues: 1 Cor. 13.8 (shall cease) ; 1 Cor. 14.

Tribute: Mt. 22.15-22 (Render therefore unto Caesar); Lk. 20.19-26; Mark 12.13-17.

Tribulation, the:

  • Isaiah 24.16-20.
  • N1 p 914 to Daniel 9.24
  • Daniel 12.1. The great tribulation (Psa. 2.5; Rev. 7.14). (See Dan. 11.2, ) “And at that time shall Michael stand up, the great prince which standeth for the children of thy people: and there shall be a time of trouble, such as never was since there was a nation even to that same time: and at that time thy people shall be delivered, every one that shall be found written in the book.”.
  • N1 to Da. 12.4, p919. “But thou, O Daniel, shut up the words, and seal the book, even to the time of the end: many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased.” (The “time of the end” in Daniel. The expression, or its equivalent, “in the end,” occurs, Da 8:17-19; 9:26; 11:35,40; 12:4,6,9. Summary: (1) The time of the end in Daniel begins with the violation by “the prince that shall come” (i.e. “little horn,” “man of sin,” “Beast”) of his covenant with the Jews for the restoration of the temple and sacrifice Da 9:27 and his presentation of himself as God Da 9:27; 11:36-38; Mt 24:15; 2Th 2:4; Re 13:4-6 and ends with his destruction by the appearing of the Lord in glory. 2Th 2:8; Re 19:19-20. (2) The duration of the “time of the end” is three and one half years, coinciding with the last half of the seventieth week of Daniel. Da 7:25; 12:7; Re 13:5. (3) This “time of the end” is the “time of Jacob’s trouble.” Jer 30:7 “a time of trouble such as never was since there was a nation” Da 12:1 “great tribulation such as was not from the beginning of the world. . . nor ever shall be” Mt 24:21. The N.T., especially the Book of the Revelation, adds many details.)
  • to Da. 12.12, p920 “Blessed is he that waiteth, and cometh to the thousand three hundred and five and thirty days.” (Three periods of “days” date from the “abomination” (i.e. the blasphemous assumption of deity by the Beast, Da 12:11; Mt 24:15; 2Th 2:4. (1) Twelve hundred and sixty days to the destruction of the Beast Da 7:25; 12:7; Re 13:5; 19:19-20. This is also the duration of the great tribulation Cmt. on Da 12:4. (2) Dating from the same event is a period of 1290 days, and addition of thirty days Da 12:11. (3) Again forty-five days are added, and with them the promise of Da 12:12. No account is directly given of that which occupies the interval of seventy-five days between the end of the tribulation and the full blessing of verse 12. It is suggested that the explanation may be found in the prophetic descriptions of the events following the battle of Armageddon. Re 16:14; 19:21. The Beast is destroyed, and Gentile world-dominion ended, by the smiting of the “Stone cut out without hands” at the end of the 1260 days, but the scene is, so to speak, filled with the debris of the image which the “wind” must carry away before full blessing comes in Da 2:35.)
  • Micah 4:1 “But in the last days it shall come to pass, that the mountain of the house of the LORD shall be established in the top of the mountains, and it shall be exalted above the hills; and people shall flow unto it.” See Dr. McGee, Micah, pp. 119-121 (The last days refers to the tribulation-that is what the Lord Jesus called it.. Jerusalem will be the center of the millennial kingdom, the capital of the earth.)
  • Micah 4:2 “And many nations shall come, and say, Come, and let us go up to the mountain of the LORD, and to the house of the God of Jacob; and he will teach us of his ways, and we will walk in his paths: for the law shall go forth of Zion, and the word of the LORD from Jerusalem.”
  • N2 to Mt. 24:3, p1032 “And as he sat upon the mount of Olives, the disciples came unto him privately, saying, Tell us, when shall these things be? and what shall be the sign of thy coming, and of the end of the world?” (Mat 24 with Lu 21:20-24 answers the threefold question. The order is as follows: “when shall these things be?”–i.e. destruction of the temple and city. Answer: Lu 21:20-24. Second and third questions: “And what shall be the sign of thy coming, and of the end of the age?” Answer: Mt 24:4-33. Verses 4 to 14 have a double interpretation: They give (1) the character of the age–wars, international conflicts, famines, pestilences, persecutions, and false Christs (cf) Da 9:26. This is not the description of a converted world. (2) But the same answer (Mt 24:4-14) applies in a specific way to the end of the age, viz. Daniel’s seventieth week. Da 9:24-27. Cmt. on Da 9:24. All that has characterized the age gathers into awful intensity at the end. Verse 14 has specific reference to the proclamation of the good news that the kingdom is again “at hand” by the Jewish remnant Isa 1:9; Re 14:6-7. Cmt. on Ro 11:5. Verse 15 gives the sign of the abomination, Cmt. on Da 9:27, the “man of sin,” or “Beast” 2Th 2:3-8; Da 9:27; 12:11; Re 13:4-7.
    This introduces the great tribulation Ps 2:5. Cmt. on Re 7:14, which runs its awful course of three and a half years, culminating in the battle of Cmt. on Re 19:19 at which time Christ becomes the smiting Stone of Da 2:34. The detail of this period (Mt 24:15-28) is: (1) The abomination in the holy place (Mt 24:15); (2) the warning (Mt 24:16-20) to believing Jews who will then be in Jerusalem; (3) the great tribulation, with renewed warning as to false Christs (Mt 24:21-26); (4) the sudden smiting of the Gentile world-power (Mt 24:27-28); (5) the glorious appearing of the Lord, visible to all nations, and the regathering of Israel (Mt 24:29-31); (6) the sign of the fig-tree (Mt 24:32-33); (7) warnings, applicable to this present age over which these events are ever impending (Mt 24:34-51). Phm 1:25. Careful study of Da 2, 7, 9, and Re 13 will make the interpretation clear. See, also, “Remnant” (Isa 1:9; Ro 11:5).)
  • 13.14-23. The great tribulation (Mt. 24.15. See “Tribulation” (Psa. 2.5; Rev. 7.14).
  • 16 “33 These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world.”
  • The great tribulation: Mt. 24.15; Mk. 13.14-23. The Lords return in glory. Mt. 24.27-31; Mk. 13.24-27.
  • N1 p1337 to Revelation 7:14 “And I said unto him, Sir, thou knowest. And he said to me, These are they which came out of great tribulation, and have washed their robes, and made them white in the blood of the Lamb.” (The great tribulation is the period of unexampled trouble predicted in the passages cited under that head from Ps 2:5 to Re 7:14 and described in Re 11.-18. Involving in a measure the whole earth Re 3:10 it is yet distinctly “the time of Jacob’s trouble” Jer 30:7 and its vortex Jerusalem and the Holy Land. It involves the people of God who will have returned to Palestine in unbelief. Its duration is three and a half years, or the last half of the seventieth week of Daniel. on Da 9:24. Re 11:2-3 The elements of the tribulation are: (1) The cruel reign of the “beast out of the sea” Re 13:1 who at the beginning of the three and a half years, will break his covenant with the Jews (by virtue of which they will have re-established the temple worship, Da 9:27 and show himself in the temple, demanding that he be worshipped as God Mt 24:15; 2Th 2:4. (2) The active interposition of Satan “having great wrath” Re 12:12 who gives his power to the Beast Re 13:4-5. (3) The unprecedented activity of demons Re 9:2,11; and (4) the terrible “bowl” judgments of Re 16.
  • The great tribulation will be, however, a period of salvation. An election out of Israel is seen as sealed for God Re 7:4-8 and, with an innumerable multitude of Gentiles Re 7:9 are said to have come “out of the great tribulation” Re 7:14. They are not of the priesthood, the church, to which they seem to stand somewhat in the relation of the Levites to the priests under the Mosaic Covenant. The great tribulation is immediately followed by the return of Christ in glory, and the events associated therewith Mt 24:29-30. See “Remnant” Isa 1:9. Cmt. on Ro 11:5. “Beast” Cmt. on Da 9:24 Cmt. on Re 19:20 “Armageddon” “>Re 16:14. Cmt. on Re 19:17.

Trinity:

  • The trinity is latent in See N1 to Ge. 1.1,p3 “Genesis 1:1 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.”(Elohim (sometimes El or Elah), English form “God,” the first of the three primary names of Deity, is a uni-plural noun formed from El=strength, or the strong one, and Alah, to swear, to bind oneself by an oath, so implying faithfulness. This uni-plurality implied in the name is directly asserted in Ge 1:26 (plurality), Ge 1:27 (unity) see also Ge 3:22. The Trinity is latent in Elohim. As meaning primarily the Strong One it is fitly used in the first chapter of Genesis. Used in the OT about 2500 times. Cmt. on Ge 2:4 Ge 2:7 Cmt. on Ge 14:18 Cmt. on Ge 15:2 Cmt. on Ge 17:1 Cmt. on Ge 21:33 Cmt. on 1Sa 1:3).
  • N2 p997 to Mt. 3.16 “Matthew 3:16 And Jesus, when he was baptized, went up straightway out of the water: and, lo, the heavens were opened unto him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove, and lighting upon him:” (For the first time the Trinity, foreshadowed in many ways in the O.T., is fully manifested. The Spirit descends upon the Son, and at the same moment the Father’s voice is heard from heaven.)
  • N2 to Mt. 28.19, p 1044 “The word is in the singular, the ‘name,’ not names. Father, Son, and Holy Spirit is the final name of the one true God. It affirms: (1) That God is one. (2) That He subsists in a personality which is threefold, indicated by relationship as Father and Son; by a mode of being as Spirit; and by the different parts taken by the Godhead in manifestation and in the work of redemption, e.g. Joh 3:5-6, (Spirit), Joh 3:16-17 (Father and Son). In Mt 3:16-17; Mr 1:10-11; Lu 3:21-22 the three persons are in manifestation together. (3) The conjunction in one name of the Three affirms equality and oneness of substance. See O.T. Names of God: on Ge 1:1 Cmt. on Ge 2:4 Cmt. on Ge 14:18 Cmt. on Ge 15:2 Cmt. on Ge 17:1 Cmt. on Ge 21:33 Cmt. on 1Sa 1:3 The next reference, Mal 3:18, provides a Summary. Cmt. on Mal 3:18. See “Lord” Cmt. on Mt 8:2 “Word” (Logos), Cmt. on Joh 1:1 ‘Holy Spirit,’ Cmt. on Ac 2:4 See ‘Christ, Deity of,’ Cmt. on Joh 20:28.”
  • N1 p1270- to 1 Thes. 5.23. Man a trinity. Body, soul, spirit.
  • 32.
  • It is interesting to consider Rev. 3.21 (Revelation 3:21 “To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne.”) with Re. 4 and Re. 5. The Father is sitting on the throne, but so is Jesus. Re. 5.1 says “him” that sat on the throne. Revelation 5:1 “And I saw in the right hand of him that sat on the throne a book written within and on the backside, sealed with seven seals.” 1 John 5:7 “For there are three that bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one.” John 14:9 “Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known me, Philip? he that hath seen me hath seen the Father; and how sayest thou then, Shew us the Father?” Jesus is in the midst of the throne and came forth and took the book out or the right hand of him that sat on the throne: “Revelation 5:5-7 “And one of the elders saith unto me, Weep not: behold, the Lion of the tribe of Juda, the Root of David, hath prevailed to open the book, and to loose the seven seals thereof. And I beheld, and, lo, in the midst of the throne and of the four beasts, and in the midst of the elders, stood a Lamb as it had been slain, having seven horns and seven eyes, which are the seven Spirits of God sent forth into all the earth. And he came and took the book out of the right hand of him that sat upon the throne.” So there is one on the throne, but there are three on the throne. One on the throne came and took the book out of the right hand of him that sat on the throne.

Trust: N2 p600 (Trust in the OT).

Truth:

  • Psalms 117:1-2: “1 O praise the LORD, all ye nations: praise him, all ye people. 2 For his merciful kindness is great toward us: and the truth of the LORD endureth for ever. Praise ye the LORD.”
  • Psalms 119:89 “For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven.”
  • Psalms 119:142 “Thy righteousness is an everlasting righteousness, and thy law is the truth.”
  • Psalms 119:151 “Thou art near, O LORD; and all thy commandments are truth.”
  • Psalms 119:160 “Thy word is true from the beginning: and every one of thy righteous judgments endureth for ever.”
  • 59.2-19 at v4. “None calleth for justice, nor any pleadeth for truth: they trust in vanity, and speak lies; they conceive mischief, and bring forth iniquity. * * *.”
  • 59.14-15. “And judgment is turned away backward, and justice standeth afar off: for truth is fallen in the street, and equity cannot enter. Yea, truth faileth: and he that departeth fgrom evil maketh himself a prey: and the LORD saw it, and it displeased him that there was no judgment.”
  • Phillipians 3.17-19 (truth not to be compromised for unity); 2 John (Key phrase is “the truth”, by which John means the body of revealed truth, the Scriptures).

Types:

  • N4 p4 to Genesis 1.16 “And God made two great lights; the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rule the night: he made the stars also.” (The “greater light” is a type of Christ, the “Sun of righteousness” Mal 4:2. He will take this character at His second advent. Morally the world is now in the state between Ge 1:3-16; Eph 6:12 Ac 26:18 1Pe 2:9. The sun is not seen, but there is light. Christ is that light +1″>Joh 1:4-5,9 but “shineth in darkness,” comprehended only by faith. As “Son of righteousness” He will dispel all darkness. Dispensationally the Church is in place as the “lesser light,” the moon, reflecting the light of the unseen sun. The stars Ge 1:16 are individual believers who are “lights” Php 2:15-16; Joh 1:5.
    A type is a divinely purposed illustration of some truth. It may be: (1) a person Ro 5:14; (2) an event 1Co 10:11; (3) a thing Heb 10:20; (4) an institution Heb 9:11; 5) a ceremonial 1Co 5:7.Types occur most frequently in the Pentateuch, but are found, more sparingly, elsewhere. The antitype, or fulfilment of the type, is found, usually, in the New Testament. Margin: made The word does not imply a creative act; vs. +4″>Ge 1:14-18 are declarative of function merely.)
  • N1 p100 to Exodus 25.1 “Exodus 25:1 And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying,” “The general authority for the types of Exodus is found: (1) as to the persons and events, in 1Co 10:1-11. (2) as to the tabernacle, in Heb 9:1-24. Having the assurance that in the tabernacle everything is typical, the details must of necessity be received as such. Two warnings are necessary: (1) Nothing may be dogmatically asserted to be a type without explicit New Testament authority; and (2) all types not so authenticated must be recognized as having the authority of analogy, or spiritual congruity, merely. The typical meanings of the materials and colours of the tabernacle are believed to be as follows: Gold, Deity in manifestation–divine glory; silver, redemption Ex 30:12-16. on Ex 38:27, brass, symbol of judgment, as in the brazen altar and in the serpent of brass Nu 21:6-9 blue, heavenly in nature or origin; purple, royalty; scarlet, sacrifice.”
  • N1 to Ex. 25.9, p101 “The enemy said, I will pursue, I will overtake, I will divide the spoil; my lust shall be satisfied upon them; I will draw my sword, my hand shall destroy them.” (The tabernacle, speaking comprehensively, is explained in the N.T. as typical in three ways: (1) of the Church as a habitation of God through the Spirit Ex 25:8; Eph 2:19-22; (2) of the believer 2Co 6:16; (3) as a figure of things in the heavens Heb 9:23-24. In detail, all speaks of Christ: (1) The ark, in its materials, acacia-wood Cmt. on Ex 26:15 and gold, is a type of the humanity and deity of Christ. (2) In its contents, a type of Christ, as: (a) having God’s law in His heart Ex 25:16. (b) the wilderness food (or portion) of His people Ex 16:33 (c) Himself the resurrection, of which Aaron;s rod is the symbol Nu 17:10. (3) In its use the ark, especially the mercy-seat, was a type of God’s throne. That it was, to the sinning Israelite, a throne of grace and not of judgment was due to the mercy-seat formed of gold and sprinkled with the blood of atonement, which vindicated the law, and divine holiness guarded by the cherubim Ge 3:24 Cmt. on Eze 1:5 See PROPITIATION, Cmt. on Ro 3:25)
  • N1 to Le. 11.2 “Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, These are the beasts which ye shall eat among all the beasts that are on the earth.” (The dietary regulations of the covenant people must be regarded primarily as sanitary. Israel, it must be remembered, was a nation living on the earth under a theocratic government. Of necessity the divine legislation concerned itself with the social as well as with the religious life of the people. To force upon every word of that legislation a typical meaning is to strain 1Co 10:1-11; Heb 9:23-24 beyond all reasonable interpretation.)
    “THE FOUR GOSPELS,” p. 989: “I. The Old Testament is a divinely provided Introduction to the New; and whoever comes to the study of the four Gospels with a mind saturated with the Old Testament foreview of the Christ, His person, work, and kingdom, with find them open books.
    “For the Gospels are woven of Old Testament quotation, allusion, and type. The very first verse of the New Testament drives the thoughtful reader back to the Old; and the risen Christ sent His disciples to the ancient oracles for an explanation of His sufferings and glory Lu 24:27,44-45 One of His last ministries was the opening of their understandings to understand the Old Testament.
    “Therefore, in approaching the study of the Gospels the mind should be freed, so far as possible, from mere theological concepts and presuppositions. Especially is it necessary to exclude the notion–a legacy in Protestant thought from post apostolic and Roman Catholic theology–that the church is the true Israel, and that the Old Testament foreview of the kingdom is fulfilled in the Church.
    “Do not, therefore, assume interpretations to be true because familiar. Do not assume that “the throne of David” Lu 1:32 is synonymous with “My Father’s throne” Re 3:21 or that “the house of Jacob” Lu 1:33 is the Church composed both of Jew and Gentile.”

Unbelief:

  • N1 to Nu. 14.23, p186 “Surely they shall not see the land which I sware unto their fathers, neither shall any of them that provoked me see it:” (Kadesh-barnea is, by the unbelief of Israel there, and the divine comment on that unbelief Nu 14:22-38; De 1:19-40; 1Co 10:1-5; Heb 3:12-19 invested with immense spiritual significance. The people had faith to sprinkle the blood of atonement Ex 12:28 and to come out of Egypt (the world), but had not faith to enter their Canaan rest. Therefore, though redeemed, they were a forty years’ grief to Jehovah. The spiritual application is made in Heb. 6.3-11: Cmt. on Heb 6:4.)
  • N1 to Nu. 15, p 186 (The wilderness was part of the necessary discipline of the redeemed people, but not the years of The latter were due wholly to the unbelief of the people at Kadesh-barnea. The Red Sea, Marah, Elim, Sinai, were God’s ways, in development and discipline, and have, of necessity, their counterpart in Christian experience. The Red Sea speaks of the cross as that which–death to Christ but life for us–separates us from Egypt, the world Ga 6:14 Marah of God’s power to turn untoward things into blessings; Elim of God’s power to give rest and refreshment by the way; Sinai of God’s holiness and our deep inherent evil, the experience of +A”>Ro 7:7-24 So far the path was and is of God. But from Kadesh-barnea to Jordan all save the grace of God toward an unbelieving people, is for warning, not imitation 1Co 10:1-11; Heb 3:17-19. There is a present rest of God, of which the Sabbath and Canaan were types, into which believers may, and therefore should, enter by faith Heb 3:1-4:16.)

Vanity: N1 p696 (“Vanity,” in Ecclesiastes, and usually in Scripture, means, not foolish pride, but the emptiness in final result of all life apart from God.  It is to be born, to toil, to suffer, to experience some transitory joy, which is nothing in view of eternity, to leave it all, and to die. See Rom. 8.20-22.).

Vows: See McGee, Judges, pp 175-182; Ecclesiastes 5.2, 4, 5 (Don’t make rash vows, etc.); Jepthah in Jud. 11 made a rash vow & he kept it.

War: Lk. 14.31-33 (Parable of the king going to war).

Wells: N1 to Gen. 26.20, p39 “And the herdmen of Gerar did strive with Isaac’s herdmen, saying, The water is ours: and he called the name of the well Esek; because they strove with him.” (The wells of Genesis have significant names, and are associated with significant events: (1) Beer-lahai-roi, the well of him that liveth and seeth me Ge 16:14; 24:62; 25:11. (2) Beer-sheba, the well of the oath or covenant Ge 21:15-33; 22:19; 26:23-25; 46:1-5. (3) Esek, contention Ge 26:20. (4) Sitnah, hatred Ge 26:21. Esek and Sitnah were Isaac’s own attempts at well-digging. Afterward, he dwelt by the old wells of his father. (5) Rehoboth, enlargement Ge 26:22.).

wilderness: N1 p186 to Numbers 15. (The wilderness was part of the necessary discipline of the redeemed people, but not the years of wandering. The latter were due wholly to the unbelief of the people at Kadesh-barnea. The Red Sea, Marah, Elim, Sinai, were God’s ways, in development and discipline, and have, of necessity, their counterpart in Christian experience. The Red Sea speaks of the cross as that which–death to Christ but life for us–separates us from Egypt, the world Ga 6:14 Marah of God’s power to turn untoward things into blessings; Elim of God’s power to give rest and refreshment by the way; Sinai of God’s holiness and our deep inherent evil, the experience of +A”>Ro 7:7-24 So far the path was and is of God. But from Kadesh-barnea to Jordan all save the grace of God toward an unbelieving people, is for warning, not imitation 1Co 10:1-11; Heb 3:17-19. There is a present rest of God, of which the Sabbath and Canaan were types, into which believers may, and therefore should, enter by faith Heb 3:1-4:16.)

Will of God: N1 p65 to Gen. 46.3: “Genesis 46:3  And he said, I am God, the God of thy father: fear not to go down into Egypt; for I will there make of thee a great nation:” “It is important to distinguish between the directive and the permissive will of God. In the first sense the place for the covenant family was Canaan Ge 26:1-5 is a touching instance of the permissive will of God. Jacob’s family, broken, and in part already in Egypt, the tenderness of Jehovah would not forbid the aged patriarch to follow. God will take up His people and, so far as possible, bless them, even when they are out of His best. In Israel’s choice of a king 1Sa 8:7-9 in the turning back from Kadesh De 1:19-22 in the sending of the spies; in the case of Balaam–illustrations of this principle are seen. It is needless to say that God’s permissive will never extends to things morally wrong. The highest blessing is ever found in obedience to His directive will.”

Without the camp: N1 to Le. 4.12, p130 “Even the whole bullock shall he carry forth without the camp unto a clean place, where the ashes are poured out, and burn him on the wood with fire: where the ashes are poured out shall he be burnt.” (Cf. Ex 29:14; Le 16:27; Nu 19:3; Heb 13:10-13. The last passage is the interpretative one. The “camp” was Judaism– a religion of forms and ceremonies. “Jesus, also, that He might sanctify separate, or set apart for God the people with or ‘through’ His own blood, suffered without the gate” temple gate, city gate, i.e. Judaism civil and religious; Heb 13:12 but how does this sanctify, or set apart, a people? “Let us go forth therefore unto Him without the camp Judaism then, Judaized Christianity now–anything religious which denies Him as our sin-offering bearing His reproach” Heb 13:13. The sin-offering, “burned without the camp,” typifies this aspect of the death of Christ. The cross becomes a new altar, in a new place, where, without the smallest merit in themselves, the redeemed gather to offer, as believer-priests, spiritual sacrifices. Heb 13:15; 1Pe 2:5. The bodies of the sin-offering beasts were not burned without the camp, as some have fancied, because “saturated with sin,” and unfit for a holy camp. Rather, an unholy camp was an unfit place for a holy sin-offering. The dead body of our Lord was not “saturated with sin,” though in it our sins had been borne 1Pe 2:24.)

Witnesses: Deut. 19.15-21: Two witnesses required. False witnesses to stand before the priests and the judges who will diligently inquire to suffer the same penalty as the one falsely testified against.

Woman:

  • As for my people, children are their oppressors, and women rule over them. O my people, they which lead thee cause thee to err, and destroy the way of thy paths.” Isa. 3.12.
    Mcgee, Isaiah, Volume I. “The cause of Israel’s undoing: weak and womanish govt. & loose & low morals” (p39). “The first fifteen verses deal with the subject of weak government and women’s dress. These seem to be totally unrelated subjects, but we shall see that they are not as far removed as they appear to be. Weak govt. is caused by a lack of leadership, as evidenced by women rulers—and we will see what he means by this (40).” See pp. 40-41 for comments upon the lack of great men on the contemporary scene. “It is said that we used to have wooden ships and iron men, but now we have iron ships and wooden men. I would go farther than that and call them paper doll men” (41). Juvenile adults are our rulers, and they are totally incompetent. That is what  brought Israel down to ruin in that day. Their leaders had the mental level of children, and God sent them into captivity. He judged them” (41).
  • 3:12 “As for my people, children are their oppressors, and women rule over them. O my people, they which lead thee cause thee to err, and destroy the way of thy paths.” See McGee’s comments on this on p43 of Isaiah, VI for excellent comments on women, women’s lib., etc.
  • McGee, Isaiah, VI, pp44-45. Is. 3:16 “Moreover the LORD saith, Because the daughters of Zion are haughty, and walk with stretched forth necks and wanton eyes, walking and mincing as they go, and making a tinkling with their feet:” “What a picture of womanhood! The problem, of course, is in the heart. In I Pe. 3.1-4 we read, “”.
  • “Do many of our young girls look appealing, but they are like serpents along the way, as many a man is finding out to his sorrow” Isaiah, VI, p45. “Women’s dress is the barometer of any civilization. When women’s dress is modest it tells something about the nation as a whole. [New paragraph:] In these last few verses twenty articles of women’s wear are mentioned by name. There certainly is nothing wrong with a woman dressing in style—if the style is not immodest. I feel that all of us should look the best we can with what we have, even though some of us don’t have to much to work with. God is not condemning the women of Israel for dressing the style of their day. He is talking about the inner life. They were haughty and brazen. Real adornment is beneath the skin, not from the skin outward. Women’s dress is the key to a nation’s morals…. But, my friend, the bombs are yet to fall on our nation, which I believe will be God’s judgment upon us. (p46)”
  • N1 p969 (* * * A woman, the bad ethical sense, is always a symbol of that which, religiously, is out of its place. The “woman” in Mt. 13.33 is dealing with doctrine, a sphere forbidden to her (1 Tim. 2.12). In Thyatira a woman is suffered to teach (Rev. 2.20).  The Babylon phase of the apostate church is symbolized by an unchaste woman, sodden with greed and luxury of commercialism (Rev. 17.1-6; 18.3, 11-20).  See also N3 p1016.
  • “When women come into the position of authority it is a sign of weakness and of a flabby age. Barak was a sissy.  America is paying an awful price for taking women into its defense system and into industry.  I made this statement as far back as 1948, and I am no prophet, but I predicted a backwash of immorality if women left the home.  It came to pass.  First, there was an epidemic of women shooting their husbands, deserting their children, becoming dope peddlers and committing suicide—inflation, crime, foreign aggression—but I feel the greatest danger is that women are leaving their place in the home.” McGee, Judges,
  • See also, N2 p1016 to Mt. 31.
  • N1 p1090 to Lk. 11.13 (“* * * Mary alone of the disciples understood Christ’s repeated declaration concerning His death and resurrection (John 12.3-7). Save Mary, not one of the disciples but Peter, and he only in the great confession (Mt. 16.17), manifested a spark of spiritual intelligence till after the resurrection of Christ and the impartation of the Spirit (John 20.22; Acts 2.1-4) * * *”).
  • I Corinthians 14.34-35: “Let your women keep silence in the churches: for it is not permitted unto them to speak; but they are commanded to be under obedience, as also saith the law. And if they will learn any thing, let them ask their husbands at home: for it is a shame for women to speak in the church.”
  • I Timothy 2.9-15. “In like manner also, that women adorn themselves in modest apparel, with shamefacedness and sobriety; not with broided hair, or gold, or pearls, or costly array; But (which becometh women professing godliness) with good works. Let the woman learn in silence with all subjection. But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence. For Adam was first formed, then Eve. And Adam was not deceived, but the woman being deceived was in the transgression. Notwithstanding she shall be saved in childbearing, if they continue in faith and charity and holiness with sobriety.”

Word of God: Pro. 30: “5 Every word of God is pure: he is a shield unto them that put their trust in him. 6 Add thou not unto his words, lest he reprove thee, and thou be found a liar.”

Works vs. faith:  N1, p1083 (excellent note on this subject).

Worship:

  • N1 p111 to Exodus 30.9 “Ye shall offer no strange incense thereon, nor burnt sacrifice, nor meat offering; neither shall ye pour drink offering thereon.” “(Cf.) Le 10:1-3, two prohibitions are given concerning worship: (1) No “strange” incense is to be offered. This speaks of simulated or purely formal worship. (2) No “strange” fire was permitted. This refers to the excitation of “religious” feelings by merely sensuous means, and to the substitution for devotion to Christ of any other devotion, as to religious causes, or sects. (Cf) 1Co 1:11-13; Col 2:8,16-19. on Ex 30:38.”
  • N2 to Ex. 30.18, p111 “Exodus 30:18 Thou shalt also make a laver of brass, and his foot also of brass, to wash withal: and thou shalt put it between the tabernacle of the congregation and the altar, and thou shalt put water therein.” (Laver, type of Christ cleansing us from defilement, and from “every spot or wrinkle or any such thing” Joh 13:2-10; Eph 5:25-27. It is significant that the priests could not enter the holy place after serving at the brazen altar till hands and feet were cleansed.55)
  • N3 to Ex. 30.38, p112 “Whosoever shall make like unto that, to smell thereto, shall even be cut off from his people.” “What is condemned here is making worship a mere pleasure to the natural man, whether sensuous, as in beautiful music to please the ear, or eloquence, merely to give delight to the natural mind. (Cf) Joh 4:23-24.”
  • Exodus 30. the great worship chapter.
  • N1 to Le. 10.1, p`38 “Leviticus 10:1 And Nadab and Abihu, the sons of Aaron, took either of them his censer, and put fire therein, and put incense thereon, and offered strange fire before the LORD, which he commanded them not.” (Strange fire. Fire “from before the Lord” had kindled upon the altar of burnt-offering the fire which the care of the priests was to keep burning Le 6:12. No commandment had yet been given Le 16:12 how the incense should be kindled. The sin of Nadab and Abihu was in acting in the things of God without seeking the mind of God. It was “will worship” Col 2:23 which often has a “show of wisdom and humility.” It typifies any use of carnal means to kindle the fire of devotion and praise.Margin: Nadab Na-dab, ‘liberal.’ Abihu A-bi-hu, ‘God is father.’)

Zion: N1 to I Chr.11.5 p469 “And the inhabitants of Jebus said to David, Thou shalt not come hither. Nevertheless David took the castle of Zion, which is the city of David.” (Heb. castle. (1) Zion, the ancient Jebusite stronghold, is the southwest eminence in Jerusalem, called in Scripture the city of David, and associated with the Davidic royalty both historically and prophetically 1Ch 11:7; Ps 2:6; Isa 2:3. The word is often used of the whole city of Jerusalem considered as the city of God Ps 48:2-3 especially in passages referring to the future kingdom-age Isa 1:27; 2:3; 4:1-6; Joe 3:16; Zec 1:16; 8:3-8; Ro 11:26. In Heb 12:22 the word is used symbolically of heaven. (2) In De 4:48 the name is given to a projection or peak of Mount Hermon.).

 


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